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Created and Produced by Total Television Productions Paperback – June 11, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 380 pages
  • Publisher: BearManor Media; 1st edition (June 11, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593933452
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593933456
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,558,214 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Mark Arnold (1966- ) was born in San Jose, California. He is a comic book and animation historian, and has had many articles published in various publications. He has a BA in Broadcast Communication Arts from San Francisco State and has performed many celebrity interviews. He has published "The Harveyville Fun Times!" since 1990 and published his first book "The Best of the Harveyville Fun Times!" in 2006. His second book "Created and Produced by Total TeleVision productions: The Story of Underdog, Tennessee Tuxedo and the Rest" was published in 2009 by BearManor Media. His third and fourth book for BearManor called "If You're Cracked, You're Happy: The Story of Cracked Mazagine, Book 1 and Book 2" and a fifth book called "Mark Arnold Picks on The Beatles" were issued in 2011. His sixth book is called "Frozen in Ice: The Story of Walt Disney Productions: 1966-1985" was published in 2013. He is working on a book about DePatie-Freleng (Pink Panther) and another book about Harvey Comics. He has also produced and recorded DVD commentaries for Shout! Factory and has helped the San Francisco Cartoon Art Museum with various art shows. He resides in Saratoga, CA.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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A few years ago Keith Scott published his excellent and authoritative book on all things Jay Ward, The Moose That Roared: The Story of Jay Ward, Bill Scott, a Flying Squirrel, and a Talking Moose, all about the history of Jay Ward's animation studio and the cartoons he produced for sponsor General Mills for television in the 60s, particularly Rocky and Bullwinkle and Dudley Do-Right, etc. Over the years various syndication packages of Jay Ward's creations have been mixed and mingled with another batch of cartoons that he did not create, though many have believed that he did. These include the ever popular Underdog and Tennessee Tuxedo cartoons, as well as the The King and Odie, Go Go Gophers, Commander McBragg and others. These cartoons were actually produced for General Mills at about the same time by another studio, Total Television Productions (or TTV). Style and (limited)animation-wise the early cartoons of Jay Ward and TTV are visually similar, having utilized the same Mexican animation studio (Val-Mar/Gamma Productions, a cost-saving venture of General Mills, their advertising agency and others). In Scott's book the TTV cartoons are briefly mentioned and panned mildly as being "pleasant diversions", but not up to Jay Ward's caliber and "screamingly unfunny". Yet many remember them fondly.

This new book by Mark Arnold serves as a complement to the Scott book to tell the real history and facts about Total Television Productions and their cartoons. It offers the inside story on the origins of the studio, the people and talent involved involved, and the characters they created.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Barat on August 9, 2009
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Over the past two decades, Mark Arnold has done yeomanlike service in preserving memories of various pieces of fondly recalled pop culture that have, for one reason or another, fallen by the wayside (though fond memories of them may linger on). Most of his efforts have gone towards commemorating the legacy of Harvey Comics in his fine fanzine, THE HARVEYVILLE FUN TIMES!. For more than 15 years, I've written the RICHVILLE RUMINATIONS column for that magazine and therefore can testify directly to Mark's love for the subject matter. Now, Mark has favored us with a book on the unjustly overlooked output of Total TeleVision productions, a cartoon producer in the paradoxical position of having created several of the best-loved animated TV series of the 1960s, yet currently languishing in such obscurity that (gasp!) no one has even bothered to create a Wikipedia page wholly devoted to the company. Though Mark's book isn't as tightly organized as I might have liked, he presents by far the most detailed and enlightening history of TTV that has appeared to date.

Past reference works that have touched upon TTV's output have tended to be condescending at best and disdainful at worst, often making disparaging remarks that compare the company's work unfavorably to that of the Jay Ward Studios.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Marc Jay Levenson on October 1, 2009
Format: Paperback
Mark has captured a cherished memory that I'd almost forogtten was there. When I opened his book and thumbed through the pages, rushes of wonderful laughter surged back. Underdog, Tennessee Tuxedo, Commander McBragg, the Go Go Gophers--these were characters and stories that were created by true TV geniuses. Sadly, their style and creativity have disappeared. But Mark has brought back their innovative magic, along with the inside stories of the creators, animators, and the voices which brought such ridiculous fun to life. I grew up with Sandy Becker (a New York TV genius in his own right), and his voice is part of the stories which Mark resurrects (remember Tooter Turtle??). I didn't realize that Tennessee Tuxedo's mentor, Mr. Woopee, was courtesy the voice of Larry Storch. I can't get his voice out of my mind now! This was a wonderful book for anyone who wants to know the true stories behind some of TV's most unforgettable cartoon characters. Gotta go now. Stanley Livingston is back at the zoo! Chumley!!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By LEONARD J. KOHL on April 3, 2012
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I am an animated cartoon fan who was born at the tail end of the so-called "Baby Boom Generation" - I was born in 1958, so most of the TTV cartoons I saw as a youngster were already in syndicated packages - except for UNDERDOG and some of the later shows, which I saw as they originally aired on TV. Like so many cartoon fans, we all wondered what Jay Ward and Co. had to do with these cartoons, as they seemed similar to the Ward stuff, and yet they were NOT! Thnaks to Mark Arnold, he has set the record straight!

Luckily for Mr. Arnold, he was able to interview the key personnel behind Total TeleVision productions. Too bad he wasn't able to contact Jackson Beck and some of the other voice actors to fill in some gaps of the history. The reviewer who complains about some KING AND ODIE episodes not being available doesn't realize that these cartoons were not archived and preserved like much (not all) of the work of the Disney Studio. It's like cartoonist Joe Harris bemoaning the fact that he got rid of a bunch of UNDERDOG storyboards and animation cels to free up storage space? Who knew this stuff would be so valuable?! I myself have tried - and tried - in vain to locate ANYTHING about the lost 1930s radio episodes of CHANDU THE MAGICIAN for a book project. Nothing seems to exist, and I have contacted sons, daughters and grandchildren of the people involved with the radio shows - and they have nothing but a few memories! So, be glad that Mr. Arnold and some collectors have been able to find what does exist!

Oh, one minor correction! Jackson Beck was not hired by the "Fleischer brothers" to do the voice of "Bluto" in the POPEYE cartoons. Beck was hired by Famous Studio people in 1944 - or possible earlier - to do the voice. William Pennell was indeed the first "voice" for "Bluto.
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Created and Produced by Total Television Productions
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