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81 of 86 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Most Important Management Book Written Since Peter Drucker Defined the Practice of Management
Creating a World Without Poverty should be read by everyone who is concerned about helping the poor and those whose needs are ignored.

If I could give this book one hundred stars, I would; that would still be too few. Books have the potential to advance and create discussions about ideas, concepts, and practices that can reform everything we do in needed...
Published on January 31, 2008 by Donald Mitchell

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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Simplistic view on business
Let me say that I assign Yunnus' earlier book to my classes to read. He and the story of microcredit while controversial have clearly inspired much good work in the world. I expected to enjoy this book.

Unfortunately I found this book to be far too simplistic on the business side. The hypothesis boils down to "Businesses make money, and then some rich people...
Published on April 1, 2011 by J. Davis


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81 of 86 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Most Important Management Book Written Since Peter Drucker Defined the Practice of Management, January 31, 2008
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
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Creating a World Without Poverty should be read by everyone who is concerned about helping the poor and those whose needs are ignored.

If I could give this book one hundred stars, I would; that would still be too few. Books have the potential to advance and create discussions about ideas, concepts, and practices that can reform everything we do in needed directions. Creating a World Without Poverty is one of the few books I've ever read that fulfills that potential.

Professor Yunus (co-winner with the Grameen Bank of the Nobel Prize for Peace in 2006) has written an extremely thoughtful and thought-provoking work that successfully argues for a new type of organization to serve the unserved among the poor, the social business. A social business seeks to optimize social benefits rather than profits. In defining its purpose, a social business begins by defining a social need that wouldn't otherwise be served. Profits are kept at the minimum level needed to keep the enterprise viable. Ideally, no dividends are paid to owners. The original investors get a return of their capital, and then the organization is purchased by the poor . . . using microcredit from organizations like the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh. The Grameen Bank is a model for such an enterprise, and in the book Professor Yunus describes several other ventures that the Grameen Bank has initiated with partners steeped in expertise related to the needs of the poor.

Professor Yunus describes his experiences in founding the Grameen Bank and the lessons he learned from this work:

1. The poor are very capable of solving problems -- survival needs have honed their skills.

2. Poor people often need very few resources to pull themselves out of poverty. They are used to making do with little and will frugally expand a small farm or business.

3. Many poor people are poor because they are exploited by those who loan them money, provide supplies, and purchase their offerings. By providing inexpensive microcredit, poor people can escape from that exploitation.

4. By helping the whole family make progress, you can lift a family out of poverty permanently through more income, savings, capital, improved living conditions, and education.

5. By focusing on helping poor women, the resources are used most effectively.

6. Poor women are good credit risks.

7. Some needs cannot be met without adding expertise that the poor don't have (such as developing more nutritional, low-cost snacks for youngsters) but which those in profit-making companies often do have.

8. Some leaders of profit-making companies are moved to make a difference for the poor and can assist in establishing new enterprises to solve important problems that plague the poor (blindness, malnutrition, and lack of communications).

9. Creating social businesses uses a lot fewer resources than charity or government initiatives and leads to better results for the poor.

The book goes into some detail in describing the development of the Grameen Bank (which makes small loans -- usually around $100 -- to poor people who lack collateral to qualify for loans at traditional banks) and a recent social business start-up by Groupe Danone and Grameen Bank to provide a nutritional yogurt snack in Bangladesh. There is also a description of plans for a social business venture to provide eye care sponsored by Grameen Bank that is being helped through training at Aravind Eye Hospital in India (you can read about Aravind in The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid).

The book's vision is wider than what I have just described. Professor Yunus has considered how the world might be filled with such social businesses and how they might operate (competitive salaries for employees, engaging poor people as suppliers, distributors, customers, and employees as much as possible, stock markets for the shares in such firms, and ways that more initial capital might be generated by foundations, governments, investors, and for-profit businesses). He has also done some fine thinking about the governance challenges of such enterprises.

I think what he is describing will work. I've seen partial prototypes operating in the United States. In major cities in the United States, some hospitals that serve the poor have added high-profit surgery centers to earn funds to pay for the medical care given to the poor. Aravind charges those who can pay full price for cataract surgery and uses the profits to provide free surgery to poor people. Some companies been left to charities by their founders at death with the dividends of the companies used to help the poor (Hershey had such an origin in helping orphans). But remember that Professor Yunus's model is broader than that . . . the social business should develop a new business model that innovates in serving the poor in new ways, not just subsidize serving the poor in old ways.

I have been writing about continuing business model innovation since 2003 and can assure you that Professor Yunus is on the right track with his prescriptions. In a world where we often make fun of economists, it's nice to know that there's one who can climb down from the ivory tower to appreciate the potential of applied microeconomics to the causes of problems for poor people.

I particularly liked the concept of having poor people be part of the solutions. Poor people know what they need better than anyone else does. Their solutions are going to be the most effective ones.

Lest you think this is all over optimism, Bangladesh has seen the level of poverty in the country transformed by these kinds of changes. The day is not too distant when Bangladesh will know about poverty only through visiting museums that describe what it used to be like. The poverty rate has fallen from 74 percent in 1974-75 to 40 percent in 2005. That's still too high, but it's a huge reduction in only three decades in a country without natural advantages other than the ingenuity and hard work of its people.

It is Professor Yunus's wish that poverty only be seen in museums throughout the world.

He also points out that global environmental problems need to be solved or low-lying Bangladesh will be under water from global warming that melts the polar ice. It's a sobering thought.

Bravo, Professor Yunus!
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51 of 57 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Savior of Capitalism, January 10, 2008
The author has proven that capitalism, if it accepts a social conscince out of self-preservation, can eventually develop a world where poverty is on the decline. Yunus is one of the most deserving of recipients of the Nobel Prize. He has been recognized by many, including former president Bill Clinton, as a financial reformer of very high order. The author is not a reving socialist but a reasonable person who believes the responsibility of every individual is to leave the world a better place for those to whom we will leave it. Instead of depending entirely on charity to combat poverty and ease the suffering of those who don't have the material benefits needed for survival, they should be given an oportunity to make their own way in the community.

This is a book that should be carefully read by every person who is interested in a more secure world, in easing human suffering, in providing opportunity to every individual to meet his or her potential, and certainly every politician world wide who has the courage to do what is right and not just politically expedient.

I have given this book five stars. In the past many others have gotten this rating, and this is the most deserving.
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most significant book on economics in recent times, February 15, 2008
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Arup Biswas (Campbell, CA USA) - See all my reviews
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Have you ever pondered why the raw capitalism prescribed by Adam Smith that became successful in raising the standard of living at the early stages of its development, lost it's steam after a certain phase? Why it leads to staggering inequality of income, destruction of the environment and social injustice?

In this book, Nobel Laureate Dr. Yunus suggests the reason is in the basic flaw in the assumption of Adam Smith, that man is a one dimensional being, his only motive in the world is to maximize the profit. If profit maximization is the only yardstick of the success of a business, why should the corporations care about other factors like social responsibility, sustainability or social justice?

Dr. Yunus, in this book, proposes another model of business, which he calls Social Business. In this business model, the goal is not profit maximization, but a specific social benefit, for example, providing nutrition among the population. The social business is not a charity, because, it returns the original investment back to the investor. But, it reinvests the profits back to the business to maximize its social goal. Dr.Yunus is not an ivory tower economist, but a very down-to-earth pragmatist, who has founded a score of Social Businesses in his own country Bangladesh and other underdeveloped parts of the world. As a result of his work, millions of people have come out of poverty.

In this book, he also explains the concept of micro-finance, a small amount of money, usually less than hundred dollars lent to the poor people, who can then use this money for running a small business. This generates income and help them rise above the poverty level. According to Dr. Yunus, the poor people always pay back the money. After reading the book, I have become interested in investing some money in micro-finance. If you like the idea check out [...]or similar micro-finance sites. A small amount of your money may make a huge difference in people's lives and you get your original money back.

Dr. Yunus writes in simple, lucid language. The book will engage you and definitely enrich your world view. If you have time to read just one book this year, I would suggest this one.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Simplistic view on business, April 1, 2011
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This review is from: Creating a World Without Poverty: Social Business and the Future of Capitalism (Paperback)
Let me say that I assign Yunnus' earlier book to my classes to read. He and the story of microcredit while controversial have clearly inspired much good work in the world. I expected to enjoy this book.

Unfortunately I found this book to be far too simplistic on the business side. The hypothesis boils down to "Businesses make money, and then some rich people profit. Why not give the poor ownership so that they profit?" This would be fine if every business succeeded, but they don't.

- Starting a business takes risk capital. Someone is on the line to lose money. Whoever is on the line to lose money puts their money there because they are gambling they will make money. You can't ask people to risk losing their money without any hope to make more.

- The average new business does not make money. Venture capitalists on average return negative interest to their investors. Investors put their money there because they are gambling that they will win big.

- Yunnus is not an average guy, he can negotiate deals others (even business leaders) can't.

- The Dannon deal does not appear to actually be good business for Dannon, it appears to be good CSR public relations.

All this doesn't take away from the fact that I think Social Business is a good idea. But I find the strict interpretation which completely removes a profit motive to be unrealistic. You need to get your startup capital from somewhere and that person has to want to give it to you.

Despite my lukewarm review, this is an important point in the overall debate about how to get social work done: pure non-profit, for-profit business without profit motive (this book), for-profit startup funded by a Foundation with no expectation of positive return (so far the Foundations aren't too excited to do this, but there are some), for-profit startup funded by a social VC with expectation of return (there are a growing number of these), pure for-profit (most business leaders think their business _is_ producing social good and economists generally would agree with this, but most non-profits wouldn't really agree), joint 501c3 and for-profit in partnership. The jury is still out and I think over the next 10 years we'll start to get enough data points to see what really works.
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34 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars TEN star must read Wow this is excellent!, January 11, 2008
This is one of those books that is so worth your time and money. Don't confuse the authors suggestion that with wise planning and micro loans which he won the Nobel Prize for, we will make the world a place where everyone owns a car, lives in a big house and is as materialistic as we Americans.

No. What he writes about is how we can make it so that every person and their family can have the basics of human life and dignity so they lack for none of the necessities of life. Like clean water, decent housing and health care, and educational choices so they are literate and able to do better where they live.

Its why I donate to groups like Heifer International which brings meaning to the adage that if you give a fish to a person they eat for a day but if your teach them how to fish they will eat for a lifetime.

I also like the challenges to big business to stop using people and giving them things they don't need which are unhealthy, but have am ethical corporate mindset where you strive to help people have clean water, food and none of the inferior goods that sadly we Americans are known for.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars High on rhetoric, short on action, September 7, 2008
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Professor Yunus' book pales in comparison to his Banker to the Poor - this current book is light on action and heavy on rhetoric. It does tell a story about how he was able to create a social enterprise - using his connections as a Nobel Prize winner and book author.

It does not give any type of action plan on how the typical person could arrange a social business or even more their company more toward a social function. I was disappointed as it was more a book of opinions and far-flung ideas about how to create institutions like social stock markets, etc., and little about how to actionably help the poor.

In all, an interesting book, but mostly due to Yunus' writing style and easy of telling stories. It contains some short history but not enough action. I highly prefer C.K. Prahalad's Fortune at the Bottom of The Pyramid for more direct guidance on how this has been done.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspirational!, February 5, 2009
This review is from: Creating a World Without Poverty: Social Business and the Future of Capitalism (Paperback)
Sixty percent of the world's population live on 6% of the world's income. Borrowing money for them is so expensive that little benefits results from doing so. Microcredit offers poor people small, collateral-free loans, often as little as the equivalent of $30-40 dollars, to use for starting tiny businesses. In 31 years, millions in Bangladesh alone have used microcredit; by the end of 2006 100 million had benefited worldwide.

Bangladesh has 145 million in an area the size of Wisconsin; fortunately, it's birthrate has dropped from 6.3 children/mother in 1975 to 3.3 in 1999, and continues to drop.

Grameen Bank staffers have responsibility for about 600 borrowers, and are evaluated according to repayment record, whether his work generates a profit, mobilizes more in deposits than his outstanding loans, if the children of all his borrowers go to school, and if all his borrowers move out of poverty.

Grameen Bank has given out loans totaling $6 billion, a 98.6% repayment rate, has not taken donations since 1995, been profitable most years, and 64% of those who've been with the bank at least five years are out of poverty.

Grameen Bank began providing housing loans in 1984 ($125) - used to construct 650,000 loans.

Borrowers each belong to self-made groups of five friends, no two of whom are closely related. Approval is needed by each of the other four for one to take out a loan. Ten-twelve such groups come together for weekly meeting in a center built by them in their own village. There are over 130,000 centers around the country, each serving 50-60 members. At weekly meetings, loan repayments are collected by local branch officers, new applications submitted, and new ideas presented (including health and nutrition). Leadership is elected.

All members pledge to follow the following "decisions:" We shall bring prosperity to our families, not live in dilapidated houses, grow vegetables all year round and sell the surplus, plan to keep our families small, build and use pit latrines, educate our children, boil water before using or use alum to purify it, use pitcher filters to remove arsenic, not take or give any dowry at our children's' weddings, not practice child marriage, not inflict injustice on anyone, nor allow anyone to do so, all help each other, and take part in all social activities collectively. Grameen Bank awards the children of its borrowers over 30,000 scholarships/year, and another 18,000 are using student loans.

Grameen Bank charges simple interest, and the total interest can never exceed the amount borrowed. Income-generating loans charge 20%, 8% for housing loans, student loans at 0% while in school and 5% after. Outstanding loans are forgiven upon death. Pension-fund deposits made every month/week for ten years are doubled - this source makes up 53% of total deposits.

Grameen Bank also operates 25 companies - health care basic services for the poor at $2/year, food for the poor (low-cost yogurt - healthy, helps control diarrhea), IT solutions, knitwear for export, solar power, Internet provision, etc. Improving health is a major goal as the government services are inadequate and people need alternatives to quacks and village healers.

The author believes that the most effective anti-poverty programs are specifically tailored to the poor, not general projects for serving society - infrastructure, health care, job training etc. benefit mostly those hired to provide the service.

Yunus was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his effots; his dream is to put poverty into a museum.
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30 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Other Side of C. K. Prahalad's Fortune at the Bottom, February 13, 2008
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I realized close to two years ago, after reading C. K. Prahalad's The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid: Eradicating Poverty Through Profits (Wharton School Publishing Paperbacks), that I wanted to be intelligence officer to the poor instead of to a president, and that I needed to create the field of public intelligence (decision support for everyone at no cost). I strongly recommend that the two books be read together. See my review of that book. See also John Bogle's The Battle for the Soul of Capitalism as well as William Grider's The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to a Moral Economy. Natural Capitalism, Capitalism 3.0, Green to Gold, Cradle-to-Cradle, all book titles, are converging with Social Entrepreneurship and Social Business as well as unconventional Global Assemblages.

This book, the last that I read during a power outage lasting most of the day, really rocked me. Apart from the fact that the author has labored anonymously for three decades before being propelled into the public consciousness with his well-served Nobel Peace Prize (a prize that Prahalad should be considered for as well), everything in this book resonates with the path the 24-founders of Earth Intelligence Network have chosen.

The author's Nobel presentation, "Poverty is a Threat to Peace," is at the back of the book, and has since been validated by the UN High-Level Threat Panel in A More Secure World: Our Shared Responsibility--Report of the Secretary-General's High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change.

The author not only lent to the poor, he lent to beggars at no interest with no schedule, and proved conclusively that the poor and beggars are "credit worthy" by virtue of "being alive." He also pushed technology to rural areas.

By page xvii I have goosebumps and a glorious feeling that good stuff is happening faster and bigger than most realize.

The author notes early on that unfettered capitalism creates sccial problems rather than solving them. He suggests most compellingly that social business fills a gap left by government, foundations, and multilateral institutions.

While the book is missing a sense of shared information and a global Range of Gifts Table that anyone, from individual to foundation, can use to make precision contributions and interventions, it is very easy to see how this book and Yochai Benkler's book, The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom as well as How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas, Updated Edition and all come together with Prahalad's vision and my own of public intelligence in the public interest.

The author recognizes, as Alvin Toffler and others have pointed out, that all of our institutions are failing. I recommend books I have listed and reviewed on how complex societies collapse. I would venture to say that the US Government, with 27 secessionist movements, is collapsing from a mix of political and economic corruption compounded by cultural arrogance, but most importantly, because the government is stuck in the top down elite driven secret information Weberian model, and the government has failed to empower all local communities and all individuals with bottom up resilient adaptable information sharing capabilities.

The bookm draws a stark contrast between the World Bank which measures loans given out, and the Grameen Bank, which measures outcomes at multiple levels including kids staying in school.

As I read about a social business, I envision every village as its own business.

The author addresses and dismisses Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as insufficient. He calls for proactive collaborative engagement with potential customers in the five billion poor, and I am instantly reminded of the Business Week cover story of 20 June 2005, on the power of mass volunteer collaboration.

The author focuses on women, mothers, and their children. This tallies with Michael O'Hanlon and Ralph Peters, both of whom regard the education of women as the single best investment bar none.

The author took several steps beyond his pioneering micros-cash loans. He created social networks of those being helped, and he froze payments or interst and did whatever necessary to get defaulters back on track without penalty. This guy is the Mother Teresa of micro-economics!

Today self-help groups of around 20 can apply to the National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development for group loans.

His integrity is without peer. Interest over the life of the loan would never exceed the loan itself.

He prefers social business to charity because charity encourages corruption (in my own experience, 50% of every AID or contractor dollar goes toward corruption or fraud).

He observes that social business does not have conventional metrics, but it provides meaning and opportunity, and I observe in my own note, it lowers the "true costs" of virtually everything it touches.

Featured in this book, the middle half, is the French company Danone, and the joint venture to create a yogurt for the poor children, ultimately being delivered in a bio-degradable cup that converts into fertilizer.

The last chapter is on information technology for the poor. I personally envision free cell phones for each village, then for each neighborhood, and finally for each household, monetizing the transactions and the real-time knowledge.

The author concludes that we need new social value metrics and even a Social Dow Jones Index. This is the opposite of what I have been thinking about ever since Paul Hawkins taught me about "true costs." Now that Scanback allows a person at the point of sale to photograph a bar code and send it to Amazon to get their price, the channel is open to send back water content (4000 liters in a designer shirt from Bangladesh cotton), fuel content, child labor hours, and tax avoidance status).

The last note is one I want to present to a Fortune 50 Assets Management firm. Danone is to be admired and respected for committing to a sccial business, and it found a solution that permitted it to engage without letting down its investors: it created a new fund explicitly advertised as 90% traditional and 10% social business, and it was over-subscribed instantly.

On page 25 are listed 25 distinct Gameen companies. On pages 58-59 are Sixteen Decisions that alone warrant the Nobel Peace Prize. What these sixteen decisions do for the beneficiaries of micro-cash loans is nothing less than a socially-inspired form of the Ten Commandments, focused on creating health people in a healthy family within a healthy community.

A few other exceptional books:
The leadership of civilization building: Administrative and civilization theory, symbolic dialogue, and citizen skills for the 21st century
How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas, Updated Edition
Society's Breakthrough!: Releasing Essential Wisdom and Virtue in All the People

I am increasingly uncomfortable with the fact that all the books I am reading and reviewing are in English. I have read a few in English stemming out of India and elsewhere, and I am beginning to feel a very deep vacuum that needs to be filled. I envision 100 million volunteers using Telelanguage.com to educate the poor one cell call at a time, but I now also see an urgent need to translate and make available non-fiction literature in other languages, easily retrievable in micro-text for micro-cash.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Social Business = Human Business, January 19, 2008
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What a wonderful and uplifting book. Personally, I hate what corporate america has become...bent on making all the money that they can and keeping it for themselves. Mr. Yunus tells of how the make all the money you can approach makes people one dimensional instead of what we really are, multi-dimensional. The number one measure of a business should not be how much money it makes, but how much it has benefited society.

Mr. Yunus does a good job at explaining exactly what he means by a Social Business and gives real life examples. He is realistic by understanding that money is what makes the economy go around, but has a better way of using all that money out there. Companies like Intel and the makers of Danon Yogart have recently dedicated some of their resources to being a Social Business. I recommend this book for everyone. I am developing my own online business and plan on running it in a Social Business way. Thank you Mr. Yunus.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An inspiring success story of a new "social" business model, November 11, 2008
I've just finished reading the book from Muhammad Yunus - the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize winner, and I cannot give it less than 5 stars. It is an inspiring book that can touch your heart and motivate you to fight against poverty. At the same time, it did not quite match my expectations in terms of content, so I'd like to make clear in this review what you should and should not expect from this great book.

First of all, Muhammad Yunus presents his vision of the social business. It is a powerful idea based on challenging the assumption of one-dimensional human beings that aim at maximizing profit. This concept lies at the core of established economic theories, and supports the current notion of the business that should maximize value for its shareholders. The social business is totally dedicated to solving social or environmental problems. It is different from charities or NGO's as it does not generate losses, and it's different from profit-maximizing businesses as it does not pay dividend.

Furthermore, the author gives an account of real social businesses that he has created. It starts with Grameen Bank, the microcredit organization providing banking services to the poor people from Bangladesh, including beggars. Grameen Bank is a huge success story, and its model has been reapplied in numerous countries. Another example is Grameen-Danone yoghurt factory that aims at improving the diet of poor Bangladeshi children. It's been recently opened as a joint venture between the Danone corporation and Grameen Bank, and it follows the social business model as described by Yunus.

Finally, the reader is confronted with a vision of the world where poverty can only be seen in museums. I would compare this part of the book to a manifesto that describes the building blocks of a new world where social business can flourish, the environmental problems are resolved by mutual consensus between nations, and the information and communication technologies help the developing nations to participate in and benefit from the globalized market.

It is important to note what you should not expect from this book. It definitely isn't an instruction, or a how-to guide for creating a social business. It isn't a science book either - instead of presenting sound models and theories, the author focuses on his vision and experience, and the book is an account of real-life stories and examples.

The value of Creating a World Without Poverty lies in the inspiration it provides, in fascinating real-life examples of the author's journey to eliminate poverty in his country. It may sometimes sound like a science-fiction vision, but the example of Grameen Bank shows that nothing described in this book is impossible. It's a must-read.
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Creating a World Without Poverty: Social Business and the Future of Capitalism
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