Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Cream: Live At The Royal Albert Hall 2005 Box set

4.4 out of 5 stars 147 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Listen Now with Prime Music Join Prime Prime Members
Price
New from Used from
Vinyl, Box set, April 20, 2013
$120.00

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream millions of songs FREE with Amazon Prime. Start your free trial.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Check Out Our Turntable Store
    Need a new record player? Check out our turntable store for a great selection of turntables, needles, accessories, and more.

Editorial Reviews

Cream reunited in the spring of 2005, setting aside nearly 40 years of acrimony for a series of gigs at the Royal Albert Hall in May, which was later followed by a few shows at Madison Square Garden about a month after souvenirs of the London shows

Product Details

  • Vinyl (April 20, 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Format: Box set
  • Note on Boxed Sets: During shipping, discs in boxed sets occasionally become dislodged without damage. Please examine and play these discs. If you are not completely satisfied, we'll refund or replace your purchase.
  • Label: Reprise Records
  • ASIN: B00C1CHOK4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (147 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #500,502 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Cream Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By o dubhthaigh VINE VOICE on October 7, 2005
Format: Audio CD
... than before. Cream was always one of those shizoid bands: studio efforts overdubbed, well produced psychedelia, live shows a tsunami of three soloists having a go at it simultaneously on an Anglo-blues catalogue. Here, for the first time I can remember hearing, they play more like a BAND. There is a locked in cohesion to this show that was never present before, as you can clearly hear when you compare this to the farewell show from '69. These three coined the cliche "supergroup" and were known for playing with a ferocity fueled by their competitive egos. Perhaps as age has slowed them all down and as time has taken its toll on them and their colleagues, the notion of working more in step with each other brings more significant rewards.

It certainly does to the material. Their take here on Willie Dixon, Booker T Jones, Skip James and T-Bone have all the swagger of the masters and less of the youthful unrestrained testosterone of the late 60's. "Born Under a Bad Sign" and "Spoonful" would make their authors proud. "Badge" suffers from Clapton having so thoroughly redefined it with his band that it seems nothing but perfunctory here. However, Baker's bizarre reading of "... Wart..." is so weird that it seems to have gained in its spooky evocation of something both Dickensian and psychedelic. In the case of each of the musicians, they are clearly listening to each other and playing better as a unit than you would ever have any right to expect. There is a supple pwer and subtlety to how integrated they are in each other's rhythms that is inspiring. Given the mediocrity of Clapton's BACK HOME, this is a delightful return to form. He isn't the GOD that he was on Cream's first surfacing, but that was just another way of clotting the music from flowing.
Read more ›
2 Comments 121 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
The original power rock trio Cream reunited for the first time in thirty-seven years for a string of concerts at the place they played their last shows, Royal Albert Hall. Anyone expecting the band to be as fierce and experimental as they were then is just unfair. Most acts mellow with age and lose their youthful aggression. Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce & Ginger Baker are no different. Despite this, the band is quite tight on the album. There aren't the lengthy jams of the old days, but that is made up for by sharper and more focused playing. Mr. Bruce's bass is still quite heavy and although he can't hit all the high notes, his voice is still fluid. Mr. Clapton doesn't cut loose as much, but his phrasing and styling is impeccable. Mr. Baker's drumming is less erratic and adds a more solid backbeat. All the favorites like "Crossroads", "White Room", "Sunshine Of Your Love", "I'm So Glad" and "Spoonful" are included as well as some nuggets like "Pressed Rat & Warthog", "Deserted Cities Of The Heart" and "Badge".
Comment 50 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
A review I read about the Live CD's of Cream in the 1960's not inspiring, well I can say to you, "Cream's reunion 2005 DVD". I can not stop watching this performance, it is so outstanding. Eric Clapton's fantastic guitar work during this reunion is inspirational, and is essential listening to any Cream or Eric Clapton fan.

Eric, with original members Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker performing like the superstars of old, rock the Albert Hall to the delight of thousands who were fortunate enough to be there. For us, the unlucky, this great 2 DVD Set can be ordered, and when played on a surround sound/ big screen system, this show comes alive. With outstanding editing, a high quality soundtrack, excellant near HD quality picture, this concert is at the top of my top ten list. This DVD sets the standard for outstanding music DVD videos.
Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
When this band formed in the mid-1960s, Eric Clapton envisioned Cream as a blues trio. As history has shown, things didn't quite turn out that way. Forty years later, Slowhand finally got his wish. There are blues numbers here in abundance from the likes of Willie Dixon, Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, T-Bone Walker, Albert King, and Skip James. Recorded 37 years after their final proper concert at this same venue in 1968, time may have ravaged their looks, but definitely not their playing. As another reviewer has stated in these pages, Cream acts like a band this time around rather than as a group of egotistical soloists going for the jugular night after night as they did "back in the day." The jams for which Cream are renowned are kept to a tolerable length. Most songs on this collection clock in around 5-6 minutes. Those that do go long (Stormy Monday, Spoonful, We're Going Wrong, Sunshine, Toad) do not suffer as a result.

As it was back in their heyday, each member is afforded his own showcase. For Jack Bruce, it's "Rollin' And Tumblin'." On this number Jack, accompanied by his harmonica (no bass), Eric playing the slide, and Ginger Baker on the drums, stuns and amazes the crowd with an energy that belies the fact that the man nearly died in 2003. Eric Clapton's showcase is the T-Bone Walker classic "Stormy Monday." This is a new song for Cream as it was never on an official Cream release until this collection came out. Slowhand demonstrates that when he wants to, he is the master of the blues guitar. The man was simply on fire the night they recorded this song. Ginger Baker's showcase was, of course, the drum solo "Toad." By and large, drum solos are usually excuses to head to the bathroom or the concession stand. Not so here. "Toad" is simply compelling.
Read more ›
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: uriah heep vinyl