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Crazy Bosses: Fully Revised and Updated Hardcover – May 8, 2007


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: HarperBusiness (May 8, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060731575
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060731571
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 7.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #669,107 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Bing, who writes Esquire magazine's "Executive Summary" column, analyzes a slice of corporate culture gone mad--the interpersonal dynamics of working with a crazy boss. He first describes the process of a typical initiate entering the corporate world with a general set of perceptions which may be out of sync with the underlying mechanisms that govern the behavior of corporate players. Through the use of anecdotes generalized to portray recurring themes, Bing describes the various kinds of crazy bosses: the boss with the five brains, the bully, the paranoid boss, the narcissist, the "bureaucrazy," and the disaster hunter. Chapter subheadings range from clever to cutesy, making it difficult to refer back to particular sections of his discussion. However, Bing ends each chapter with concrete strategies to cope with each type of crazy boss. Recommended for general business collections.
- Todd Yaeger, West Virginia Univ. Lib., Morgantown
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Stanley Bing is a columnist for Fortune magazine and the bestselling author of Crazy Bosses, What Would Machiavelli Do?, Throwing the Elephant, Sun Tzu Was a Sizzy, 100 Bullshit Jobs . . . And How to Get Them, and The Big Bing, as well as the novels Lloyd: What Happened and You Look Nice Today. By day he is an haute executive in a gigantic multinational corporation whose identity is one of the worst-kept secrets in business.


More About the Author

Stanley Bing is a columnist for Fortune magazine and the bestselling author of Crazy Bosses, What Would Machiavelli Do?, Throwing the Elephant, Sun Tzu Was a Sissy, 100 Bullshit Jobs..And How to Get Them, and The Big Bing, as well as the novels Lloyd: What Happened and You Look Nice Today. By day he is an haute executive in a gigantic multinational corporation whose identity is one of the worst-kept secrets in business.

Customer Reviews

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Mr. Bing is hilarious and this book is a joy to read.
Lora F.
The book basically equates a Bosses Level of crazy to be in direct correlation to his level of power in the company.
P. Edward Smith
Find this book, read it, keep it tucked under your pillow.
bizwrite@swbell.net

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Quaker Annie on June 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
....of Crazy Bosses! Not only did I have them, I'm sure I was one, too - there's nothing like a corporate environment to bring out interesting tendencies in anyone. When I received an anonymous e-mail at work, with excerpts from this book, I had to have it!
Easy to read, written with wit and actual substance, this book (predecessor to the very popular "Who Moved My Cheese?" and "When Smart People Work for Dumb Bosses") helped get me through some difficult times.
If you can't just stop working to do something you really enjoy -- and not many can, aside from Dilbert's Scott Adams and me -- this book is like an emotional teddy bear with teeth. He defines different "Crazy Bosses" by behavior (most of us are a mix), reasons why they may be that way, and practical ways to work with them, because most of aren't likely to get away from them, even if we change corporations and bosses.
The truth most of us don't want to know is that the insanity of the business world is ours to deal with, not management's to fix. There is no one coming to the rescue - and we each play our own part to the madness, by our own responses. This book is a good aid with suggestions on what to do and what NOT to do, to survive.
We have to rely on our own emotional and physical health, friends, a sense of humor and a sense of our own self-worth (aside from work) so we won't feel like a victim.
The book I found the most helpful throughout my corporate life - and it was great in my real life, too - was M. Scott Peck's "The Road Less Traveled." "Life is difficult," and once we figure that out, we can get on with living! If you are feeling like a victim, read these books and start a discussion with a friend or two!
Good luck - and rest assured that there *is* life after work!
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By bizwrite@swbell.net on May 21, 1998
Format: Paperback
Find this book, read it, keep it tucked under your pillow. It is full of wit, humor, insight . . . and more than a dash of morbid truth. Well-written, it is the kind of book that management professors should have as required reading. This is one of two books that every serious student of business should have in his or her library; the other is "You Can Win at Office Politics," by Dr. Robert Bell. Somehow they are both first-rate writing and first-rate philosophy. Don't say you weren't warned!
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Anthony G Pizza VINE VOICE on October 21, 2000
Format: Paperback
Seemingly written as post-game analysis following an 80s decade of mega mergers, business bungles and greed approval at every level, Stanley Bing's 1992 "Crazy Bosses" was and remains an instructive, if flabbily written and weakly humorous survival guide to dealing with authority's abuse in all forms.
Esquire columnist Bing wears his liberal business and political opinions on his sleeve. References to Nixon, the Reagans, and to candidate Gary Hart abound (the book also features an odd Oliver North analogy). He also name-checks notorious 80s figures like Michael Milken, Ivan Boesky, Jim Bakker, and even Lou Holtz. While some of Bing's many anonymous testimonials shock and surprise (especially one on an alcoholic boss with a surprise happy ending representing his best writing here) many seem like workplace whining from people you also would not wish to work with, let alone for.
Bing properly blames psychotic boss behavior and its effects (obsessive perfectionism, unfair preferences, inconsistent policies) on need for short-term profits, demand to create and chart corporate culture, sycophants who feed need and ego of the powerful (making converts along the way), which in turn exert it over those beneath by stealing time, thought, and morale. Bing delves into these areas with some humor but often unneeded commentaries after quotes that speak well on their own. Yet his comments on workaholism, which in his chapter "Diaster Hunter" he groups with alcoholism, drug abuse, and sexual harrassment, properly expose that trait for the character and family-breaking flaw it is.
Although Bing's recent "What Would Machiavelli Do?
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By P. Bottino on December 31, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The book is well written with lots of stories. I found it to be entertaining; however, I would not purchase again - rather, I would borrow or read library copy. Not enough sustainable material.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jewels8 on May 12, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Hilarious book about boss personality types. Is great for anyone in a stressful job, one with a bad boss, or for anyone with a job who can use a laugh.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By W. Muller on April 11, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Bing really hits the nail on the head with this book. My immediate tyrant is actually two of the types described, which is why he is so irritating. At least now I understand what I have to deal with. Makes life a bit easier. Bing is witty, sarcastic, and makes you feel that he has been there. And I believe that he has. Great book. I am passing it around my office -- with one exception, of course.
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