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Crazy Water Pickled Lemons: Enchanting Dishes from the Middle East, Mediterranean and North Africa Paperback – August 28, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: MITCH (August 28, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845332849
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845332846
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #94,094 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'A glorious and magical feast for the senses' - Claudia Roden --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Diana Henry writes on food for numerous magazines, including House and Garden, Food and Travel, BBC Good Food Magazine and The English Home. She spent 12 years as a TV producer, making high-profile food programmes, most notably with Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. Diana also worked closely with Antonio Carluccio on his Vegetable book. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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I have had this book for years and have made several recipes from it.
Dinkyknits
What this means is that the finished dish will taste very good, and each bite will have several nuances, while not being heavy.
Joao Jesus
The recipes - so far - are easy to understand and straight-forward to prepare.
love to cook

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By P. Farrell on January 23, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a former culinary instructor and chef, I found this book amazing. Not laid out in the traditional fashion, the author takes each chapter to feature one or two ingredients from Middle East cookery, then describes them so beautifully. The information given at the beginning of each chapter is as delicious as the recipes!
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Sara Roberts on December 30, 2007
Format: Paperback
I bought this book straightaway after thumbing through it. It is what some modern foodies would call pure food porn: there are gorgeous pictures and stories to go with the recipes. One thing I particularly like is that Ms. Henry includes recipes for the condiments such as for preserved lemons and harissa. These items simply aren't available where I live, but I can make them myself for use in the recipes. She also offers reasonable alternatives for many hard-to-find items such as apples or pears for quinces and grape juice/balsamic vinegar mix for grape saba. As another reviewer said, it is not organized in military fashion, but I read cookbooks for fun, so that is no nevermind to me. The comments on the "odd" typeface elude me--I find nothing wrong with it,as it seems no different from other modern cookbook formats. This is a fun overview cookbook for mediterranean cooking that is a good place for new cooks to start exploring these food genres. For the experienced cook it is a fun read and has some off the beaten track recipes.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dinkyknits on December 16, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have had this book for years and have made several recipes from it. Yes, some of them are a bit involved, but for a special meal, they make the whole experience of creating the dish special.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By jj foodie on October 23, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is the most beautiful cookbook! It was given to me as a gift and i have cooked about half the dishes in it. I have never ever tried a dish without being blown away by how amazing the flavours are. No matter how strange the combination of ingredients may sound, everytime it is superb (the rosemary lemon cake is to die for). The way it is arranged by ingredients as opposed to "salads" "main course" etc. is what makes this such a delightful book. There are millions of books out there that are divided like that-if that is what you are after then get an A-Z of cooking. Instead, Henry divides into groups, sweet, citrus, fruits of longing (fig, pomegranate and all the exotic like) and has recipes that revolve around this theme. This encourages you to think about how to use ingredients in both sweet and savoury ways. It is for the cook who is interested in trying something a little different, however all the recipes are easy enough for anyone who has a reasonable understanding of cooking.I prefer cookbooks that involve you in all aspects as opposed to how to cook something in 10 minutes. Crazy water pickled lemon does just that, with beautiful introductions explaining how the recipes made it into the book. A fantastic buy for the cook who wants to create beautiful dishes.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Wild Thing Foodie on December 2, 2013
Format: Paperback
Fortunately I discovered this writer when one of her cookbooks, Plenty, was greatly reduced. I immediately borrowed or bought her other ones. For the reasons that other reviewers have deducted stars, I have added them. Her layouts make sense - and her words inform and inspire to try it and her recipes work. Artistically, the photographs work well and transports me on this particular culinary journey. Her recipes for ice cream(raisin and sherry or lemon and basil) do not require an ice cream maker! I wish that I had bought this cookbook first - as my introduction to Middle Eastern flavours and cookery. Honestly, I have not cooked from any of my Claudia Roden or Paula Wolfert cookbooks on the same subject. Ms. Henry takes all fear out of cooking. This cookbook compliments my three Ottolenghi ones.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By LA on September 17, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is a beautiful book. I am happy with most of the recipes. However, there is a lot of meat and sauce drenched fish recipes which I'm not a fan of. If you are then, I think it's a perfect book for you. The vegetable and rice dishes are great. So over all I think it's a well rounded book. Not amazing, but good.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By I. Darren on January 31, 2013
Format: Hardcover
A strange, intriguing title for a book that sets out to intrigue and enchant, showcasing many dishes from the Middle East, North Africa and Mediterranean. Hopefully you will fall under the food's spell and get cooking for yourself.
Firstly, this is not a book for those with tired, middle-aged eyes (or in other words those with not so-perfect sight). The choice of font and styling makes this book hard to read from a comfortable distance. This is a shame as it creates a barrier to leisurely browsing and can lead to a greater risk of `food damage' and staining as you may be constantly lifting it up and putting it down whilst cooking. A small but important thing. Greater thought to the layout and a few more pages might have made a world of difference - particularly as we are not talking about a cheap paperback book.
Each chapter focusses on a few ingredients, giving a brief overview of their origins, history and use before then providing many recipes and accompanying rich photography for you to try at your leisure. It is an interesting combination of learning and cooking that might not appeal to everybody. If you are a `find a recipe and make it' sort of person it might not be your cup of tea but if you value a more immersive experience then you will be rewarded - just as long as you can comfortably read the text!
The recipes are split by key ingredient type rather than by country of origin which makes sense, however the lack of a really useful table of contents means that the book is possibly not as accessible and as useful for everyday cooking as it should be. At the back there is a fairly comprehensive index but that is not the point. An index and a table of contents might look similar but they do two separate tasks.
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