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Cracking the GRE Literature Test, 4th Edition (Graduate Test Prep) Paperback – September 17, 2002

ISBN-13: 978-0375762680 ISBN-10: 037576268X Edition: 4th

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Product Details

  • Series: Graduate Test Prep (Book 4)
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton Review; 4th edition (September 17, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 037576268X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375762680
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,378,651 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

The Princeton Review realizes that acing the GRE Literature Test is very different from getting straight A's in school. We don't try to teach you everything there is to know about literature–only the techniques you'll need to score higher on the test. There's a big difference. In Cracking the GRE Literature Test, we'll teach you how to think like the test writers and

·Eliminate answer choices that look right but are planted to fool you
·Raise your score by focusing on the material most likely to appear on the test
·Study our brief summaries of major literary works and figures
·Review our introduction to literary terms, verse forms, and schools of criticism

This book includes one full-length, practice GRE Literature Test. All of our practice questions are like the ones you'll see on the actual GRE Literature Test, and we fully explain every solution.

About the Author

The Princeton Review is the fastest growing test-preparation company in the country, with over 60 franchise offices in the nation. Each year, we help more than 2 million students prepare for college, grad school, professional licensing exams, and successful careers.

Customer Reviews

I found this book very helpful in my preparation for the GRE Literature Subject Test.
Aiden James K.
Maybe it will help you get into the 600s, but it seems to me that's as far as you could possibly go without spending serious time with the Nortons.
SaucyCat
The real tests do indeed have identification questions, and alot of them, but nowhere near to the extent that this book would have you believe.
Ookie Cookie

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Karl Kukta on November 13, 2002
Contrary to the previous two reviewers, I did find that using the Princeton Study guide helped me in my preparation for and approach to the GRE Subject test. It is true that many of the emphasized texts did not appear on the version I took (no "Ulysses" or "Second Coming", "Elegy in a Country Churchyard" or Herrick's Julia poems), but quite a few were there, and the clues this book offered to spot such works (e.g. Pepys' diary, the distinctions between J.S. Mill and Cardinal Newman) helped me rack up more points than I otherwise would have.
I will not argue with the others on the issue of modern lit: the book is much too light on 20th century stuff, which did appear substantially on my test. Princeton Review NEEDS to update this aspect of their book; however, I was prepared for such questions based on my reviewing of Norton Anthologies, a suggestion that this book stresses highly. No 20th century author who appeared on the test is absent from the Nortons.
I dont know about anyone else, but the fact that the sample test in this book was more difficult than the actual test made me feel better about my performance last week. Also, my test featured a comparable amount of questions matching authors to novels and short passages to titles.
I still think that a test-taker who does not utilize this book will be at a serious disadvantage when test-day comes; in addition to purchasing this book, I also recommend using Edith Hamilton's "Mythology" to solidify your knowledge of Greek/Roman stories (it helped me to retain the names of characters, which I often have a problem with when reading plot summaries), and, if your library has it, the Martin S. Day series on the history of English Literature, in three volumes.
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39 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Ookie Cookie on November 4, 2002
This is the only gre literature review book I have used, based on the recommendations of other readers. If this is the best out there, the others must be atrocious.
It does have its good points- the way it breaks down the ideology behind the test is helpful, and the "this is how things really are" tone of the book, while not totally accurate, is comforting. And it's nice to have another practice test, albeit an imperfect one.
But there are major problems. The lists of texts are questionable- I have yet to see any of Herrick's Julia poems in any of the actual ETS tests I've taken, and here they're given primary importance. Secondly, and most problematic, the lists ignore the 20th century completely, with the cop-out excuse that college curriculae dealing with modernism are not yet highly defined. This may be fine and true, but don't be fooled: you'll see a LOT of 20th century authors on the test, and several will certainly appear more than once. Not including information on these authors (except for in the garbled answer explanations- see below) is inexcusable.
The book attempts to make up for this lack by providing explanations of all the questions and possible answers in their practice test. This is certainly helpful and welcome, but there are several major problems with this test. First of all it is much harder than the actual tests are. The Princeton Review authors are working under the assumption that the test deals primarily with identification of names (authors, characters, works, etc), and thus they construct a test that supports their hypothesis. The real tests do indeed have identification questions, and alot of them, but nowhere near to the extent that this book would have you believe.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By SaucyCat on December 12, 2003
Why waste your time with this secondhand method of test prep when what you need is in the splendid Norton Anthologies? Testimonial: I am a grad school applicant to programs in English literature who took no English literature courses as an undergrad (I satisfied lit req's by taking courses in lit in translation). By reading the Nortons for a few hours a night for several weeks - concentrating my efforts on the major authors - I was able to get a very good score on the GRE Lit exam. To do well on the exam you need to have spent time reading the authors; I can't imagine Princeton Review's tricks for spotting distinctive styles being sufficient. If you're like I was - in the 600s, trying to get up into the 700s - this book will not be helpful. Maybe it will help you get into the 600s, but it seems to me that's as far as you could possibly go without spending serious time with the Nortons.
None of the explanatory material in the Princeton Review book is better than that found in the Nortons. It is neither more thorough nor more enjoyable (the Nortons' pithy bios are delightful). Even if you're so short on time that you'd still consider purchacing this book as an expedient study aid, don't bother: your time would be better spent with the notes in the Nortons. Better to invest your time and money in the worlds of Milton, Chaucer and others so nicely introduced in those volumes.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 13, 2003
Unfortunately, this is the only study guide for the GRE Literature Test that I know of (the other is just a collection of practice tests). While I felt it helped me prepare for the GRE, I think it needs updated, especially the literary theory. There were numerous questions about literary critics and their books not mentioned even in passing in this book. Many of the older writers are barely on the test, like Chaucer. Urging students to review their Norton is a helpful suggestion and the practice test along with the one supplied by the GRE is also some help in getting ready. Hopefully this book will be updated soon or the test will be discontinued, good luck!!
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