Cotonou Club

April 13, 2011 | Format: MP3

$7.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:38
30
2
3:40
30
3
3:51
30
4
3:58
30
5
2:48
30
6
5:02
30
7
4:24
30
8
4:56
30
9
3:21
30
10
3:28
30
11
4:42


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: April 12, 2011
  • Label: Strut
  • Copyright: 2011 Strut
  • Total Length: 44:48
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004W3L4JM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #192,940 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By The Nomadic Tribesman on August 7, 2011
Format: Audio CD
No one could really criticize you if you didn't expect this newly recorded album to be as good as the rereleases of Poly-Rythmo's 1960's and 1970's material. I too was skeptical mainly because the bar was set so high by the collections on Soundway and Analog Africa. There were so many reasons for this album to fall short. After all, the songs that had made Poly-Rythmo popular in the western world were not only recorded over 30 years ago but they were also not the songs that made them popular in Benin and other West African countries. Additionally the personnel of the band had changed greatly from this time and they were bringing back a singer with whom they had parted ways over 30 years ago. It's seems unlikely that they were playing these songs five years ago, except maybe for the latin-influenced numbers.
For me, the moment of truth in this album comes during the first song, "Ne Te Fache Pas," when the guitarist launches into Papillon's guitar solo. While the cry of "Paillon" is sorely missed, the solo is expertly handled with flair. And if it bothers you that this version is almost half the time as the one on Kings of Benin Urban Groove 1972-80, just remember that on that version they just play the song twice. The new version of "Gbeti Madjro" is spiced up nicely with vocals by Angelique Kidjo. And the oft-mentioned collaboration with Franz Ferdinand, "Lion is Burning," which starts with a relatively lame disco riff is, after about a minute, nicely funked up by Poly-Rythmo. I miss having longer songs. Ironically though, the one I wish was longer is "Lion is Burning", which ends ways too soon after a great percussion break. They should have played it twice.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By stutron on March 25, 2012
Format: Audio CD
Grabbed this album after it made the NY Times Top 10 Albums of 2011 and was not disappointed. This band apparently was reunited after nearly twenty years thanks to the strong urging of a fan. You would never guess they haven't played together in that long - this is a tight, tight band, their horns just deliver a knockout punch. If you're not hooked by the first song and uncontrollably dancing, please seek medical attention immediately. Crisp guitar riffs, driving bass and rhythms that move your body like a puppet, this is just a fun, solid afrobeat album.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Zy on August 20, 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Guitar focused folky grooves from around the globe with an emphasis on the African rock styling. Strut records release. Pretty good.
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