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Creek Country: The Creek Indians and Their World 2003rd Edition

6 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0807854952
ISBN-10: 0807854956
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Creek Country: The Creek Indians and Their World + The Road to Disappearance: A History of the Creek Indians (The Civilization of the American Indian Series)
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Paints a vivid portrait of Creek society and culture in the early nineteenth century. . . . Well-written, free from jargon, and accessible to readers who are not experts in the field. Consequently, Ethridge's examination of the Creek world will be of considerable value for anyone interested in Indian ethnohistory or the history of the American south." -- "Journal of Southern History"

Review

A fascinating perspective on cultural exchanges between southeastern Creeks and other Americans, emphasizing the ecological context in which the exchanges occurred.--Journal of American History

|An important and engaging scholarly monograph. . . . A welcome addition to a burgeoning body of work.--Mississippi Quarterly

|Ethridge forges an original approach to writing American Indian history. . . . Remarkable. Every library should own this book, if only for her fourteen minutely detailed maps of Creek towns.--NC Historical Review

|A wonderful tour of Alabama and Georgia at a special time in southeastern United States history. . . . This book will serve well as a text for courses dealing with southeastern Indian history in the historic period and should find a home in any classroom at the upper undergraduate level and beyond. . . . A pleasure to read and will appeal to the layperson as well as the professional historian. . . . An original study that fills a serious gap in the existing literature by providing a much-needed general survey and description of everyday life for one specific tribe. Creek Country rightly deserves a place on every bookshelf next to other Creek history favorites.--Alabama Review

|Melding together information and insights from several disciplines, Ethridge creates a rich picture of the world the Creeks, and others, had created by the end of the eighteenth century. . . . Ethridge adds another dimension to the increasingly rich picture being painted by ethnohistorians of the early American South.--Historian

|The creative use of an array of sources . . . makes this book a remarkable contribution.--American Historical Review

|Paints a vivid portrait of Creek society and culture in the early nineteenth century. . . . Well-written, free from jargon, and accessible to readers who are not experts in the field. Consequently, Ethridge's examination of the Creek world will be of considerable value for anyone interested in Indian ethnohistory or the history of the American south.--Journal of Southern History

|An expansive and wide-ranging portrait of Creek country emerges out of the careful accumulation of detail. . . . Ethridge has written a unique and impressive book.--Georgia Historical Quarterly

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 2003 edition (December 8, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807854956
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807854952
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 5.8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #284,004 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Dale R. Cozort on April 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
I was interested in this book mainly for the first couple of chapters, which cover the early development of the Creek Indians. Chapter Two is a very good brief summary of current thinking about how the Indian tribes of the US southeast developed in the years between first contact with Europeans and the time the frontier reached the major tribes. Some important conclusions:

"...the Indian polities most associated with the South--the Cherokees, the Creeks, the Choctaws, the Chickasaws, the Seminoles, and the Catawbas--did not exist prehistorically. Rather, they came into existence sometime in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries in response to the contact between the Old and New Worlds."

They developed from the debris of the old Mississippian chiefdoms destroyed by European diseases in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. "During this time the chiefdoms of the Mississippian Period suffered a crippling loss of life... The consequences of this population collapse are not hard to see in the archaeological record. Some populations declined sharply, and some areas were abandoned altogether. The people ceased building mounds and ceremonial centers, and the level of ritual and artistic production declined sharply. Also, the elaborate status goods seen in late prehistoric graves disappear from the archaeological record in later times, suggesting a leveling of social status. The people suffered an incalculable loss of knowledge and traditional practices."

Survivors eventually banded together to form "coalescent" societies--the historic tribes like the Creeks, Cherokees, etc. They took form as a fusion of traditional forms and an emerging European economic system.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Lehigh History Student VINE VOICE on April 15, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book provides an intimate an unique look into how the Creek Indians lived throughout the time of the new republic. It begins with the establishment of the US Indian agent and how life changed through acculturation, accommodation, and resistance. Trade patterns, gender roles, and political structure all changed with the redeployment of American citizens. Although much of the land was taken up by illegal means the creeks were still forced to contend with the way that new societies emerged. The primary source for the book is the letters and diary of Benjamin Hawkins who was the United States government representative and former north Carolina senator to take up the process of reforming the Creeks. Hawkins dictated a great deal of life and his notes are very through. Combined with enthonhistorical techniques the reader gets a very interesting view of Creek Society from the inside. Very easy to read and a great start to understanding how the Indians lived in the colonial world.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lawrence H. Head, Jr. on January 27, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This would be of interest to anyone having a general curiosity about the pre-Removal Creeks. My own interest was a more detailed understanding of the geographical setting for the Creek War of 1813-14--and it did not disappoint.
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