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Core Java 1.2 : Volume 1 Fundamentals Paperback – January 15, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0130819338 ISBN-10: 0130819336 Edition: Bk&CD-Rom

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Product Details

  • Series: Java Series (Sun Microsystems Pr)
  • Paperback: 737 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall Ptr; Bk&CD-Rom edition (January 15, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0130819336
  • ISBN-13: 978-0130819338
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.9 x 2.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (122 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,524,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

If you need to get something done in Java, Core Java 1.2, Volume 1--Fundamentals is one of the best books you can turn to for assistance. It's devoid of shaky, academic examples and packed with robust demonstrations that illustrate hundreds of powerful concepts.

This book begins with an explanation of the Java programming and execution environments in general terms and then provides specific examples of how to put key parts of the core packages to work. The authors back up the many examples with sharp, fact-rich commentary on how to get things done with Java. This volume covers data structures, object orientation, events, applets, input/output, and Swing.

A quick note: though the title of this book includes the words Java 1.2, the Java examples appear to be based on a very late beta and effectively cover what's now called Java 2. JavaSoft changed the name of the software during the final stages of testing--after the authors had finished this book. --David Wall

From the Publisher

Java 2 platform was formerly code-named JDK 1.2

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Customer Reviews

I cringed everytime I found something like this in the book.
C RODRIGUES MACIAS
It is an excellent java book for anyone with any programming experience who is willing to do a patient, sincere java learning.
Jayashree Ravi
It is also great for a reference book since it is chuck full of facts and examples.
"dustin_marceau"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

61 of 64 people found the following review helpful By C RODRIGUES MACIAS on October 27, 1999
Format: Paperback
Overall, this book is easy to read, has good to-the-point examples, and covers the material in the right depth for someone with some programming experience who wants to start learning Java. It has such a nice presentation of the material that I wanted to rate it five starts.
The sad part is that this book has a near-fatal flaw: it teaches novice Java programmers some really awful programming habits.
For example, here we have a supposedly up-to-date cutting-edge intro to Java 2 that is teaching newbies that the Vector(!) class is the latest and greatest way to hold groups of objects. Vector and its cousin the Hashtable were retained in Java 2 only for 'backward compatibility', and Java 2 programmers should be using one of the (much better designed) new collection classes. This book never mentions them, instead presenting Vector as 'the way to go'.
Another set of 'bad habits' the authors are pushing is their approach to AWT event handling. Creating inner classes as event listeners (the OO way to do this) is touched on briefly, but almost every example shows a primary class implementing the ActionListener interface and 'if' statements being used to determine the source of the event. (!?!) Here, Horstman and Cornell have pulled out the 'workarounds' required by the old Java 1.0 event model and presented them as 'the way to do this' to legions of unsuspecting Java students.
I cringed everytime I found something like this in the book. The fact that this book is so well written and designed (not to mention that it comes from Sun and is quite likely outselling all other Java tutorials combined) just makes it worse. IMHO, giving a student bad information, and training him or her in bad habits that will be hard to unlearn, is about the worst sin a teacher can commit.
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52 of 55 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
I have noticed that some readers give the rating very low, while others give very high. I read the Core Java 1.1 (vol 1 and vol 2)from ends to ends. Here are my remarks: 1) If you do not already know some object-oriented programming (such as C++), you may find the books a little tough to comprehend. But if you persist, I think you will do fine. 2) The books contain some remarks here and there, comparing java with Visual Basics and C++. Some of these remarks are helpful and others are annoying. On the whole, it does not help or hurt much. 3) The book teach java, irrespect of the computer platform. Because most people use PC platforms, the authors pay more attention to PC users. However, this preferential attention is so minor in comparing to the books overall contents. 4)Personally, I like the books. I bought the second volume because I like the first volume. I like the second volume too. I truely believe that my remark is a fair, objective one. I Hope you'll find this comment to be useful.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Benson on March 6, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm an experienced VB programmer who understands advanced object-oriented concepts and has been itching to learn a language that can implement them. Coming from a strong VB background, this book was IDEAL for me. I don't think I would recommend it to someone who was new to programming, but this book has really gotten me up to speed quickly. I honestly can't imagine a better way they could have laid it out or presented the information.
The tone was conversational, and there were lots of high-level discussion paragraphs (for me, this is good, because I hate thinly disguised reference material). The whys are covered, as well as the whats and hows. Maybe this book isn't appropriate for people coming from other backgrounds, but I think it's ideal for VB developers who want to learn about Java - not just semantic differences, but the core philosophical undercurrents of both language. (Note - the book is peppered with mini-sidebars for VB programmers and C++ programmers.)
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Pete Boton, CCP (PeteBoton@compuserve.com) on March 20, 1999
Format: Paperback
This is a revised and updated edition of the authors' excellent Java 1.1 book. In a sea of horrible Java books (including garbage by Grand, Walsh, and Deitel), this volume provides welcome relief.
The explanations are clearly written and backed up by good examples. The material is accurate and up to date.
This book is the best Java tutorial for people who already know how to program. Readers who know C++ or Visual Basic will appreciate the scattered notes that compare Java to those languages. The only possible drawback is that non-programmers may have trouble understanding some of the concepts.
This is a large volume that provides good coverage of most major topics, including more than a hundred pages about Swing. However, some important topics (e.g., threads) have been moved back to Volume 2. I can hardly wait.
BTW, Sun renamed Java 1.2 last December. It is now called Java 2. This book has just appeared with a new cover that reflects the name change. Buy either one -- they're really the same book.
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35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
Core Java 1.2 was disappointing on several levels. Despite the cover claim "hard core java for serious programmers," the book is most appropriate for beginning programmers. It takes over 100 pages to explain basic datatypes and program statements -- including flowcharts for if-, while- and do- statements! Pretty handy for a "serious" programmer. Two chapters and another hundred pages are devoted explaining objects and inheritance. With big type, large chapter headings, and figures of questionable utility, the book has pretty low information density, making easy to read. Unfortunately the index is not very good so you have to flip through many pages to find that pearl of information.
Most disturbing is the authors' lack of understanding. The book is filled with jibes like "The interal architecture fo the list component that makes this generality possible is rather elegant. Unfortunately, the designers at Sun felt that they needed to show off that elegance, rather than hiding it from the programmer who just wants to use the component" p420. They are discussing the JList UI component and apparently fail to recognize the benefits of the model-view-controller architecture and the advantages of orthogonal design. The nadir occurs while they are demonstrating how to create an custom event. They derive their TimerEvent class from AWTEvent which requires mucking around with the system event queue which they could have avoided had they derived from EventOjbect, like all the other data model event sources.
I bought the book because it was published by Sun Microsystems Press and I expected them to have particular insight into Java and how it should be used. Alas. At least Sun could have gotten authors who understood what the Java architects are trying to accomplish. Maybe next time.
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