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Crazy Sundays Hardcover – March 19, 1971


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 308 pages
  • Publisher: The Viking Press; 1st edition (March 19, 1971)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 067024550X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670245505
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,186,887 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mike Smith on March 31, 2006
Format: Paperback
With the exception of a bunch of books about "The Great Gatsby," I've never read a biography of F. Scott Fitzgerald other than this one.

And yet this was still very enjoyable.

This is a fascinating, well-written portrait of a successful novelist trying to make it in an element that is not his own. Fitzgerald went from being acclaimed for his books and stories, to being a nobody hired to revise scripts. In Hollywood, no one seemed to care who he was, and life was always a struggle for him--an interesting struggle though, a page-turning struggle, a struggle worth reading about.

Every chapter of the book is a different one of his Hollywood writing projects, and by the end of it all, you are almost certain to have a good idea not only of Fitzgerald's time in Hollywood and of him as a man who "knew more in his books than he did in real life," but of his troubled relationships, his family life, his uneven past, and his ambitions.

This is a very enjoyable book that is very worth reading for any fan of his work, or for anyone interested in the writing process.
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Format: Paperback
This book does a very good, lively job of chronicling Fitzgerald's relationship with show business, from his childhood play writing and directing to his successive, mostly failed encounters with Broadway and Hollywood, to his final, partial success in working it into his great unfinished novel, The Last Tycoon. As biography, however, it is highly unreliable if entertaining because it repeats a lot of made-up stuff by Lilian Hellman and Bill Warren (and possibly others). Hellman never drove Fitzgerald to a party for Ernest Hemingway, Hemingway never moved in with Fitzgerald in Malibu, and Warren never played tennis with a nude Zelda Fitzgerald. (They're good yarns, though.) Latham's appraisal of Fitzgerald's personality and character are consequently skewed-- Mathew Brucoli covers a lot of this in his excellent doorstop-- Some Kind of Epic Grandeur-- so go that for Fitzgerald biography.
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Format: Hardcover
A sprawling yet tightly organized masterpiece about a very good writer coping to survive in a very tough neighborhood, with a first chapter of such poignancy as to be unforgettable.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Didn't quite finish it, although it was a well-written, interesting book. His Hollywood years were so unhappy, one felt a bit mired down as the chapters progressed. There are some great anecdotes.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Martin Turnbull on February 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover
It must have been great to be F. Scott Fitzgerald in the 1920s. He was producing work that was so acclaimed it earned him the sobriquet "the voice of his generation." He was famous, rich, in love, and in Paris. The 1930s, however, were not so kind. He was out-of-print, in debt, his wife, Zelda, was in a sanitarium, and he was in Hollywood tinkering with other people's scripts, most of which never went anywhere. "Crazy Sundays" is an interesting look at how someone can fall from so high to so low. Recommended.
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