Crash 2005 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

Available in HD
(1,488) IMDb 7.9/10
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Winner of 3 Academy Awards including BEST PICTURE, CRASH takes place in the diverse metropolis of Los Angeles and challenges audiences to confront their prejudices. Lives combust when a Brentwood housewife and her district attorney husband, a Persian shopkeeper, two cops, a pair of carjackers and a Korean couple all converge.

Starring:
Karina Arroyave, Dato Bakhtadze
Runtime:
1 hour, 53 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Paul Haggis
Starring Karina Arroyave, Dato Bakhtadze
Supporting actors Sandra Bullock, Don Cheadle, Art Chudabala, Sean Cory, Tony Danza, Keith David, Loretta Devine, Matt Dillon, Jennifer Esposito, Ime Etuk, Eddie J. Fernandez, William Fichtner, Howard Fong, Brendan Fraser, Billy Gallo, Ken Garito, Nona Gaye, Octavio Gómez Berríos
Studio Lionsgate
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

85 of 103 people found the following review helpful By Emily R. Jarrell on September 7, 2005
Format: DVD
This is the truest movie out there on racism, and the preconceived notions we ALL (no matter what color) try not to admit to to a certain extent. This was not a "lets bash the white man" movie either, the racism was across the board. The biggest surprise was to come about an hour in, and I was stunned to see the revelation of that storyline (with Matt Dillon). This film requires paying attention to, please stay with it, it will pay off. High recommend!
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44 of 57 people found the following review helpful By D. Mills on August 14, 2006
Format: DVD
I passed up this film when first released on DVD but by hook or by crook, not to mention a nod from the Academy, I decided to give it a look. I was an entertaining two hours, but the in-your-face treatment of racial tension (is that ALL they talk about?), followed by self-congratulatory featurettes in which the film's creators convince us they are doing us great social service by making folks of every persuation confront their prejudice, reek of naivete and opportunism. (The 'Introduction to Crash by Director Paul Haggis' feature warranted its own icon, but consisted only of Haggis grinning in a self-satisfied manner and informing us that he was director Paul Haggis and here was HIS film, Crash). Am I supposed to take a deep breath? Make the popcorn? Take a potty break?

The film looks fine, sounds fine and is well-acted, and other reviews here will outline the who-and-what, so I'll merely leave you with a parting thought. A few years ago, a black man named Rodney King was severely beaten by LA cops. The incident was caught on camera and the police were initially acquitted by a largely white jury. This resulted in rioting in African-American neighborhoods, which cost one caucasian truck driver his life (wrong place, wrong time)and ruined many a business in the area (many owned by Koreans and Asians). If that true-life sequence of events didn't lead to revolutionary changes in people's attitudes (on all sides), an over-rated, but watchable, feature film will not begin to scratch the surface, despite its makers' smug post-Oscar posturing.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Dean Backus on March 30, 2006
Format: DVD
A great cast and good intentions make most of this film go down easily--too easily. Don Cheadle, Sandra Bullock, Matt Dillon, Thandie Newton and Terrence Howard do sterling work in this tale of culture clashes, prejudices, and coincidences in Los Angeles, and scene by scene the film is gripping with some amazingly powerful and poignant moments. However, the script's desire to throw stereotypes up on the screen, while brave, is also its weakness: too many of the overwhelmingly large number of speaking parts are, in fact, stereotypes, and no amount of happy wish-fulfillment or well-intentioned scenes that come across as patronizing (an injured Bullock embracing her Latina housekeeper and telling her she's her best friend) can paper over the fault lines the film purports to examine. Cheadle, as he was in "Hotel Rwanda," is the throughline of the movie, and his knockout final scene with his mother has a dramatic punch and ambiguity that the rest of the movie needs; too often, it feels like something that would've been incendiary in the mid-90's after Rodney King and O.J. (especially if Spike Lee had tackled it), but now seems simultaneously overwrought and tame. You'll admire the performances (a deserving SAG win), but the more you think about the movie as a whole, the more it seems too tidy--and putting it up against the brainy "Good Night and Good Luck" and the shattering "Brokeback Mountain," it's flaws are even more apparent, especially the awful video quality. It's a water-cooler "buzz" film right now (thanks to the Oscar idiocy), but how it will stand up over time is a very big question mark--it was #36 in Entertainment Weekly's year-end critic's roundup, and #56 in PREMIERE'S. ("Brokeback" and "Good Night" were #2 and #3, respectively.) Good for high school civics classes if they can get past the (voluminous) profanity, and for those more interested in praising the film's reach over its actual grasp.
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23 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Movie Watcher on March 9, 2006
Format: DVD
I love, love, love the Oscars. This year, when I read that Crash was nominated, I laughed to myself and figured the Academy just needed to fill one more spot to make five...WOW, and then it WON. It actually WON. I will admit I have not seen Brokeback Mountain yet, but I also know that given the publicity and accolades Brokeback has received, it seemed almost indefinite that it would win. Crash is a Lifetime movie at best.

Crash mangaged to have an agenda, stick to the agenda, and basically scream, "Here is our agenda...racism is bad!" for the entire film. Some of the more "serious" racism scenes were so over-the-top and unrealistic that I laughed more than I thought, "What a deep, moving film this is..." Actually, I don't think I thought "deeply" at all during this crap, nor do I find it moving or profound.

How did Matt Dillon get nominated from an ensemble cast where no one in particular shined? This film could have been done with a dozen nobodies and it would still be the same.

I think the Academy, unfortunately, isn't ready to give an Oscar to a film like Brokeback, but they want to look socially aware, so Crash was a safe choice. It's a wonder this film was nominated to begin with.
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28 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Mike on March 7, 2006
Format: DVD
THE GOOD:

The acting were great especially Terrence Howard and Thandie Newton. Terrence Howard should have been nominated for Best Supporting Actor instead of Matt Dillon.

THE BAD:

I'm a visible minority (non-white) and I have experienced some form of racism in my life. BUT despite my life experiences and the movie's subject matter, I would definitely NOT say that this movie is the best of the year, in fact, it's FAR from it. I have problems with this movie both from a moviegoer's perspective and from a visible minority's perspective. Some of my problems with this movie are:

(1) Poor character development (or none at all). Just because we saw extremes in a character, for example, Matt Dillon being a racist cop and being a good caregiver to his ailing father, that does not mean in any way that the character is well-developed. Yes, I admit that in a big cast ensemble like in this movie, it is quite difficult for every character to be well-developed, BUT that does not mean that at none of the characters should be like that.

(2) The dialogue seems really contrived to the point that I'm really surprised this movie won for Best Original Screenplay. They should show this movie in a screenplay writing class NOT because it's good but to show students and future screenplay writers what NOT to do. I just felt like I've been hit by the head over and over again how bad racism is. I get it.

(3) The plot seems so coincidental, it is laugable.
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