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Creation, Un-creation, Re-creation: A discursive commentary on Genesis 1-11 Paperback – February 17, 2011


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Editorial Reviews

Review

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'Blenkinsopp brings his vast learning to the much studiedchapters of Genesis 1-11. His particular interest and competence is to show themany ways in which these chapters are situated in a rich world of textsincluding antecedent Mesopotamian texts and belated Jewish and Christian texts.His focus, however, is on the question, "How did things go wrong?" He traces theway in which the narrative probes the deep reality of evil in God's goodcreation. Blenkinsopp sets a bountiful table from which his readers will beable to continue the hard, urgent work of theological interpretation. We stilllive in a world where "things have gone wrong." This book suggests theconnections between "then" and "now."' - Walter Brueggemann, Columbia Theological Seminary, USA.


(Walter Brueggemann)

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 'Blenkinsopp writes with great erudition and also with greatlucidity. He is distilling the insights gained from a lifetime in scholarship.This book will be useful as a supplementary textbook in Old Testament courses.'- John J. Collins, Holmes Professor of Old Testament, Yale Divinity School,USA.
(John J. Collins)

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

'This is an unusual commentary, written by one of the leadingbiblical scholars of our time, but with the light touch and freshness of anovelist. In something of a tour deforce he works meticulously through the text, dealing in exemplary fashion withall the traditional linguistic and historical critical questions raised bymodern scholarship, but always keeping an eye on the story-line. Everywhere the meaning is illuminated, gaps inthe narrative filled in and the reader's curiosity addressed, by the use of literary parallels, culled,with enviable ease, not only from other parts of the Bible and the ancient neareast, but also from rabbinic, patristic and mediaeval literature, and the worksof Homer, Hesiod, Plato, Shakespeare, Donne, Cowper, Nietzsche, Karl Barth andmany others. An enthralling Epilogue:Towards a biblical theology of creation traces the main themes of Genesis1-11 through Deutero-Isaiah, Paul and the Gospels, and concludes, not as the ChristianBible does with a new heaven and a new earth,but with the mysterious "dark side of creation" and in particular a referenceby Jesus to Noah's flood "in terms which are prosaic, chilling andpsychologically credible in the light of the many lesser catastrophes whichhave been the human lot since then" (Luke 17:26-7).' - John F. A. Sawyer,University of Perugia, Italy.


(John F.A. Sawyer)

'This stimulating commentary, based on a lifetime's study and reflection, makes a major contribution to unravelling the myriad problems of interpretation in Genesis 1-11. The author's great erudition ensures that scholars and students will learn much from it, whilst its clear presentation makes it accessible to the lay reader. This wide ranging volume is packed full of valuable theological insights and makes impressive use of other biblical, ancient Near Eastern, classical and later Jewish sources to illumine the text.' - John Day, Professor of Old Testament Studies, Oxford University
(John Day)

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

'Blenkinsopp brings his vast learning to the much studiedchapters of Genesis 1-11. His particular interest and competence is to show themany ways in which these chapters are situated in a rich world of textsincluding antecedent Mesopotamian texts and belated Jewish and Christian texts.His focus, however, is on the question, “How did things go wrong?” He traces theway in which the narrative probes the deep reality of evil in God’s goodcreation. Blenkinsopp sets a bountiful table from which his readers will beable to continue the hard, urgent work of theological interpretation. We stilllive in a world where “things have gone wrong.” This book suggests theconnections between “then” and “now.”’ - Walter Brueggemann, Columbia Theological Seminary, USA.


(Sanford Lakoff)

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 'Blenkinsopp writes with great erudition and also with greatlucidity. He is distilling the insights gained from a lifetime in scholarship.This book will be useful as a supplementary textbook in Old Testament courses.’- John J. Collins, Holmes Professor of Old Testament, Yale Divinity School,USA.
(Sanford Lakoff)

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

'This is an unusual commentary, written by one of the leadingbiblical scholars of our time, but with the light touch and freshness of anovelist.   In something of a tour deforce he works meticulously through the text, dealing in exemplary fashion withall the traditional linguistic and historical critical questions raised bymodern scholarship, but always keeping an eye on the story-line.  Everywhere the meaning is illuminated, gaps inthe narrative filled in and the reader’s curiosity addressed,  by the use of literary parallels, culled,with enviable ease, not only from other parts of the Bible and the ancient neareast, but also from rabbinic, patristic and mediaeval literature, and the worksof Homer, Hesiod, Plato, Shakespeare, Donne, Cowper, Nietzsche, Karl Barth andmany others.  An enthralling Epilogue:Towards a biblical theology of creation traces the main themes of Genesis1-11 through Deutero-Isaiah, Paul and the Gospels, and concludes, not as the ChristianBible does with a new heaven and a new earth, but with the mysterious “dark side of creation” and in particular a referenceby Jesus to Noah’s flood “in terms which are prosaic, chilling andpsychologically credible in the light of the many lesser catastrophes whichhave been the human lot since then”  (Luke 17:26-7).’ - John F. A. Sawyer,University of Perugia, Italy.


(Sanford Lakoff)

John Day, Professor of Old Testament Studies, Oxford University
(Sanford Lakoff)

About the Author

Joseph Blenkinsopp is Emeritus Professor of Biblical Studies at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA.

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