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Crazy Horse And Chief Red Cloud: Warrior Chiefs- Teton Oglalas Paperback – June 30, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 190 pages
  • Publisher: Four Directions Pub; 2 edition (June 30, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0964517337
  • ISBN-13: 978-0964517332
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #810,792 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Thomas A. Fenton on September 30, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very few histories have been written from the Indian perspective, and therefore this book fills a large gap in our understanding of the nineteenth century and the relationship between Indians and their enemies, the European invaders who determined to relieve them of their most treasured possession, their land. Ed McGaa, also known as Eagle Man, has provided a very valuable resource for those of us who sincerely want to understand our Indian neighbors. ("Neighbor" here is intended to indicate that we share this nation and its history with a race we know little about.) As a small boy, I played "Cowboys and Indians", little knowing that I was playing out a one-sided story based only on my own childish ignorance: cowboys and Indians were arch enemies and always wanted to kill each other. Further, the cowboys were the good guys and the Indians were the bad guys. I did not realize, as a child, that there are two sides to every story. For 45 of my 65 years, I have understood just how wrong my good guy-bad guy understanding was: much of the time, it was the white man who was the bad guy. Today, however, having read two important books telling "the rest of the story", (the other was "Custer's Fall, The Native American Side of The Story" by David Humphreys Miller) I find I would very much like to set down with the author and get to know him as a personal friend. I know that he is a military veteran, a marine, and that, to me, makes him a hero. Not a native American hero: just a hero. Even as a Vietnam veteran, (U.S. Air Force) I find that, like he does, I respect warriors. Mr McGaa, if you should happen to read this review, I would like to say "thank you for your service".Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Guyinthecardboardbox on July 28, 2013
Format: Paperback
I picked up the book a few days back from the author himself, who was very polite and cordial I might add (thank you for the extra book!), as I was intrigued to hear a native's viewpoint on the tumultuous times of the so called "Indian Wars" and the famous native figureheads of the time.

In terms of providing historical insight and perspective, it was top notch. The decision to actually interview native chiefs and hear their side provided an extra layer to the depth of the work itself. It was cohesive and provides a wealth of information about not only the Sioux Nation, but general native-white relationship of the years leading up to even today. The chapter about the musings of the native gentlemen who lived in a missionary was perhaps my favorite, due to the human element it adds to the book.

Now I do have a few complaints with the novel. Understandably, the author himself is a Oglala descendant so it is only natural that he holds his people's histories very seriously and close to his heart. However, he injects his personal bias often times while delivering solid info. This can be detracting if you are attempting to write a history book, especially on such a touchy subject. Luckily it becomes less of a problem further into the book, but it's still an issue nonetheless. Also, he sort of acts what he condemns in the very same book: idealizing a certain view and damning it for another culture ( IE critiquing the white Europeans for being warlike, while his people themselves were constant warriors themselves and is held with certain pride.) It's strange because he manages to address the grey morality of the situation between both parties several times.

All in all, Mr.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tamala Gage on February 24, 2006
Format: Paperback
A Very Honorable Tribute. Thankfully, this rich history has been brought forth. Mitakuye Oyasin.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jan on June 27, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book is okay, the parts about the Crazy Horse and Red Cloud are good but their is a lot in the book that does not pertain to them. I have read about the same in other books that were not by Native Americans. Didn't have much new info, which is what I was going for.
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By Glenda Fulton on January 16, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was for my husband and he loved it
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More About the Author

The Author is an enrolled Oglala Sioux tribal member, OST 15287. After serving in Korea he earned an undergraduate degree (St. Johns University MN). He rejoined the Marine Corps to become a fighter pilot. Major McGaa returned from 110 combat missions to dance in six annual Sioux Sun Dances. He is a Bush Award recipient wherein he studied under two Sioux holy men, Chief Eagle Feather and Chief Fools Crow, and Ben Black Elk, the interpreter for Black Elk Speaks, by John Neihardt. Eagle Man holds a law degree from the University of South Dakota.

The Spirituality Series of books began with a trip to Spain to speak at several colleges and a University. Similar to John Cornwell's (Hitler's Pope) and James Carroll's (Constantine's Sword) who had shocked reactions upon discovering their information in Vatican archives, I was also shocked to discover the reaction of the Spanish populace's negativity regarding Organized Religion. England and Australia were no surprise, however, for I have been hearing their rejecting commentary and viewing their decaying, vacant churches over several decades.