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Creating a New Civilization: The Politics of the Third Wave Hardcover – March 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Turner Pub; 1st edition (March 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1570362246
  • ISBN-13: 978-1570362248
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,350,050 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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See all 16 customer reviews
Knowledge without ethics, empathy or vision does not make you smart.
FrankRelax
I could read and comprehend everything they said, but the failure of the Tofflers to be speific of HOW this is going to happen plauged me throughout the book.
"player31"
I've been reading Alvin Toffler for over 30 years and continue to look forward to what comes next.
Loren P Ameen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Shalom Freedman HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on July 11, 2008
Format: Paperback
Toffler's great book was the first one 'Future Shock'. What came after did not have the newness, and the freshness- and it did not shock.
This work too is a replay of Tofflers' often repeated notion of human development in three great phases, an Agricultural , Industrial and now Information Age. There is truth in this picture but it is far too simplistic and one- dimensional to encompass the realities of our world. Take for instance the Energy question which the Tofflers seemed to feel would have a relatively easy solution when they wrote this book in the early nineties. Here we are well into the first decade of the twenty- first century and the non- renewable fossil fuel resource is causing havoc with Civilization as a whole.
Morever even when there are developments which reenforce the Toffler picture of our living in an 'Information Age' they come in surprising unpredictable ways which raise serious questions on many fronts. The development of the Internet would seem to strengthen Toffler's main idea of our moving into an Information Age Economy, one in which customization, and de- massification are central. Consider the multiplication of Media and of human expression which the Internet has allowed. This would seem to be a kind of consummate proof of the Toffler thesis. Yet look also at the possible 'dumbing down' of the population, at the undermining in certain areas of the integrity of the 'knowledge industry' in the Academy. Consider such political phenomena as the rise of Radical Islam and the way their terrorists make use of 'information age' technology to threaten and attack others.
The Tofflers' view of the Future is too one- sidedly optimistic. And it too in my opinion , 'arrogant' in its assumption that their idea or ideas understand it all.
Their book has some interesting suggestions about what the human future will look like, but they certainly do not 'see it all'- not even the half of it.
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20 of 27 people found the following review helpful By FrankRelax on November 23, 2011
Format: Paperback
When I was in my early 20s I read a book called 'The Third Wave' by Alvin Toffler. It completely changed my life. It made clear the things I felt happening in the world and explained them in a way I still carry with me today. I became a Toffler devotee and read everyone of his 1000+ page books. Then in 1995 he wrote a small 200 word book with Newt Gingrich about the future of politics. It was the worse piece of crap I had ever read. It made no sense. It's ideas were vapid and muddled. Someone recently said that Newt is "a stupid guys idea of what a smart person sounds like." I completely agree. Knowledge without ethics, empathy or vision does not make you smart. It makes you dangerous.
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Format: Paperback
...then this might be an option, because it's just a rework and condensation of its predecessor. It also sports an intro written by Newt Gingrich; I have no idea why unless he was selected to provide an unintentional but effective example of outdated Second Wave power politics.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Eugene A Jewett on June 13, 2002
Format: Paperback
Toffler is a big thinker. His premise in this book as well as in his other books is that just as the agricultural first wave has given way to the second wave industrial age, that it in turn has yielded to the third knowledge revolution. He outlines the differences and prescribes the need for change.
In that men have difficulty adjusting to change (see "Who Moved My Cheese"), Toffler outlines how these clashes will be resolved. Just as companies in growth industries altenate between spurts of growth and plateaus of consolidation, societies experience the same disruptions. The Austrian school of economics would call it "creative destruction".
This book's core principles emanate from the mind of a visionary thinker. If you want a top-down view of the last couple of centuries it's worth the few hours of reading and thinking you'll have to invest.
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11 of 16 people found the following review helpful By michael jennings on June 20, 1998
Format: Paperback
Authors' Alvin and Heidi Toffler would have readers believe that the world is being carried along by an inevitable tidal force of events known as the 'Third Wave' which, in turn, will effect the creation of a new civilization. While the arrival of a 'knowledge culture' will no doubt affect and change life as we know it, the 'information age' is in and of itself no guarantor of an emerging world order. The prediction "that we are the final generation of an old civilization and the first generation of a new one" is based on the authors' unswerving belief in inevitable progress. Inevitable progress is the belief that the forward movement of history is certain to happen. They assert that the technological, economical, political and cultural upheavals that are now taking place are not random or chaotic occurrences but rather, "nothing less than a global revolution, a quantum leap". The basis of this analysis is the conviction that a "clearly discernible pattern" exists and thus warrants such a claim. How can the authors' be so certain that a revolutionary 'Third Wave' civilization is destined to arrive on planet earth? The Tofflers's use of the questionable assumption of inevitable progress to reach a conclusive view of the future is insufficient and regrettable. The book's nine chapters, of which seven are previously published, form an accessible introduction to the Toffler's views on where the world is going.
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26 of 39 people found the following review helpful By "player31" on May 30, 2002
Format: Paperback
Since I had never read the previous three books maybe I was thrown into the deep-end on this one. I could read and comprehend everything they said, but the failure of the Tofflers to be speific of HOW this is going to happen plauged me throughout the book.
For instance, the book never delves into HOW specifically the third wave (information age for those who haven't read it) will affect families in a positive way. Instead it uses catch phrases like "empower the family" and "restore functions to the family" which mean....nothing. On top of that, numerous .../false assumptions cripple this book.
To say that "Naderites and Buchananites" are the same because they both think that NAFTA is wrong is false because Nader and Buchanan want to get rid of it for different reasons. Also when they say that NAFTA was a triumph for the 3rd wave and that the second wave (industrial age) is on a decline are also lies. The jobs for factory workers aren't simply going away - they're moving where labor is cheap and taxes are low.
Also, scare tactics and ... hurt this book for those who can see through it. The idea that American companies are being out-competed by samll businesses and foreign corporations and that is why companies are breaking up into smaller components, merging, and laying off workers are sheer lies. Keeping in mind that this book was wrote in the early to mid-ninties, and then looking at the stock market and the decline of small business, you can easily see why this was going on; Merge because two huge corperations working together can squash the copmetition, and layoff because that will bring your market value up.
Also the Toffler's idea that "it is knowledge, not cheap labor...that add value." - yeah well tell that to Nike.
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