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Cosmic Egg

October 26, 2009 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:55
30
2
3:45
30
3
3:04
30
4
3:47
30
5
5:40
30
6
4:09
30
7
4:04
30
8
4:00
30
9
4:50
30
10
5:42
30
11
4:45
30
12
6:02
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 23, 2009
  • Release Date: October 26, 2009
  • Label: Modular
  • Copyright: (C) 2009 Modular Recordings
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 53:43
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002T07DAE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (96 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #37,583 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Nick Wagner on November 10, 2009
Format: Audio CD
I waited a while before writing this review, mainly because I believe you can't really judge an album until you listen to it multiple times and let it sink in.

First and foremost, Wolfmother is constantly berated as a band that just rips off classic rock. Supporters say no way, haters say yes it's obvious, and I really could care less. Nearly all music is just ripping off the music that came before it. Modern "rock" is derivative of classic rock, heavy metal in all its forms owes its debt to early Black Sabbath, rap is the successor of early hip-hop (also using samples of classic rock), pop and dance is highly influenced by Motown and new wave, and country is straight from folk rock. My favorite music is classic rock, and even I know that wouldn't exist without the blues of the 1930's. What I'm getting at is the line between "influenced by" and "ripping off" doesn't really exist because you can argue either way and you'd be right. Personally I think that as long as the music grabs you in some way, it's doing its job and that's all that matters.

That's enough of that. Onto the review!

Wolfmother's self-titled debut was excellent, with some great riffs and epic wailing vocals. It was like an album straight out of the late 60's/early 70's, reminiscent of Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple and Blue Cheer.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By William Merrill VINE VOICE on October 27, 2009
Format: Audio CD
The heaviosity flows freely on this new Wolfmother album. (Or is it heavitude?) But I like the fact that this is hard rock as opposed to Heavy Metal. In other words, it's filled with loud and heavy electric guitars and high-register lead vocals, but the songs don't bludgeon listeners into submission. For one thing, there's a variety in tempos on the Egg -- it's not all freight train, sometimes it's a limo. I hear some of what one of the other reviewers described as "more Sabbath than Zep" on the album, in songs like "10000 Feet," but I still hear some Zeppelin in several of the songs too. My take on these homages to past "rock gods" is that Wolfmother maintains its originality while incorporating elements that worked so well for great genre bands in previous decades. It's something I liked about Wolfmother before, and I'm still enjoying it with this new incarnation.

Regarding the Deluxe Edition, it's interesting to me that the one-CD version has 12 songs on the disc, but when they added the 4 extra tracks for the Deluxe set, they decided to split up the songs 8 and 8 (eight tracks on each CD). And the extra tracks are not just stuck on at the end, they are integrated into the song sequence with the original 12 cuts. So maybe the band is just presenting two different versions of the album? "Shorter" and "Longer?" I'm interested to learn more about that situation. Anyway, I'm glad I went for the Deluxe - the four extra songs sound just as good to me as the other twelve!
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Jason Bee on October 26, 2009
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
Just downloaded it and gave it a listen...I got the "deluxe" edition - a double album, sixteen songs, same price as the regular version here on Amazon - good value. I was/am a big fan of the original Wolfmother lineup, so I was a little skeptical about the effect the new guys would have and what they would bring. At this point I am pleasantly surprised, and now realize that the "Wolfmother sound" is pretty much all Andrew Stockdale - his singing, songwriting and guitar playing are all very distinctive. He has said this album would be heavier, and it is, which I like. Overall the sound is slightly more polished and maybe even a little tighter than the first album. If you liked the first album I don't thihk you'll be disappointed.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Colin Logue on October 27, 2009
Format: Audio CD
This is a much more mature album but maintains the full on rock influences of their eponymous effort plus a little bit of adventurousness.

The opener 'California Queen' is followed by 'New Moon Rising' and it's not hard to see why both these tracks have been released as singles. From this great opening pair Wolfmother continue the hard rocking with 'Sundial' offering some Hendrixesque guitar. 'In The Morning' slows things down but only for a moment. Hardly time to catch your breath before '10.000 Feet' and the title track have one scratching their head for another influence superbly executed. Think of Budgie circa 1972 and it is very difficult not to draw the conclusion that Stockdale & Co have been exposed to this brilliantly neglected British band.

'Far Away' brings a temporary halt to the sonic barrage with a beautifully crafted song leaving the feeling that you've heard this before but can't remember where or when. 'In The Castle' opens with an almost prog keyboard intro and psychedelic feel before Stockdale hits his strapes again. The concluding track 'Violence of the Sun' is the most surprising with the band sounding really comfortable with one another playing a mix of jazz and r'n'b with 'wall of sound' drumming. This is a new improved Wolfmother which will please old fans and probably gain some new ones.

A definite step forward while maintaining the appeal of their first album. The new line-up gel well together but as before AS is the core and driving force behind Wolfmother.
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