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Cornerstone Cooking: Learn to love your leftovers. Paperback – March 16, 2012


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Editorial Reviews

Review

"I fell hard for [Cornerstone Cooking] and I think it will be motivating my meals for many months to come." - Marisa, foodinjars.com

"Of course, leave it to a blogger to come up with the first cookbook I've seen in eons that is actually useful." - Endlesssimmer.com

"I have never seen a cookbook laid out in such a unique yet totally logical way." -Dan, thefoodinmybeard.com
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 156 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (March 16, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1469966662
  • ISBN-13: 978-1469966663
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 7.9 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,258,322 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Nick has been writing about cooking and inspiring people to cook more at home for the last five years through his popular cooking blog, Macheesmo.com.

Nick grew up in Wyoming and graduated from Yale University with a degree in philosophy. His current philosophy is that homemade food is best, and he is passionate about teaching people how to make cooking at home an enjoyable and worthwhile activity. In short, he gets people to put down the menus and pick up the spatulas!

Nick lives in Denver, Colorado now with his wife and official taste-tester, Betsy, their dog, Porter, and their cat, Tipsy.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By True Axiom on April 12, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I keep three cookbooks on my shelf: Alton Brown's two titles and The Joy of Cooking. The first two taught me how to cook, and Joy is there for quick reference. "Does this contain eggs?" "Nope! No eggs!" In general I find my recipes on cooking blogs, like the author's own Macheesmo, and Alton Brown teaches me methods.

Cornerstone Cooking comes close to being a method book. It's built around a core idea--using your leftovers for new dishes--but it devolves into a normal cookbook too quickly. What you get is a few pages on the concept, followed by eight "examples": master ingredients that produce copious leftovers easily appropriated into other dishes. Let's get practical for a moment: I've made about a half-dozen of these recipes, and they work. They're of the quality you expect if you've ever made anything from the blog. If you haven't, they're good recipes: creative, easy to understand, well written. There's a slight lack of pictures. Not every recipe gets one. This is a sadness: I am 86% more likely to make a recipe that comes with a picture.

The chicken and dumplings, in particular, is spectacular. People were declaring it the best thing they'd ever eaten.

That said, I was looking for a bit more philosophy. I was looking for the author to do more with the concept: leftovers. I know, it's got a blog and forum associated with it, designed to accomplish this, but I missed it in the book. Eight cornerstones are extrapolated upon, and that's great, but I wanted suggestions of other things that could apply to this method. I also wish more of them were immediately useful: flank steak, one of the cornerstones, is ludicrously expensive in my parts, and ice cream is cheaper to buy than make most weeks.

I'd recommend the book, all told, though, because it's teaching a valuable skill: how to make things from other things. It's a modular method of cooking, and this really helps you pinch the pennies.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Not necessary on March 27, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Written and photographed in great style by the amazing food blogger Nick Evans, this is a great addition to any practical chef's bookshelf. The book has a unique focus in that rather than just assuming you have all the ingredients you need it builds out from central dishes anyone can make. I've followed his blog for years and loved the recipes I've made from it.

I'll be pulling this out regularly from now on, including tonight!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Viky on March 28, 2012
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I was so excited to order this book, and being a long time follower of the blog "macheesmo.com" This book has many great stories, tips, and recipes. I think it makes every day cooking a bit easier with options on when you could use store-bought, or partially cooked products, to mix in with the leftovers you have at home. The pictures are beautiful. I have nothing but compliments to the chef!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By LawStudent on April 10, 2012
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It's not too often you find a cookbook that actually recognizes that most people don't have 8 different kinds of paprika and 12 different salts in the cupboards. Cornerstone Cooking is excellent in that it gives you simple methods to create meals you actually want to eat all week long. I am usually intimidated by cookbooks but these recipes and tips are written with an almost conversational tone, you quickly feel as if the author is a knowledgeable friend just trying to help you out with some tips and tricks. It's also comforting to see that most meals don't require me to run out to the grocery store just to pick up a couple of uncommon (and pricey) items. Nearly all the meals I've made thus far included ingredients readily available in my very basic kitchen.

I would recommend Cornerstone Cooking for anyone who has to balance cooking family dinners with a busy weekly schedule.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Johnson on April 2, 2012
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I love the premise of this cookbook and have practiced a similar cooking style to keep the family fed. The cornerstone principle helps you make delicious meals all week long while keeping the time spent cooking down. The only thing keeping this from 5 stars is the lack of photos for every recipe.
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