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A Country I Do Not Recognize Hardcover – January 1, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0817946012 ISBN-10: 0817946012 Edition: 0th

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Hoover Institution Press (January 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0817946012
  • ISBN-13: 978-0817946012
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #696,735 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert H. Bork served as solicitor general, acting attorney general of the United States, and a United States Court of Appeals judge. He was also a distinguished fellow at the Hudson Institute and the Tad and Dianne Taube Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He was a partner in a major law firm and taught constitutional law at Yale Law School, and is the author of the best-selling The Tempting of America: The Political Seduction of the Law. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful By R. Setliff on January 11, 2006
Format: Paperback
~A Country I Do Not Recognize: The Legal Assault on American Values~ is a trenchant critique of a legal culture gone awry. Nine learned jurists including Lino Graglia, Gary McDowell, Terry Eastland, David Davenport, Lee Casey, and David Rivkin Jr. have taken to the task of surmising the legal assault on tradition and our basic American values. Likewise, this scholarly work addresses the internationalization of law, and the threat posed to American national sovereignty by the New Diplomacy and nebulous notions of universal jurisdiction. Former Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork writes the introduction to this erudite anthology of prescient cultural criticism on a legal system run amok. The Constitution, the objective moral norms of civil society, and the rule of law have been subverted.

For the past half-century, activists have aggressively used the court system and to a lesser degree the emerging world government to achieve considerable social, cultural and political change. They have been largely successful and have achieved public policy goals that would not likely be possible through legislative processes. We the American people, now have constitutional law without the Constitution, and are subjected to barrage of policies advanced by judicial fiat.

First Amendment jurisprudence in the last century alone has placed innumerable impediments upon any efforts to regulate obscenity, protect national security or ensure public safety. The Court has remade libel law virtually eliminating any sense of fair play in allowing one to protect their reputation. At the height of the Cold War, the High Court ruled against the exclusion of Communist Party members from sensitive jobs in defense plants.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Chad on November 28, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I must confess that I purchased the book without realizing that it was merely edited by Robert Bork. The book does have a lengthy introduction from Bork that is compelling as always. But the book is a collection of articles written by various legal scholars. I didn't mind this since their works were all well written and were thoughtfully delivered.

This book is a refreshing look at how different aspects of the legal system have been taken over by the left. Refreshing, because it provides a scholarly analysis -- as opposed to a Bill O'Reily type analysis -- of the legal system and its flaws. It provides a sobering view of the consequences of the deterioration of the legal principles upon which this country was founded.

That said, this book is as lengthy as a volume from a law review. I don't mind the format too much, but since they are charging me for a book, I expect more than a couple hundred pages. For this I subtract a star. Also, much of the material is a retread of themes that have been touched upon elsewhere. With the glut of legal writing extant, a book should have something new to add.

Notwithstanding this criticism, Lino Graglia's article is indeed fresh and new (at least to my eyes). He advocates the repeal of judicial review with remarkable cogency.

Overall, it's a good book, though slightly overpriced.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Gary Wolf on January 5, 2009
Format: Paperback
Of all the manifold aspects of cultural decay, one of the most difficult to recognize is the corruption of constitutional law. When one thinks of the Supreme Court, or even of the judiciary overall, the image that comes to mind is a procession of old, graying men in black robes, blowing their noses into crusty handkerchiefs as they read dusty legal tomes. They sit on their lofty benches, refusing to budge from ancient precedent and the letter of the law. Humorless curmudgeons, they are capable of mercy only if the accused implores them, crying his eyes out in the process.

Of course, nothing could be further from the truth. The persistence of this myth is one of the reasons why so much of the population is unaware that the Supreme Court has systematically raped the Anglo-American legal tradition as expressed in the Constitution. The Court, along with its enablers in the government, the media, and the law schools, has helped pave the way for the politically-correct, socialist nightmare that is now staring us in the face.

If anyone understands this phenomenon down to its minutest details, it is Robert Bork, one of the world's most eminent and erudite legal scholars. In 2005, Bork assembled half a dozen articles on the subject from various authors (including himself) and published them in "A Country I Do Not Recognize: The Legal Assault on American Values." The title of the book is taken from a dissenting opinion written by Justice Antonin Scalia in 1996:

"What secret knowledge, one must wonder, is breathed into lawyers when they become Justices of this Court, that enables them to discern that a practice which the text of the Constitution does not clearly proscribe, and which our people have regarded as constitutional for 200 years, is in fact unconstitutional?...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Stanley H. Becker on August 28, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Another fine book with Robert Bork's name (as editor) attached and as writer of the direction-setting introduction. The book is an excellent follow-on to Bork's earlier The Tempting of America. (And no one should overlook Slouching Toward Gomorrah either.)
Each selected author explicates and illustrates the various ways our judicial system, and the Supreme Court in particular, have drifted away from the basic intent of the U.S. Constitution, away from what Judge Bork calls "original understanding." The need is great to implement some way to bring checks and balances to this unelected, politically-appointed board of lawyers. Some possible ways are suggested within the covers of this valuable and very readable volume.
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