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Roger Corman Collection (Bloody Mama / A Bucket of Blood / The Trip / Premature Burial / The Young Racers / The Wild Angels / Gas-s-s / X) (1967)

Shelley Winters , Don Stroud , Roger Corman  |  NR |  DVD
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (102 customer reviews)

List Price: $39.98
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X: The Man with X-Ray Eyes   $2.99 $9.99
Bloody Mama   $2.99 $9.99
Wild In The Streets   $2.99 $9.99

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Roger Corman Collection (Bloody Mama / A Bucket of Blood / The Trip / Premature Burial / The Young Racers / The Wild Angels / Gas-s-s / X) + Roger Corman's Cult Classics Triple Feature (Attack of the Crab Monsters / War of the Satellites / Not of This Earth)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Shelley Winters, Don Stroud, Peter Fonda, Susan Strasberg, Nancy Sinatra
  • Directors: Roger Corman
  • Writers: Charles B. Griffith, Charles Beaumont, Don Peters, Edgar Allan Poe, George Armitage
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Box set, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English (Stereo)
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 4
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • DVD Release Date: September 18, 2007
  • Run Time: 641 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (102 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000SK5ZFC
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #89,318 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Roger Corman Collection (Bloody Mama / A Bucket of Blood / The Trip / Premature Burial / The Young Racers / The Wild Angels / Gas-s-s / X)" on IMDb

Special Features

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Roger Corman's name has become synonymous with cheap B-movies--but the cunning, vitality, and astounding variety of movies in The Roger Corman Collection demonstrates that money has nothing to do with making a dynamic movie. Corman is best known as the producer who launched some of the greatest directors of the 1970s (like Scorsese and Coppola), but these eight movies prove Corman himself had directorial chops. He has no signature visual style, but the movies are united by Corman's restless intelligence and--perhaps surprising to viewers who think of exploitation movies as vapid--moral consciousness. The earliest movie is one of the best: The black comedy A Bucket of Blood satirizes the beatnik counterculture, but many of its jabs can be applied to every rebellious trend since. But the strangely sympathetic performance of Dick Miller as a socially inept would-be artist/accidental murderer resonates most. Miller went on to appear in bit parts on many other Corman movies (you'll see him several times in this collection), but this performance fully captures his unique charisma. The Premature Burial and X: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes, both starring Ray Milland (The Lost Weekend), are more conventional horror science fiction movies. Burial is a sterling example of Corman's adaptations of Edgar Allan Poe stories, with lavish (by Corman's standards) production values and an increasingly creepy plot. X, in which a scientist gains x-ray vision, begins as a naughty joke and builds to a downright metaphysical finale. Also made in the same year (1963) is the weakest film in the collection, The Young Racers, which was constructed around footage shot of actual Grand Prix races in Europe. The mid-1960s saw Corman exploring the rising youth cultures and creating some genuinely remarkable work: The Wild Angels, starring Peter Fonda, Nancy Sinatra, and Bruce Dern, portrays a Hell's Angels-style motorcycle gang whose unrepentant nihilism reaches a genuinely troubling peak. The movie paints a caustic picture yet withholds judgment, almost taunting the viewer to draw a moral line. Similarly, The Trip, though it features some cheesy visual effects, is an accurate and uncritical depiction of a man (Fonda again) taking his first acid trip; the movie neither advocates nor condemns, but captures both the ups and downs of LSD. Bloody Mama is a gangster picture set in the Depression, but the incestuous psychosexual landscape of Ma Barker (played with zest by Shelley Winters) and her sons (including a young Robert DeNiro) could only have been portrayed with such unsettling vividness in 1970. And finally, there's Gas-s-s!, one of the last movies Corman directed, a freewheeling allegorical odyssey in which a military experiment kills everyone over 25, turning society into a strange patchwork of subcultures. There's really no other movie like it, and it may capture the 1960s more accurately than the Baby Boom generation finds comfortable. Corman's oeuvre deserves to be rediscovered and reexamined. The Roger Corman Collection includes a few interviews with Corman, who proves himself thoughtful and unpretentious. All in all, an important (and enjoyable!) addition to any cinephile's library. --Bret Fetzer

Product Description

Disc 1 Side A: Bloody Mama Disc 1 Side B: A Bucket of Blood

Disc 2 Side A: Gas-s-s Disc 2 Side B: The Trip

Disc 3 Side A: Premature Burial, The Disc 3 Side B: X: The Man With X-Ray Eyes

Disc 4 Side A: The Young Racers Disc 4 Side B: The Wild Angels


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Available at last on DVD but difficult to find January 30, 2005
During the 1960s, American International primarily introduced low-budgeted movies geared usually for drive-ins. By some mistake, "Wild in the Streets" turned out to be both a hit and a perennial cult favorite. Deservedly so. It is probably one of the most subversive satires ever produced for the American screen. In September of 2004, it was finally released as part of a double-sided MGM Midnight Movies selection on DVD. (The flip side is one of Roger Corman's worst movies, GAS-S-S-S-S, a sophomoric comedy doubtless inspired by "Wild in the Street"'s success. Skip it.)

What is particularly strange is that "Wild in the Streets" appears to have been unreleased as soon as it was released. If you check MGM's website, you will not find it listed in MGM's inventory. Nor will you find it listed as available on Amazon or most places. In fact, the only retail place online you can find it is at BestBuy. However, it does not appear to be available at most of BestBuy's actual stores. Did the idea of a fascistic dictatorship taking over America somehow offend the current Administration or offend executives at MGM? Just a question since I'm not privy to why it's being censored.

At any rate, I would suggest that the movie's admirers buy the DVD when or where they can, since they might not have a second chance. The movie itself was released in 1968 while the Vietnam War raged on -- and on and on and on. This is important to understanding the film in its historical context. "Wild in the Streets" has several premises. The first is that the old fogies in Washington are destroying the country. Although Vietnam is not mentioned (read Iraq, if you want to bring the premise up to date), the draft certainly is on the moviemakers's minds.
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63 of 76 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
Ever conscious of cashing in on whatever trend might have been fashionable at the time, American International Pictures (AIP) focused their sights on the ever-growing youth movement of the mid to late 60s with this frightening (if you were over 60) tale of youthful revolution in Wild in the Streets (1968). Directed by Barry Shear, whose primary credits include TV shows like "The Man from U.N.C.L.E.", "Ironside", and "Hawaii Five-O", to name a few, the film stars Christopher Jones (The Looking Glass War), an actor once thought by many to be perhaps the next James Dean or Marlon Brando, but whose fortunes and star potential faded due to, what some speculate, the strain of having to live up to the expectations beyond his grasp...oh yeah, that and the all the drugs, as highlighted in `Christopher Jones: The E! True Hollywood Story'...also appearing is Oscar winner Shelley Winters (The Diary of Anne Frank, The Night of the Hunter, Lolita), Diane Varsi (I Never Promised You a Rose Garden), Hal Holbrook (Creepshow), Millie Perkins (The Diary of Anne Frank), Ed Begley (12 Angry Men), Bert Freed (Nevada Smith), and Richard Pryor (Silver Streak, Stir Crazy).

As the story begins, we witness an intelligent and precocious boy named Max Flatow (played by Barry Williams, better know as the character Greg Brady, from The Brady Bunch), Jr. grow into a disillusioned young adult who decides to leave home, severing his family ties, and make it own his own (given his mother, played by Winters, I didn't blame him). By the age of 22 we learn he's not only changed his name to Max Frost, but that he's also become a famous recording star, and with the help of his entourage (none over the age of 25), become the head of a multi-million dollar empire.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars cult classic par excellence February 6, 2001
Format:VHS Tape
leonard maltin needs a thicker pair of glasses to realize the cult classic we have on our hands here. no, it's not gone with the wind. nor is it apocalypse now. but in terms of capturing that cool attitude of the pre-hippie 60's, mixing fantastic garage rock/surf rock, and a crazy premise (rock star takes over the country by enlisting his fanbase - the youth of america), with an abundance of narcotics thrown in for good measure...you can't beat this one of a kind film. this is one of those movies that few people know about. those that know it though will concur that it's one of the coolest films of the late 60's, albeit somewhat kitsch. just wish i could find the soundtrack. another plus is that it's richard pryor's first movie ever, yet only in a cameo role. tarantino loved this film so much that he tried to track down christopher jones (who had apparently gone awol since the film's release) to play one of the leads in an as-yet-to-be-made pulp fiction. he managed to find him, but jones turned him down. travolta later was asked and he accepted the role that would jumpstart his career again. to put things in perspective, in '68, jones was billed as the next james dean. he unfortunately disappeared from hollywood never to make another film. he was one cool cat that couldn't dig the system...you dig?
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Verified Purchase
Ever conscious of cashing in on whatever trend might have been fashionable at the time, American International Pictures (AIP) focused their sights on the ever-growing youth movement of the mid to late 60s with this frightening (if you were over 60) tale of youthful revolution in Wild in the Streets (1968). Directed by Barry Shear, whose primary credits include TV shows like "The Man from U.N.C.L.E.", "Ironside", and "Hawaii Five-O", to name a few, the film stars Christopher Jones (The Looking Glass War), an actor once thought by many to be perhaps the next James Dean or Marlon Brando, but whose fortunes and star potential faded due to, what some speculate, the strain of having to live up to the expectations beyond his grasp...oh yeah, that and the all the drugs, as highlighted in `Christopher Jones: The E! True Hollywood Story'...also appearing is Oscar winner Shelley Winters (The Diary of Anne Frank, The Night of the Hunter, Lolita), Diane Varsi (I Never Promised You a Rose Garden), Hal Holbrook (Creepshow), Millie Perkins (The Diary of Anne Frank), Ed Begley (12 Angry Men), Bert Freed (Nevada Smith), and Richard Pryor (Silver Streak, Stir Crazy).

As the story begins, we witness an intelligent and precocious boy named Max Flatow (played by Barry Williams, better know as the character Greg Brady, from The Brady Bunch), Jr. grow into a disillusioned young adult who decides to leave home, severing his family ties, and make it own his own (given his mother, played by Winters, I didn't blame him). By the age of 22 we learn he's not only changed his name to Max Frost, but that he's also become a famous recording star, and with the help of his entourage (none over the age of 25), become the head of a multi-million dollar empire.
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