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4.4 out of 5 stars
Coreyography: A Memoir
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95 of 103 people found the following review helpful
on October 29, 2013
I have no real idea why I chose to read this book, except that I kind of always had a mild, very mild fascination with "The Two Coreys". I actually enjoyed their short lived tv show on A&E a few years ago.

I picked this one up not expecting much - especially since I seem to be in a reading slump these days (can't find anything great).

Imagine my surprise when I found myself enjoying this memoir. Unlike many memoirs, Corey was a child star so his younger days are actually pertinent to the story - and Feldman mercifully kept the child years short and to the point. In fact, this book is written throughout in this fashion - while he covers every aspect of his life, he doesn't go on and on about the minute details and manages to focus longer on the subjects or things that actually make this memoir interesting.

Yes, he covers Michael Jackson and he also covers the rotten childhood he has had. He also talks about other things which came as a bit of a surprise to me (no spoilers sorry!).

Throughout though, there is a surprising tone of sadness and it is apparent that Feldman was (is?) not a happy, happy guy. He details the gory details about Hollywood and made me want to stay as far away from there as possible.

Now, I am not sure if this book is pure fiction or if this truly is how he feels about his life - because I have heard him in interviews and he can come off as flaky and self-serving at times, but I do believe that his thoughts and feelings as described here are sincere...
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58 of 65 people found the following review helpful
on October 29, 2013
Corey Feldman is very brave and has matured into a good writer. He writes in order to enlighten and bring to light something that is obviously a sickness in Hollywood. Many many many men, women and children have been destroyed or disintegrated by the Hollywood industry. For every great artist, film, star, there must be many dark stories, secrets and abuse that we simply do not know about. This is Corey's own story. Different stories do exist. Even if we don't want to believe them. No one wants to write about pain and suffering but those who triumph over it bring back lessons, warnings and understanding so that others may learn and hopefully learn from and avoid their pain.

There is no question that pedophiles seek out children. And that parents in the industry have exploited their child stars.Does anyone remember any stars from the 1970s or 1980's that did not get ruined or hit a wall of drugs by the time them were a young adult? What child can understand and comprehend power, sexual advances, drugs, manipulation, contracts? Who can survive that without protection and guidance.

Its only when people speak up that we can learn of the dangers that prevail. No one would want to have to tell this story. It takes a strong person who's done a lot of work to get their story out.

Hollywood had a very very very dark side. Corey Feldman is shinning some light and we should applaud the effort. Thank you Corey Feldman for being strong and honest. Parents, take a very close second and third and even fourth look at those weird overly nice adults just so eager to take care of your kids. And watch their girlfriends and boyfriends too. The way the world is, your instincts should be powerful to protect and watch over your children.

Shame on the predators who hide and live off off the innocent to feed their disgusting appetites. Those people (like all criminals and violators) know who they are. Rest assured they face a long excruciating punishment especially if they chose to continue to attack and assault fellow human beings. This is my observation in life. It always comes back in one form or another and it just doesn't let you go. No matter how depraved someone is, their karma is waiting for them. And it will last a very long time. In the meantime, they should be held accountable for what they do and be removed from the general public. And why not?
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on October 31, 2013
Although Corey Feldman's movies formed the backdrop for my early years, I never considered myself a "fan". I was not one to read teen magazines or watch the entertainment shows on TV. I was a kid, three years younger than Corey himself, and I think my bedtime for much of his career was between 7 and 8. He was quite simply, always there, in a great many important movies over the course of my Elementary, Middle and High School years. That isn't to say that I didn't like him in all of these films, he was wonderful! That being said, I ordered Coreyography: A Memoir for my Kindle as soon as I heard that Corey Feldman had written his story.

When I saw in the paper that he was coming out with this book I did some searches online. I was and still am appalled at some of the negativity that surrounds Corey Feldman's career. People say things online, behind the luminous veil of the computer screen, that they would never say to someone's face, and that is much more true for celebrities than for the rest of us. Their lives are an open book, even though that "book" tends to be full of lies put out there by magazines and people with their own agendas. (I was happy to see an interview Corey did with Brandon Kaplan at the end of the summer. Of all that I have seen online, this interview seemed positive, honest, fair and real.)

The book was auto-delivered to my Kindle on Sunday and I just finished it this morning. It is full of stories from his beginnings in the industry straight through to today and he is brutally honest about some very difficult times in his life and the lives of his close friends. He paints a very real picture of the movie business from the perspective of a young actor, who more often than not, is not calling the shots. This is the story of his life, but it is more than that, it is the story of a Hollywood rarely seen. It is a look at a very unfriendly world where great things are often just outside of reach. Where stardom and wealth, glitz and shine, is found on set and at red carpet events, but real life takes place between jobs at a scattering of apartments and temporary housing.

I got lost in the memoir. The personal stories behind the making of his movies, trying out for parts, interacting with his peers (both actors and classmates), are engaging and well proportioned. It is very much written in his voice, you can easily imagine that he's sitting across the room relating his experiences in person. And it isn't hard to understand why he waited until now to publish this work. With the passing of a number of close friends he is more free to tell the whole truth, or as close to it as he is comfortable. There are a few things that even now he is unwilling to disclose and he explains why honestly and understandably.

For what it's worth, as I'm not a writer/reviewer, I would highly recommend this book to anyone who, like me, grew up on this side of the screen from Corey Feldman.

(As a side note: If Amazon has any pull, we need to get "The Birthday", a 2004 film in which Corey stars, released for distribution in the US!)
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on November 1, 2013
I ended up purchasing this book because it was recommended when I ordered the River Phoenix biography. I saw that it had a bunch of positive reviews and decided to give it a shot.

Being 32 years old, movies like Stand by Me, the Goonies, and Lost Boys (all of which I recently watched coincidentally) are amongst my favorites of all time.

After reading the first chapter in the book, I couldn't put it down and ended up spending the entire day finishing it as I nursed a massive hangover.

The first thing which stands out about this book is how well written it is. It's done in a very conversational tone which makes it easily digestible and enjoyable to read.

The subject matter, on the other hand, is another thing altogether. Corey spares little detail in depicting his abusive upbringing, the horrors of child abuse in Hollywood, and his previous drug problem. I was appalled at the treatment of these child actors by the people they trusted.

It is horrible what "the industry" did to these two child actors and it is truly unfortunate that it ended up costing one of them their life.

Despite some of the darker material in the book there are a lot of fond memories as Corey describes working on the set of the Goonies, Stand by Me, and the other movies. It's really interesting to get a true behind the scenes look at some of the magic that went into these movies.

As I progressed through the book, I developed a huge amount of respect for this person and the level of maturity he had at such an early age. I am so pleased that he was able to clean up his life and find happiness.

Corey - if you're reading this review, and based upon what you say in your book, you probably are, I send you the best wishes for a long happy life with your son. Your book was eye opening for me and I want to thank you for writing it.
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32 of 43 people found the following review helpful
on October 29, 2013
Corey Feldman and I both share an interesting trait in common, we both use his filmography as a means of charting the timeline of our lives (well to a point, for, um, both of us.) Seriously, when St. Martin’s press kindly offered a review copy of Feldman’s newly published memoir, Coreyography, I figured why not, I knew I loved a bunch of his movies and was curious to read how he reflected on his life to this point. But in the preface, when he writes, “I’ve always marked the chronology of my life not by the year, but by the film…”, it really struck a chord with me. Looking back I’ve personally done the same thing, using movies to mark the years, but when I consider my childhood and adolescence, Corey Feldman stands out in so many of my favorite films. Gremlins, Goonies, Friday the 13th 4&5, Stand By Me, The Lost Boys, License to Drive, The ‘Burbs, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and yes, even if not especially Rock and Roll High School Forever. These are all films I’ve watched a million times, and all of them very clearly chart my time growing up in the 80s and 90s. I was also an avid fan of the Bad News Bears sitcom when it aired in repeats on Nickelodeon, and watched my fair share of Madame as well.

When I found my copy of the book on my porch this past Thursday I was excited, but also not really sure what I was getting myself into. Sure, I love most of Feldman’s 80s era films, but I’ll be honest I’m not a devotee of his personal life. In fact I’ve sort of purposely tried to ignore the press on him dating all the way back to when my mom would clip out the articles on him and lifelong friend Corey Haim from her copies of People magazine. She thought I’d find them cool, but I really didn’t want to know about his drug busts or legendary hotel-trashing parties. So I was in the dark for the majority of his big sound bites over the past decade or so, whether it be his comments on Michael Jackson, his declaration of war on Hollywood pedophilia, or even his reunion with Haim on The Two Coreys and the bombshells about molestation and rape. Blissfully ignorant. So when I cracked the cover and dug into the preface(filling myself in on all of the personal Corey stuff I managed to miss over the years), I again asked myself, what was I getting into?

First and foremost, the memoir is a very quick read, light and breezy with a conversational tone that belies the fact that Feldman wrote it himself (I mean seriously, so many memoirs are ghost or “co-“ written.) It also skirts dramatic license when considering the prose. I’ve read a handful of memoirs and am consistently bugged by the way the authors chose to fill their recollections with an absurd amount of detail and massive amounts of quoted conversation. As much as I’d love to trust their writing, I spend a lot of time thinking and writing about the past and know that when you get right down to it, very few of us have the ability to remember in exacting details the events of our lives. Feldman doesn’t fall trap to this and stays true to the snippets of memory, which is both refreshing and honest.

Circling back to the “light and breezy”, well, that’s just as much of a positive as it is a negative. When you get to the content, the book reads like a Cliff’s notes edition. He scurries from topic to topic, only barely touching on any one movie or experience for a moment before flitting onto the next. For anyone who is a fan of his movies, don’t hold your breath for much in the way of behind the scenes tidbits. He devotes a decent amount of time to the filming of the Goonies, but honestly, most of that time is spent describing himself lusting after the opportunity to meet his childhood hero Michael Jackson on set. Similarly, for those hoping for a lot of behind the scenes stories with his best friend Corey Haim, well, there honestly isn’t much of that either. When it comes to Haim, Feldman spends a lot of time dancing around the rape Haim suffered on the set of Lucas, and the rest painting a portrait of a friend who seemed to annoy way, way more than ever endear. In fact, Feldman seems to be distancing himself from Haim with this memoir, down playing their friendship.

For those looking for the gritty details of Feldman’s days spent snorting or injecting every drug within reach or details into his sexual escapades either consensual or non, it’s all there, but written in such a flippant tone that it all ends up seeming so very inconsequential. It certainly isn’t a tell-all, as he (probably) wisely chose not to name, accuse or implicate anyone in his own or Corey Haim’s experiences with molestation and rape, though he does spend a lengthy portion of the book addressing the abuse he suffered at the hands of his mother. Speaking of tone, I was also surprised how easily Feldman relates the stories of his life as if he were speaking about them as they happened. He doesn’t really look back and dig into his life, examining and offering up a perspective more wise with distance and age. He tone is in the moment, as defiant as when he was on the set of The ‘Burbs and was approached by Joe Dante and Carrie Fisher about his drug usage, or as childlike and naive when consistently pestering Stephen Spielberg for a meet and greet with Michael Jackson on the set of the Goonies. Again, this is both boon and bane, equally putting the reader in the moment, but also lacking much in the way of depth.

It’s not to say that there’s nothing to the book, or that it wasn’t and interesting and entertaining read, it’s just, well, light. There is enough here fans of his films will sure to gleam a fun detail or two about some of their favorite films, but don’t expect anything groundbreaking. All in all, the book feels like a really good outline for a much longer, more detailed look at Feldman’s life. Who knows, maybe in another ten or fifteen years he’ll use Coreyography as a guide to sit down and write it.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on November 4, 2013
I listened to the audio version of this book read by Corey himself. I highly recommend it. Whenever he's reading what someone else said in quotations, he uses different voices. Such as Michael Jackson which his imitation is spot-on. His voices are great. The audio book just flows and his voice grabs your attention. He is definitely not a monotone reader and will not put you to sleep. And the content of the book blew me away. Who knew that the entertainment industry houses pedophiles? I didn't. And Corey's childhood just made me want to hug him as a child. Never a dull moment and I couldn't wait until I had to drive somewhere so I could listen to more of the book.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on November 13, 2013
I have to commend Corey Feldman for writing this book. When I first heard it was coming out, I immediately pre-ordered a Kindle copy. I was a young actor in the 1980's - I started with the New York scene and ended up in Los Angeles. I was young, naïve, vulnerable and had stars in my eyes. My career started in my late adolescence and I booked one thing after another. I ended up co-starring and guest-starring on a number on TV series and films in the early to late 1980's. The joy of each gig also brought the terror of "who would say what to me" or "who would try what". I was told by a casting director that the only reason I got the role was because I had a nice ass. Another showed me an old headshot that he kept concealed in his top desk draw waiting for the day that he would call me in ... it was creepy and frightening. I would go home each night to my small apartment in Studio City and drink myself to sleep. I was a little older than Corey and handled myself well, as frightening as it all seemed to me. I retained my virginity and stayed sane. My strong Italian-Catholic background kept me grounded and fortunately, for me, I escaped Dodge. I started to transition from child actor to adult roles and the transition was awkward. I was warned that if I left LA, I was taking a razor blade to my career (which was on the brink of series regular work). I did not care. I left LA, returned to NY to my family and went to school. I was unharmed and unscathed .... I was one of the lucky ones.

My heart went out to Corey reading this book. I saw him once in passing at the studio with Corey Haim and I knew who he was. They looked shabby and I remember judging them. Oh boy ... that difficult lesson - NEVER JUDGE A BOOK BY IT'S COVER! Had I only known then what I know now. What unnecessary and unfortunate suffering they had to endure. While Corey Haim is now at peace and probably smiling down on his friend, I am happy to see Corey Feldman clean and sober. His little boy looks precious and at the end of the book, contentment pops off the pages. This is God's grace after Corey graduated from the School of Hard Knocks. The book itself is an easy read and well written! I highly recommend it - Corey is one of the few brave souls, at risk of his career, to come forward and tell the damn truth about how the industry can destroy children. Every stage mother and father should read it. Thanks again Corey!! You Rock and I am praying for you! Beautiful book and work.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on December 8, 2013
What a great read! He is a great writer and really digs deep into his dark past. I was so moved by his story that I finished it in 2 days. Its an easy read too, so it was not a problem to pick it up during my lunch break. My heart breaks for him and Corey for what they endured. I think a lot of that Pedophilia still happens in Hollywood but its not talked about much. I appreciate that he is speaking up about it. At first, I was irritated that he never mentions the pedophile who abused Corey Haim's on the set of Lucas but he could get sued for slander. Who is a Hollywood Mogul and was on the set of Lucas?? Charlie Sheen? I don't know but it makes me wonder. He talks a lot about pedophiles around him but changed all the names of his abusers so I had to do my own investigation. In his book he talks about a guy named Tony Burnham and gives details about what he looks like, and what he has done in his life. Again, his name was changed and I found out that his real name is Dominik Brascia. You can google him and I found out that he was Corey Feldman's roommate, was in a movie with both Corey's called Buster and he was in the Friday the 13th : A New Beginning movie and was the only overweight actor in that movie. I found out the guest casting director for the Bad News Bears was Bobby Hoffman, luckily for him there is not much news about him ( named in the book Ralph Kaufman, Bill Kaufman). I know Corey can't name these people but if you really investigate you will find the truth under your nose.
Overall I really enjoyed reading his stories about his life and how he tried to overcome so many injustices. His story just broke my heart, and Im really glad that he wrote this book so that he can heal.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I happened upon this book while trying to use up an Audible promotional credit. It's one of those books you secretly listen to and think it's going to be terrible, but it's actually kind of scandal-light and worth a listen while you're cleaning the house.

Corey Feldman reads his book. His reading is... interesting. First, his character voices are very good. All though, you soon find that most everyone basically has an Brooklin'ish New York accent - I don't know how else to describe it. His Michael Jackson impersonation is impeccable. It sounds just like Michael, which is scary! The problem I had is he's definitely adopted the E Entertainment-Biography voice inflection with all that drama and intensity. "Everything is read. In an annoying way. It's down RIGHT. Irritating. His inflection. Stops AND starts. It will drive you. LITERALLY. Crazy." If you want to know what I mean, listen to the Audible sample. It works in places, but an entire book read that way is wrong and says a lot about Corey Feldman, a child who was practically born into the business. He doesn't say it in this book, but in an interview, that he didn't come to Hollywood hoping to break into the entertainment industry and fulfill a dream. This life was chosen for him by his parents. It's interesting when you think about that.

Corey Feldman was really low on my radar as a kid. I enjoyed the mega hits he was in - Lost Boys, Goonies, Stand By Me, Gremlins. That was about it. He was never a character or actor I liked. He was the tough kid with an attitude. Reading his autobiography I had empathy for him. He seriously had a bad childhood. His choices haven't always been the best with no real roll model helping to show him what a loving family is. But his book came off a little too much self-pity. Everything happens to him with just fleeting apologies for his actions, though he does acknowledge some of his wrong doings.

He was a really good actor as a kid, but I think it's going to be impossible for him to have any sort of come back. There's too much real talent in Hollywood these days and his time is over. I can't get what goes through his mind with his music. The stuff I've listened to is hardly understandable or musical. To each their own. I'm glad he has a creative outlet. But he's a bit out of touch with reality. Drug use does that, I guess. I've seen him in interviews and in one he'll act like the model reformed actor. The other he's like a Michael Jackson wanna be, even using some of MJ's own words. He's clearly still lost in my eyes.

Of course there's pedophile scandal, Corey Haim drama, Michael Jackson dish, drug use, the lows of a child actor that make this book oddly interesting. Honestly, I didn't realize how desired he was as a child actor, or that Steven Spielberg had singled him out. He's definitely led a full life. Worth a listen if you're on a long flight, traveling, or cleaning your house.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The first time I saw The Goonies I fell in love with Mouth, with Corey Feldman. Those pre-teen celebrity crushes are intense, so as I got older and more logical, that interest in Feldman never disappeared; it only dissipated. However, the more I read or saw of him as an adult made me think he was crazy, from his dressing up like Michael Jackson, to his stint on The Surreal Life, to his music career. This book explains why.

Corey Feldman was a child star when it was especially dangerous to be a child star, when Drew Barrymore and River Phoenix were on the rise. Add two greedy, drug-addicted parents who used him as a cash cow and punching bag, an industry riddled with vice, and an insatiable need to be loved, and it is no wonder Feldman had it hard and turned out to be a little odd. At least he is still alive, which is more than some of his contemporaries can say.

The great thing about this book is that it gives Feldman a chance to tell his own story, and he seems pretty normal considering all he has been through. The passages about Michael Jackson, Feldman's idol and friend who had a similar rough upbringing, are bright spots, rare moments when he could be a kid and have a good time. It is no wonder the cover photo, while dark and brooding, features Feldman with Jackson-like hair, an attempt to capture lightness through the pain.

I read this book in a 24 hour period. The writing is very good, not only illustrating a life but with an easy, conversational style which makes you feel like you're talking to the author.
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