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Counter Revolution of Science Paperback – June 1, 1980


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 415 pages
  • Publisher: Liberty Fund Inc. (June 1, 1980)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0913966673
  • ISBN-13: 978-0913966679
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.4 x 8.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #876,808 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Friedrich August Hayek (1899-1992), recipient of the Medal of Freedom in 1991 and co-winner of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1974, was a pioneer in monetary theory and the principal proponent of libertarianism in the twentieth century. He taught at the University of London, the University of Chicago, and the University of Freiburg. His influence on the economic policies in capitalist countries has been profound, especially during the Reagan administration in the U.S. and the Thatcher government in the U.K.

Customer Reviews

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Man must have complete power to refashion everything in any way he desires.
Luc REYNAERT
Generally speaking, Hayek makes the importance of recognizing and respecting the limits of human reason abundantly clear.
D. W. MacKenzie
Friedrich August von Hayek (1899-1992) was a great Austrian-born economist and philosopher.
Gary Wolf

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

53 of 55 people found the following review helpful By D. W. MacKenzie on January 17, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The Counter Revolution of Science is an important book for several reasons. First, The CRS explains the futility of schemes to plan progress, the impossibility of efforts for the "human mind to lift itself up by its own bootstraps". What this means is that "the attempt of conscious reason to control its own development limits the very growth to what the human mind can could foresee". Freedom "releases the knowledge and energies of countless individuals that could never be utilized in a society consciously directed from the top". Second, the CRS explains how the mindset of the physical sciences, which focuses on objective factors, fails when applied to economics. Understanding economics requires an appreciation of subjectivity in human relations. Engineers pursue technical excellence according to objective scientific principles, without considering economic factors (i.e. scarcity), and worse still the application of mathematical methods from the social sciences creates a false and dangerous impression that society can itself be engineered. Third, Hayek examines the history of the development of `scientistic' ideas, whereby various thinkers (especially St Simon and Comte) popularized positivism, socialism, and corporatism. Finally, reading the CRS instills an appreciation of the humility of individualism and disdain for the hubris of collectivism in the reader.

Generally speaking, Hayek makes the importance of recognizing and respecting the limits of human reason abundantly clear. Hayek saw that modern collectivism was working to undo the intellectual progress made during the Age of Reason and the Enlightenment. Collectivism was antithetical to reason, and would lead us to a new Dark Age if not reversed.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Kevin S. Currie on November 26, 2001
Format: Paperback
Too often, Hayek is not given enough credit. Too many people see him as merely a critic of socialism and defender of libertarianism (not that there's anything wrong with that). But Hayek was a brilliant social philosopher too and this book is Hayek at his best.
Unfortunately, this book begs to be misunderstood. I fear that people will read the second section before the first (if they read the first at all), and frankly, I could've done without the second.
At base, this book is not a critique on planning. It is a philosophical explanation of how we gain and use knowledge in the natural and social sciences. After Hayek lays out what he feels are mistakes in the methods of social science (psychologism, holism, scientism), he examines the mistakes thinkers have made that brought them to these -isms. Then and only then does he offer a critique of planning but ONE WILL NOT UNDERSTAND IN FULL THE SECOND SECTION WITHOUT HAVEING READ AND ABSORBED THE IDEAS IN THE FIRST! One may even want to read Popper's 'The Poverty of Historicism' before or with this book.
In closing, if you're looking for a critique on planning and socialism, read 'The Road To Serfdom' or 'Individualism and Economic Order', but if you want a great critique of science (social as well as natural) and it's current methods, read this one WITH CARE!
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 4, 1998
Format: Paperback
In this dense book Hayek probes the origins of socialist thought. His account of the attempt to make history a mathematical science and the differences between subjective and objective thought is some of the most interesting and thought provoking discussion written this century.
It is a hard read but well worth the effort.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Brown on January 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
Hayek was probably the greatest thinker of the 20th Century. He certainly out ranked the counterparts of his day - think about his debates with Keynes or his discussions of the conceits of socialism. Hayek had the integrity to thik carefully about a number of issues.
After WWII he began to think about a set of issues that would not be considered economics - but then Hayek was never bothered by the narrow comparmentalization that some academics operate in. His address to the London Economic Club and his discussions on Economics and Knowledge (knowledge of time and place) are legendary.
This book is a caution to social scientists. In the early fifties, Hayek cautioned his colleagues who were fast rushing to adopt "scientific" approaches to their disciplines - to move into that arena with caution. Numbers tend to become real on their own and are not always helpful in explaining issues or in helping to clarify thinking. His arguments, like the rest of his writing, are clear and well done. The book is a bit dense for some who have not the depth of his references - but it is well worth the effort.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Gary Wolf on February 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Friedrich August von Hayek (1899-1992) was a great Austrian-born economist and philosopher. When one considers the breadth of his work and the acuity of his analysis, he may very well be the pre-eminent sociopolitical thinker of the 20th century.

No one has been such an outspoken advocate for liberty, or such a devastating foe of all forms of socialism--what Hayek often calls "collectivism." In The Counter-Revolution of Science (1952), he deconstructs the illusions of the early socialist thinkers, notably the false doctrine of "scientism," the misapplication of scientific methodology to social phenomena, particularly history.

History, Hayek explains, is not a real thing, subject to the methods of the natural sciences. If we are to undertake a study of zebras, we need not hesitate to employ these methods. We see before us a type of animal that is clearly distinguished from other species. There can be little doubt that a zebra is a zebra. Our subjects behave in accordance with the characteristics of their kind. They cannot change themselves, and there is no emotional or intellectual bond between researcher and subject.

All this is completely different when it comes to human history. Our subjects do not behave in a predictable fashion, and they can remake themselves. There are many bonds (and enmity) between researcher and subject. But most importantly, the creation of history is itself a subjective act. The actors are implementing what they believe to be "their" history of the moment; moreover, each individual has a different perception of his own behavior, his neighbor's behavior, and indeed everything else occurring in the world. To say that this phenomenon is subject to laws in the same sense as natural laws is a serious error.
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