Correction: A Novel (Vintage International) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$13.14
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $2.86 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Correction: A Novel (Vintage International) Paperback – March 9, 2010


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.14
$5.99 $5.99
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Frequently Bought Together

Correction: A Novel (Vintage International) + Concrete (Vintage International) + The Loser: A Novel
Price for all three: $38.77

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Vintage International
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage (March 9, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400077605
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400077601
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #332,012 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Astonishingly original, a composition of strange new beauty.”
The Nation
 
“As readers we are in the relentless grip of Bernhard. One marvels at the consistency of his austere vision.”
The New York Times Book Review
 
“Remarkable. . . . Bernhard’s prose is lapidary and translucent.”
Times Literary Supplement (London)
 
“Little by little, with supernatural patience, prodigious cunning and craft—like Joseph Heller in Catch-22—Bernhard fashions an original angle of vision that transforms our understanding. We see elephants beside us in a room where no one mentions elephants.”
—John Edgar Wideman, O, The Oprah Magazine

Language Notes

Text: English, German (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Vladimir on September 2, 2001
Format: Paperback
Bernhard's novel "Correction" tells us the story of two friends. The main character, Roithamer, commit suicide (as we know from the first page of the book) and his friend (the person who tells the story) take charge of his legacy: A huge mass of calculations and thinkings about the construction of a Cone (in the center of a forest called Kobernauss) for the "supreme happiness" of Roithamer' sister (who is expected to dwell in it). Following this main idea Bernhard writes a superb novel dealing with the loneliness of an exceptional man in a stupid, brutal and destructive society that consider mad to those people with true artistic and intellectual interests. Strong thoughts and strong beauty are the main virtues of this book. I have read almost all the works by Thomas Bernhard and this one, I think, is the kernel of all his production. It is, maybe, his greatest masterpiece (in narrative) besides his five-volume autobiography. We encounter, here, for example, that wild irony and humour of his plays for the scene and his deep view of the world. Yes, "depth" is the magical word dealing with Bernhard works. And against the depth is all the superfluidity and foolishness of the surroundings in our way of life. Superfluidity which threatens us in every moment wanting to kill us intellectually and spiritually. Only knowledge can save us but then (considering knowledge only) our life is difficult when not terrible.
I will say nothing of Mdme. Wilkins translation as I think that there is no alternative for reading this novel in English. Translating Bernhard is very difficult. Long sentences, with periodic and obsessive motives which repeat and repeat producing an amazing and incredible effect. Bernhard is a master of rhythm and precision and his style is a musical one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
I consider Correction as one the best works of his author. I've read Miguel Saenz' translation into Spanish and I've found it excellent. I can't quite say wether English traslation is as good or it's not. The main Bernhard obsession are shown in this book. His peculiar, rather tough style is displayed in all its intensity as well. Amongst the former the suicide topic and the relationship between the man and Nature are worth mentioning. Among the latter, I guess those endlessly soliloques whose secret only Bernhard seems to know, would be the most characteristic. The plot is based upon Wittgenstein's life or, rather, upon Wittgenstein's philosophy. The method of this philospher has been described as a spiral -rather than lineal way of thought. He rounds the same issues all the time but getting deeper and deeper every time. In Bernhard prose, the same process can be verified. In a lineal following of the plot, not many things can be registered. But the thoughts of the protagonist are able to discover always a new view of those few issues he is obsessed with. At last, the suicide of his friend (known for the reader since the first page) can be interpreted as his last step in his impossible way from civilization (in wich he has been thrown against his will) back to Nature. Highly significative in this regard is the place where the suicide takes place: a spot in the woods exactly in the half of the way between the town and his house in the mountains. The style and the strange use of the lenguage can be interpreted in the same way. Wittgenstein once said: "When you can't talk about things is better to keep silence." Bernhard try to fight this assumption by writing.Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
This novel is essentially about a man (two men, really, in sequence although at times it feels like the narrator is of one piece) in a little dark room who cannot turn his brain off and has an incessant need to share it with you (the reader). I found the passage about the stuffing of the big black bird to be incredibly hilarious. People who aspire to be well-read must put Thomas Bernhard on the top of their reading list. Adjectives like obsession and neurotic don't do this particular book justice. I've read most of Bernhard's books (as translated in English) and this is certainly one of his strongest. I recommend this book to everyone -- graduate students, widows, orphans, the mentally ill, little children. Five stars absolutely.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Bartolo on January 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
I had read "Wittgenstein's Nephew" and "The Loser" and was prepared to regard Bernhard as interesting and innovative but not compelling, certainly not the Austrian novelist Handke is; but a Bernhard fan urged this on me. Even though I usually favor comic novels, and value richness of language and varied sentence structure per se, I think Bernhard's run-on style has more pertinence and dramatic force in this tragic tale than in his more humorous efforts. This was a memorable experience on two levels--the level of its subject matter and the level of the aptness and suppleness of Bernhard's craft. If you haven't read any Bernhard before, start with this one. The two Muldoons (!) reviewing here are right on target.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 31, 1997
Format: Paperback
In Correction, Thomas Bernhard arranges an interlocution between poet and thinker, between his own protagonist's theories and Heideggerrian thought. Correction seems to undertake a "mock-up" of Heideggerian thought, a parody of Heidegger's essays on "Clearing," "Origin," "Thinking." Inasmuch as there are similarities between the novel and Heidegger's essays, a "fictional-critique" of Heidegger becomes apparent. Essentially, Bernhard's novel evolves its critique not through close examination or critical analysis, but by embracing Heideggerian thought whenever Roithamer (the protagonist) attempts to enact it--in short, making it "literal." Even where Heidegger cautions that this poetic space of Origin must remain beyond the temporal capabilities of the present, Bernhard makes it exigent in his text, makes it concrete. Bernhard, however, is less interested in showing the weaknesses or contradictions in Heidegger's thinking than in illustrating the results of its realization, its literalization. Roithamer, in fact, models his architectural plans to build a Cone in the middle of a forest on Heidegger's writings on architecture and his insistence on the "mutual articulation" of city, surrounding landscape, and human culture. Similarly, throughout the novel, Roithamer is engaged in a rigorous correction of all the ideas which he had previously written in his architectural journals. Yet--having read the accumulated logic of Roithamer's dissembling--I was not left with a reduced and refined record of his thinking at the end of the novel, but ironically with an excess of meaning, the architectural plan including all its corrected ideas. In effect, as a reader, I was presented with the residue of meaning: a hard copy of the correction of Roithamer's "originary" thinking, a protuberant eulogy for the ideas which cannot be cancelled into oblivion.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?