Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Copshock, Surviving Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Surviving Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Ptsd) Paperback – May 1, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0966850109 ISBN-10: 0966850106 Edition: a

8 New from $18.93 29 Used from $2.57 1 Collectible from $42.76
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.93 $2.57
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 472 pages
  • Publisher: Holbrook Street Pr; a edition (May 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0966850106
  • ISBN-13: 978-0966850109
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #264,620 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A powerful book! It's well written, fast paced.... I was glued to each story." Peter Schweitzer, Law Enforcement Coordinator, Seafield Center.

"One of the first to dramatically expose the stresses on some of the most important people in our society: police officers." Aphrodite Matsakis, Ph.D., author of I Can't Get Over It.

"Allen Kates has done a real service for cops. His stories are compelling and you won't find a better, more complete listing of support sources anywhere!" Ellen Kirschman, Ph.D., author of I Love A Cop.

"We didn't ask for PTSD, as veterans, police, or victims of any traumatic experience, but we can ask for a copy of this book for better understanding." Rod 'Doc' Kane, combat veteran, author of Veteran's Day.

"I would recommend this book not only to police officers, but to anyone with PTSD, or anyone at high risk of developing symptoms of PTSD." Bennett A. Jennings, Ph.D., clinical psychologist, PTSD Clinical Team, Department of Veterans Affairs. -- Publisher Comments

From the Back Cover

CopShock Surviving Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) This book is for active and retired police officers, police recruits, war veterans, corrections officers, paramedics, firefighters, nurses, doctors, security guards, crime victims-anyone suffering from trauma. Nightmares, flashbacks, anger, concentration problems, emotional detachment, avoidance of people and places... These are some of the signs of PTSD. As many as one in three cops may suffer from PTSD, a condition that could lead to depression, suicidal thoughts, addictions, eating disorders as well as job and family conflict. CopShock reveals how to prevent or manage dangerous PTSD symptoms that can destroy a police officer's career and family life. Recommended by trauma experts, this easy-to-read book -Prepares police officers for the aftermath of horrific trauma -Helps families understand PTSD's effect on their loved ones -Tells true stories of officers-men and women-with PTSD -Offers over 200 international support sources "...a powerful book! It's well written, fast paced... I was glued to each story."

-Peter Schweitzer, Law Enforcement Coordinator, Seafield Center "...one of the first to dramatically expose the stresses on some of the most important people in our society: police officers."

-Aphrodite Matsakis, Ph.D., author of I Can't Get Over It "Allen Kates has done a real service for cops. His stories are compelling and you won't find a better, more complete listing of...support sources anywhere!"

-Ellen Kirschman, Ph.D., author of I Love A Cop "We didn't ask for PTSD, as veterans, police, or victims of any traumatic experience, but we can ask for a copy of this book for better understanding..."

-Rod "Doc" Kane, combat veteran, author of Veteran's Day This book is a reference for a healthier, happier quality of life. You will refer to it often.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
16
4 star
1
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 18 customer reviews
Book was recommended by therapist.
Patrick Bunch
I got the book and read it, cover-to-cover.
Occupy Bawl Street com
It is must reading for all police officers.
Carlos W. Propst

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Seppo Vesala on August 23, 2003
Format: Paperback
When I read other customer's reviews on CopShock, I got the impression that the book is the ultimate in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and it holds all the answers. I was disappointed, however, because although there is some good basic info, the book serves better as an introduction to PTSD.
The author uses a lot of real-life stories to illustrate different aspects of PTSD and related syndromes. Almost the whole book is written this way, and this structure makes the book easy to read and not too scientific. On the other hand, is makes it difficult to use the book as an reference book. If you want to search for a list of symptoms of a given syndrome, for example, the information can be scattered along the pages of the whole book.
The book has about 450 pages, but the text really ends at about page 240. The remaining almost 200 pages is filled with listings of various support sources and so on. There is also extensive reference section, and bibliography of well over 200 publications related to the subject.
I rated the book as a whole, but the book's usefulness is directly dependent to whether you need the latter half of the book, of if you are just studying the subject. To someone who is suffering from PTSD (or whose member of family is), the book could be worth it's weight in gold.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Hale on April 22, 2000
Format: Paperback
Copshock is the real deal. I am a disabled police officer with post traumatic stress disorder and I easily identified with the information in Allen's book. I found myself sitting in the living room floor with a highlighter making notes as I read. It was like looking in a mirror. Excellent source listing for police and emergency service workers in need of help for everything from PTSD to alcohol dependency and drug addiction. A super job.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Carlos W. Propst on June 20, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am a retired police officer. I can relate to many of the stories and incidents in this book. I have PTSD. I didn't know what it was called until just before I bought the book "CopShock". It is must reading for all police officers. I only wish I would have had this book years ago. It is hard to put down once you start reading it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 15, 2005
Format: Paperback
For a time, Post-traumatic stress disorder was big news in the recovery of Vietnam veterans; it is becoming news again in the situations involving Iraq and Afghanistan conflict veterans. What has never been common in the news, but has been an ongoing situation, is the kind of post-traumatic stress that lingers with people who are in a sense on the front lines every day - policemen, firefighters, emergency responders, medical workers and others in helping professions. This kind of stress can even be present for victims of crime.

This book is a great resource for these people. It involves personal stories, recounted sometimes by those suffering from PTSD, and sometimes by those around the suffering people in relationships of family or profession. Different elements of the syndrome are presented here - flashbacks and nightmares (both of real and anticipated events), drug-taking (everything from steroids to gain strength, ostensibly to fight better and be more secure, to opiate/narcotic and other types of drugs to mask the pain and insecurity), broken relationships and more.

One aspect of the job of many civilian (i.e., non-military) workers is that they have had military training, and may be carrying PTSD baggage with them that somehow becomes reactivated. In a very moving story, the account of one Vietnam-veteran-turned-policeman is recounted with the difficulties that resurfaced over a victim similar to one of his own victims in Vietnam. While military veterans often make good police officers, they can also be walking powder-kegs of a sort.

About half this book recounts stories and tales from different angles of PTSD.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Andy O'Hara on February 18, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
CopShock hits the nail on the head, going beyond the trauma associated with "a single event," the battle cry of militant mental health professionals who refuse to recognize the long-term soul battering to which so many police officers are subjected. Instead, Kates dares to suggest that, while one traumatic incident is sufficient to set PTSD in motion, "sometimes a history of unresolved trauma will affect" the final diagnosis ('cumulative PTSD,' though he avoids the term). Officers are trained to repress their trauma and shove it away, drink it away, abuse it away for years, incident after incident. They can only do this so long before the scaffolding collapses. The lack of effective prevention programs only makes this worse.

I applaud Kates for coming right out and saying that "police officers cannot manage PTSD on there own," that they should consult a mental health professional for a diagnosis, and that "therapy is essential and medication, at least for a while, may be necessary." This is the direct kind of talk that agencies need to pay attention to as they enhance their programs.

CopShock reveals, however, that there is still dispute among the medical community on how to read the Diagnostic Manual's "official" definition of PTSD. Some take a restrictive, "sentence diagramming" approach, while others read it in light of modern learning, observation and realistic case observation. Personally, one might consider this when selecting between a departmental therapist and a personal one.

Bottom line--some gripping case studies that make clear the potent, life-threatening dangers of posttraumatic stress in law enforcement.

Andy O'Hara, Badge of Life program
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews