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Crazy: A Father's Search Through America's Mental Health Madness Paperback – April 3, 2007


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Crazy: A Father's Search Through America's Mental Health Madness + An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley Trade; 1 edition (April 3, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425213897
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425213896
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (145 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,713 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Suffering delusions from bipolar disorder, Mike Earley broke into a stranger's home to take a bubble bath and significantly damaged the premises. That Mike's act was viewed as a crime rather than a psychotic episode spurred his father, veteran journalist Pete Earley (Family of Spies), to investigate the "criminalization of the mentally ill." Earley gains access to the Miami-Dade County jail where guards admit that they routinely beat prisoners. He learns that Deidra Sanbourne, whose 1988 deinstitutionalization was a landmark civil rights case, died after being neglected in a boarding house. A public defender describes how he—not always happily—helps mentally ill clients avoid hospitalization. Throughout this grim work, Earley uneasily straddles the line between father and journalist. He compromises his objectivity when for most of his son's ordeal—Mike gets probation—he refuses to entertain the possibility that the terrified woman whose home Mike trashed also is a victim. And when, torn between opposing obligations, he decides not to reveal to a source's mother that her daughter has gone off her medications, he endangers the daughter's life and betrays her mother. Although this is mostly a sprawling retread of more significant work by psychologist Fuller Torrey and others, parents of the mentally ill should find solace and food for thought in its pages. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

[A] clarion call for change and justice, and an enthralling portrait of a father who refused to surrender. (Bebe Moore Campbell)

Takes readers on a harrowing personal journey... (Senator Pete V. Domenici [R-N.M.] and Nancy Domenici)


More About the Author

Pete Earley is a storyteller who has penned 13 books including the New York Times bestseller The Hot House and the 2007 Pulitzer Prize finalist Crazy: A Father's Search Through America's Mental Health Madness.

After a 14-year career in journalism, including six years at The Washington Post, Pete became a full-time author with a commitment to expose the stories that entertain and surprise.

His honest reporting and compelling writing helped him garner success as one of few authors with "the power to introduce new ideas and give them currency," according to Washingtonian magazine.

When Pete's life was turned upside down by the events recounted in his book Crazy, he joined the National Alliance of Mental Illness to advocate for strong mental health reform on the public stage.

This new advocacy has taken him to 46 different states and multiple countries around the globe where he delivers speeches to rally against the troubled mental health systems and for the mentally ill.

As an author, Pete has been on the receiving end of many accolades, including:

- 2007 Pulitzer Prize Finalist for General Nonfiction
- New York Times Bestseller for The Hot House
- Robert F. Kennedy Award for Social Justice
- Edgar Award Winner for Best Fact Crime Book

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Very well written and easy to read.
Christina Lehrer
Mr. Earley describes his son's bipolar illness as well as his investigation into the Miami-Dade Jail's treatment of mentally ill inmates.
Janet K. Mcneil
I feel like I need to know how to get my community to make a commitment to help turn this thing around!
Susie Peck

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

123 of 128 people found the following review helpful By whatnext on April 24, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For anyone who has either "been there" himself or has watched a loved one descend into madness, this book will seem heartbreakingly familiar. But I fear that only the people who know and understand what Pete Earley and his son, Mike, have been through will buy and read this book. And it's not those people who need to understand just how "crazy" the treatment of the mentally ill in our country is in the 21st century. Until you've seen it from the inside, most people will have no idea that a parent has no power to help a sick child who happens to be 19 years old. That the person who is "crazy" is given the responsibility of making decisions about his care when he is as divorced from reality as he has ever been. That the only way of getting any sort of treatment is to first assault someone or try to kill onesself or another person. The average person has no idea of the hopeless, helpless position someone with a mental illness and their family are put in by the very people who we hope will HELP. As Mr. Earley points out in the book, who among us, particularly those in the medical profession, would walk by a person in pain, dying of cancer, without attempting to help? Who would send that person to jail to be locked up with murderers and rapists instead of to a hospital, where he would be given the medical treatment he needed? Who would suggest that no help could be given to him until he tried to kill himself or someone else? This is what happens to someone's son, daughter, mother, husband every day in this country. Mr. Earley has come to understand mental illness and the horrible state of care and treatment in the United States in a very personal and tragic way, as many, many of us have.Read more ›
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57 of 60 people found the following review helpful By Diana Kern on May 30, 2006
Format: Hardcover
In the book, "Crazy: A Father's Search through America's Mental Health Madness," Pete Earley tells a story that is all too familiar to NAMI members. As an award-winning journalist for over thirty years, Mr. Earley has effectively captured the absurdities of the mental health system in our country through his investigative journalism and his personal understanding of mental illness.

Mr. Earley's son, Mike, has a psychotic episode while in college and breaks into a stranger's home, takes a bubble bath and causes significant damage. Thus begins their long journey into the broken mental health system that so many of us confront everyday in this country. Mr. Earley learns all too quickly just how difficult it is to receive necessary treatment for his son's mental illness. He uses his frustration to launch a personal and professional inquiry into a confusing mental health system coupled with an irrational criminal justice system.

Mr. Earley is granted full access to the Miami-Dade County Jail's "forgotten floor"--the jail's primary psychiatric unit where prisoners are housed without treatment. He can see firsthand that, indeed, our jails and prisons have become the repository for persons with serious mental illness. The prisoners have committed both felonies and petty misdemeanors, all because of their untreated brain disorder. Yet there is no chance at rehabilitation in jails. The prisoners linger in their psychoses for months at a time, only to await a bus ride to a psychiatric facility where they receive minimal treatment in order to have a competency hearing and then are brought back to the jail to await a hearing that will probably never happen.

"Crazy" is a book that NAMI members can use as an advocacy tool to improve mental health care in their communities.
Read more ›
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55 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Dr. B on April 24, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a must read for anyone in the mental health profession, as I am. I think its critical for practitioners to be reminded every now and then about why we got into the profession in the first place, and most importantly what it feels like to be on the receiving end of our services. This book is an intensely personal work, aside from being a fine example of the muckraking tradition that is journalism at its best. I truly admire Mr. Eareley's willingness to tell his own story. Psychosis is not pretty, as any of us who have had a friend or loved one suffer with it know, and its very hard to watch someone loose their mind. The only thing worse would be to watch it happen to your precious child and be powerless to help. I highly recommend this book to parents, practitioners and most strongly to politicians.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth A. Watts on May 23, 2007
Format: Paperback
i have been going crazy trying to get the help my son needs and deserves so he can lead a productive life. he's been in and out of the hospital for the last 3 1/2 yrs, and i dont think the meds are right yet. it is amazing that he has to be "homeless" in order to get the right therapy that he needs in order to make him a productive person later on. i also understand the courts not "getting it". we went through hell when he got arrested for what turned out to be nothing but a clerical error. he spent 9 days in 23 hour lockup without his meds. the police who arrested him, stormed the house he was living in with 27 other mentally ill people, threw him down and cuffed him. i was at his arraignment and on top of the mental health dept at the jail. i was able to get him 1 days worth of medication. there's so much more to this story. the police (and i work with them as a dispatcher) are not trained with mental illness. and i know that for a fact where i work. neither are the 911 operators... something needs to be done. i am in the process of suggesting seminars to my commissioner of police so these things dont happen. good luck to anyone going through this nightmare. it's overwhelming for me. even families dont quite understand it.
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