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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Scary what people will believe. . .
The Bible says that "in the latter times, some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils," and that people will "not endure sound doctrine, but shall heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears."
This is exactly what Hanegraaf is exposing in "Counterfeit Revival." What I love about his books is that he uses the frauds...
Published on November 29, 2002 by Michael Freeman

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67 of 90 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Relies on old data and false impressions
Hank Hanegraaff's long-awaited book against what he perceives as a counterfeit revival (rooted in Satan the "master counterfeiter" who "masquerades as an angel of enlightenment") represents a significant moment in Christian publishing. Its significance lies in three things. First, the spectacular selling run of Hanegraaff's work alone makes it a...
Published on September 29, 1999


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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Scary what people will believe. . ., November 29, 2002
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This review is from: Counterfeit Revival (Paperback)
The Bible says that "in the latter times, some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils," and that people will "not endure sound doctrine, but shall heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears."
This is exactly what Hanegraaf is exposing in "Counterfeit Revival." What I love about his books is that he uses the frauds own words to expose their heresy. He quotes from the leadership of the modern "charasmatic" movement and shows that it indeed is "counterfeit."
The book discusses such alleged manifestations of the Holy Spirit such as tongues, being slain by the spirit, spasmodic jerking/twitching, barking like dogs, and other absurdities.
It opened my eyes to some of the trash that is being promoted out there as Christianity. Oftentimes Bible-believing Christians avoid that stuff so well, that they have no idea how widespread, and how widely-accepted, the error really is.
I think every Christian should read this book, and then search the Scriptures so he himself knows WHY Hanegraaf is right. If true Christians would only study and know the Word as God intends, much of the garbage that goes on would never spread.
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63 of 76 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Must Read For Those Who Hunger For Revival, August 20, 2001
This review is from: Counterfeit Revival (Paperback)
I have attended Brownsville Assembly of God on two different occasions. Both times I walked away with a hunger for God. I did not shake. I did not fall down. I simply walked away with a hunger for God's presence in my home church. I walked away longing for people to be sovereignly saved. I walked away challanged to be holy as God is holy (1 Peter 1:15-16).
I bought this book before I went to Brownsville. I knew that Hanegraaff was having some problems with the so called "revival movements." I too was having those problems.
What did I learn? This book will call you to study the Word of God. Revival must be based on the clear teachings of Scripture. I fully stand with Hanegraaff on this issue. Nevertheless, I did not like the "spirit" which seems to be in this book (as opposed to Christianity In Crisis). While I felt that there was (and still is) a great need for men like Hank to call the Body of Christ back to the Bible but we must do this in a spirit of humility (2 Timothy 2:24-25).
I would encourage you to read this book but continue to pray for revival. Don't be discouraged. Seek Jesus with all your heart and fall in love with Him and His awesome truth.
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55 of 71 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to NOT Get the Holy Spirit! But Too Much In-fighting, August 18, 2003
This review is from: Counterfeit Revival (Paperback)
This book is a real page turner. It reads like a juicy expose' story that shows how certain small, infamous religious organizations are teaching and preaching a phoney doctrine of getting the Holy Spirit via thrilling sensations and unprovable "miracles" or hypnotic suggestion. This book cannot cover every phoney ministry in the country, but it gets the point across by going very in-depth with a few of the worst cases, both recently and since the inception of the New World, America.
I learned a lot about what SEEMS to be very impressive events occurring at fake worship sessions, and how it is mostly, or entirely, a show biz type trick, with techniques that have been in use for at least over 200 years. I was also surprised that I got a good overview and fresh exposure to many classic Christian writers and thinkers, such as Jonathan Edwards.
To me, the main proof that "Counterfeit Revival"'s described events are NOT the work of the Holy Spirit is that there is no evidence of these "newly converted" becoming Christians with hearts for Christian Service and doing good works. Instead, this book shows that the counterfeit converts seem to only become junkies for more and more thrills and chills at endless counterfeit worship services. It becomes a self-serving religiousity. Real Christians get the Holy Spirit and go out and do good works. These counterfeit Christians keep going back for more fun and entertainment for themselves.
The only down-side to this book is that the author seems to be in long-running relationships and arguments with many of the contemporary characters discussed in the book, while the Bible says we should avoid getting in endless arguments because it can cause confusion among people that don't understand Scripture very well, (2 Timothy 2:23-24, perhaps applies well here).
This book shows what to NOT get involved with, in your personal search for better understanding of the Holy Spirit, and in your Christian walk. But this book doesn't really tell you HOW TO get in touch with the Holy Spirit, though it does use tons of Biblical chapter:verse to discredit the counterfeit techniques.
If you're looking for good direction about HOW TO get a better understanding and relationship with the REAL Holy Spirit, then I would heartily recommend a book titled, "The Fire That Ignites" by Tony Evans.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece of courage and conviction, January 11, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Counterfeit Revival (Paperback)
Counterfeit Revival is a well-researched, accessible book that exposes the foundations of today's charismatic movement, traces religious "enthusiasm" through history (at least back as far as the Quakers, although other works take the lineage further back to groups like the Cathars and the Montanists), and notes how the modern charismatic movement deviates from historic Christianity. Critics may label the tone of the book "negative," but I spent a year traveling around Pentecostal churches (including those in the Assemblies of God, the largest, most "mainstream" Pentecostal/Charismatic denomination), and I can vouch for the impeccable accuracy of this book.
The author, who is himself a moderate Charismatic, believes the excesses of the modern charismatic movement threaten the fabric of Christianity. I agree. If the Charismatic movement becomes identical with "evangelicalism," then in the 25 years, evangelicalism will not exist.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent, June 8, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Counterfeit Revival (Hardcover)
I want to add that this excellent book does not cover it all, I mean there are more general books such as Edgar's Satisfied by the Spirit, George Birch's Delivrance Ministry, McArthur's Charismatic Chaos, etc. These are good complements to Hanegraaff's excellent book.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The True Revival, July 10, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Counterfeit Revival (Paperback)
This is a wonderful book that should be read by every believer who is considering whether or not these "annointed" men are true teachers (Benny Hinn, Kenneth Copeland, etc...). You can accuse Hank all you want of trying to put a negative spin on these men, but their own words condemn them, not Hanks. I don't know who listens to the Bible Answer Man show, but anyone who says that Hank is Anti-Charismatic or Anti-Penticostal, is obviously either not listening to the show or wanting to believe something on the basis of there own pride. Time and time again, Hank has gone out of his way to state and show he is not any of these things, and that He finds no evidence to suggest that the spiritual gifts (toungues, interpretation of toungues, prophecy, etc.) ceased with the closing of the canon. So to all those that say he is anti-pentecostal, or anti-charismatic, you really should listen before you speak.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Review on Counterfeits, *****Five Stars, April 6, 2000
I feel that there is a lot of dissent in the Charismatic movement. "If you don't have the gift of tongues, either you are not a true Christian, or you are a Christian who will never reach their full potential in a relationship with Jesus." I struggled in my relationship with the Lord because the Charismatic movement was telling me that I didn't have faith in the Lord. I read Hinn, Copeland, etc. and gave them a chance and became dissillusioned and confused. I left to go to a evangelistic church to find that Jesus was willing to meet me right where I was at. My relationship with the Lord has become stronger and I am continuing to grow. Hank's book did not "bash" these counterfeits, the counterfeits bashed themselves through contradictions. The Lord is not a Lord of confusion. The counterfeits here remind me of the people who came two centuries ago in horse-drawn wagons to sell their "snake oil". The counterfeits put the glory on themselves, not the Lord. They claim that the Lord has anointed them, but I see no evidence of that through their ministries. Where does Kirkpatrick get off stating that the Lord was to strike Hank dead after being exposed as a counterfeit? Hank confirmed that my discernment was not wrong. I am really thankful that the Lord has used his servant Hank Hanegraaff to expose these counterfeits. The counterfeits work a lot on feelings, not the Word of God. The counterfeits manipulate the word to work for their own causes or to make them equivilent to Jesus in other people's eyes. It is really sad. I appreciate this book and will share it with friends who have been scarred through this counterfeit movement. Keep up the good work, Hank, we will continue to pray that the Lord continues to give all of us wisdom.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I respect Hank Hanegraaff for writing this book., September 4, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Counterfeit Revival (Hardcover)
His book helps people to be aware that the Bible is the true inspired Word of God. These counterfeit revivalists are steering away from the Bible, which warns us against false teachers and prophets who will enter into the church and deceive many. I think people need to be aware that Satan and his demons are very active. Satan does diguise himself as an "angel of light" and will deceive those who allow it. I hope that this book will help people to be aware, and to "test the spirits" as it says in the Bible.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars EXCELLENT FOLLOW-UP TO "CHRISTIANITY IN CRISIS", June 18, 1998
By A Customer
HANK HAS DONE A FANTASTIC JOB OF EXPOSING THE "WORD OF FAITH" MOVEMENT. THIS BOOK GOES INTO GREATER DEPTH ABOUT WHAT YOU SEE ON TV. IT ALSO GIVES DETAILS ABOUT THE CURRENT WAVE OF "HOLY LAUGHTER" THAT IS BEING TOUTED BY THESE TEACHERS. JUST AS IN "CHRISTIANITY IN CRISIS", HANK WARNS US ABOUT THE PIT-FALLS AND FALSEHOODS BEING TAUGHT "IN THE NAME OF JESUS". HIS PRESENTATION IS CLEAR AND THE INFORMATION WELL RESEARCHED. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS BOOK TO ALL!!! THANKS!! END
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67 of 90 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Relies on old data and false impressions, September 29, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Counterfeit Revival (Paperback)
Hank Hanegraaff's long-awaited book against what he perceives as a counterfeit revival (rooted in Satan the "master counterfeiter" who "masquerades as an angel of enlightenment") represents a significant moment in Christian publishing. Its significance lies in three things. First, the spectacular selling run of Hanegraaff's work alone makes it a must-read for those who want to track trends in the Christian community.
Second, Counterfeit Revival exposes some real excesses and imbalances in the current charismatic renewal movements. Hanegraaff rightly criticizes the undue emphasis on strange manifestations in the world of modern revivalism. This misplaced focus is especially disturbing given the regular diet of anti-intellectual rhetoric, slim biblical exposition, and revelatory claims on which many who participate in these movements are nurtured. Hanegraaff also documents some very intemperate judgments made against him by South African evangelist Rodney Howard-Browne at a renewal meeting in Anaheim and warns against sectarian judgments and spiritual death threats from prophets and leaders connected with the Toronto renewal, ones that should be publicly and finally repudiated by Toronto Blessing leader John Arnott.
But Hanegraaff's work is also important for a third and tragic reason. In the end, it is a misleading, simplistic, and harmful book, marred by faulty logic, outdated and limited research, and nasty misrepresentation of key charismatic leaders. Unlike many, I do not question Hanegraaff's motives, but his zeal has blinded him from taking the path of principled Christian discourse.
Counterfeit Revival is an indictment composed of hundreds of specific assertions about individuals and groups. These claims cannot be accepted or rejected in toto; each must be weighed on its merits. In the scope of this review, it is possible only to give representative examples of Hanegraaff's failure to take account of evidence that contradicts his sweeping claims.
Consider, for example, Hanegraaff's assertion that Howard-Browne denies the deity of Christ in order to elevate himself: a damning charge indeed, if true. But in a 1995 published interview with me, the South African evangelist explained his one controversial statement on the topic and clearly affirmed orthodox doctrine.
Similarly, Todd Hunter, the national coordinator of the Vineyard, is targeted for a four-sentence statement he made in a 1994 sermon about three controversial Pentecostal healers. This becomes the centerpiece for an entire chapter in which Hanegraaff trashes Hunter by linking him with the worst excesses of these healers. Hunter phoned and wrote Hanegraaff just as the book was going to press to say that he deplored the very sins and falsehoods catalogued in Counterfeit Revival and explicitly denied Hanegraaff's interpretation of his statement. Despite that clarification, Hanegraaff did not modify his attack on Hunter in subsequent printings.
In chapter 14, John Wimber is targeted for prophetic views that he has not held since 1991, ones that he has publicly acknowledged as the biggest mistake of his ministry, while his crucial decision to disaffiliate the Toronto Airport Vineyard from the Association of Vineyard Churches is relegated to an endnote. Hanegraaff has 46 references to Wimber's tapes and writings, but there is only one reference from the last six years! Fully half of all the references concern Hanegraaff's critique of a 1981 tape series expressing views that Wimber no longer holds.
Counterfeit Revival also attacks Wimber for his association with Lonnie Frisbee, a former Jesus People evangelist. Hanegraaff refers to a 1979 service where Wimber "turned his church into a laboratory and his church members into guinea pigs. Tragically, the 'lab technician' who experimented on them that night was a hypnotist struggling with homosexuality. In 1995 he died of AIDS."
The evening service in question was on Mother's Day in 1980, not in 1979. Frisbee died in 1993, not 1995. Frisbee dabbled in hypnotism when he was a hippie but totally repudiated it after his conversion. What Hanegraaff neglects to mention is that Frisbee, in spite of homosexual tendencies, was a formative influence on Chuck Smith, Greg Laurie, and other Calvary Chapel pastors besides Wimber. At Frisbee's funeral, held at the Crystal Cathedral, Chuck Smith referred to him as one like Samson. That image is a lot more gracious and redemptive than the one used to malign John Wimber.
Hanegraaff demonizes Wimber and Hunter by using their words to paint them as Quaker-like subjectivists who value the inner light over Scripture, a stance that Jonathan Edwards calls the view of Satan himself. Hanegraaff shows bad faith in reading their comments in the worst light, failing to cite their clear and repeated declarations of biblical authority and inerrancy, and refusing to alter his text in response to Hunter's letter of clarification.
Of course, Hanegraaff's whole argument topples if Counterfeit Revival readers find out that Wimber, Hunter, Arnott, Clark, Howard-Browne, and company all believe, despite their errors and excesses, in the authority of Scripture and in the essentials of the gospel. That Hanegraaff has chosen to ignore every bit of evidence that these men have been used by God to bring sinners to Calvary and weary believers to refreshment is very distressing.
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Counterfeit Revival
Counterfeit Revival by Hank Hanegraaff (Paperback - July 30, 2001)
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