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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Incredibly Original Debut
'No one knows why some girls have the gift. There are theories, of course. That it's passed down genetically. Or that girls with an open mind can see the weave of life around them at all times. Even that it's a gift only given to the pure-hearted. But I know better. It's a curse.'

In this world, everything is comprised of threads which can be altered,...
Published on November 20, 2012 by Miss Bonnie

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26 of 31 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Crewel
"Crewel" is a book I was highly anticipating. From the minute I read the summary, I wanted to get my hands on it. A book that has a cool premise, a dystopian society, inventive world building, and a twist on the Greek Fates? Yes, please.

I gobbled up the first half, even though it was slow going at times. The worldbuilding and the weave captured my attention,...
Published on September 19, 2012 by Leeanna Chetsko


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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Incredibly Original Debut, November 20, 2012
This review is from: Crewel (Crewel World) (Hardcover)
'No one knows why some girls have the gift. There are theories, of course. That it's passed down genetically. Or that girls with an open mind can see the weave of life around them at all times. Even that it's a gift only given to the pure-hearted. But I know better. It's a curse.'

In this world, everything is comprised of threads which can be altered, manipulated, or completely removed. Behavior modification can be done for unruly children or if they're deemed a lost cause can be removed completely. If that is done then everything is reworked in order to change the complete structure of everyone's thoughts and memories so that the child that was removed is not even remembered, even by his own parents. Even the most base things that would normally be natural: food cultivation, upcoming thunderstorms, these are all managed by the Spinsters. Only managed though.

'Crewel work is an act of pure creation. Crewelers do more than weave the fabric of Arras. They can capture the materials to create the weave. Only they can see the weave of the raw materials. (...) The Spinsters wouldn't have any matter to weave if it weren't for her special gift.'

Because this world wouldn't exist without the Creweler.

'Day by day, I am remade, into someone else. I'm sixteen now, and I will be almost flawless forever. That thought helps me fall asleep at night, secure in my place here, but it also wakes me up trembling with nightmares.'

Their beauty routines and the description of how these women look reminded me of geisha's. The only difference with the women in Arras is the access to renewal patches which allow them to heal wounds rapidly but also help to preserve their youth. These patches worked so well that you're virtually unable to tell people's true age anymore. A very sci-fi and freaky touch.

Sure, there is a slight love-triangle in the book but I'm starting to realize that my main issue with them is that there is always the guy the protagonist should obviously be going for and one that she very clearly should not be (and he's usually a total prick). That wasn't the case with Crewel and it was a very plausible situation in which the love triangle derived from. I actually liked both guys, one more so than the other (Jost), but they were both still well likable and weren't total pricks. That calls for celebration I think.

I loved the twist that was thrown in at the end. Everything slowly begins to unravel (haha... pun intended) and Adelice finally realizes the enormity of the situation that she's been forced into. The twist succeeded in not only making the entire situation crazy and eye-popping but really added a layer of realism to this 'perfect world'.

While I had trouble grasping the concept (at first) I was still incredibly fascinated by the idea and everything ended up being explained sufficiently in my opinion. The attention to detail into every facet of this world was incredibly intricate and entirely original. I loved it. Crewel is a sci-fi world where everything can be altered with a 1984 type society where people are controlled to the nth degree. Highly recommended for dystopian fans.
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26 of 31 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Crewel, September 19, 2012
This review is from: Crewel (Crewel World) (Hardcover)
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"Crewel" is a book I was highly anticipating. From the minute I read the summary, I wanted to get my hands on it. A book that has a cool premise, a dystopian society, inventive world building, and a twist on the Greek Fates? Yes, please.

I gobbled up the first half, even though it was slow going at times. The worldbuilding and the weave captured my attention, and kept me going. But when I put the book down for a week, with only 40 or so pages to go until the end, I knew something was wrong.

As I said, the worldbuilding in "Crewel" is quite inventive. When I found out where Arras came from, I thought it was pretty neat. Yeah, I saw influences from other dystopian novels, including "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood and "The Giver" by Lois Lowry, but I enjoyed the way Gennifer Albin twisted everything together.

The descriptions of the weave -- the force Spinsters manipulate to keep everything perfectly in line in Arras -- are gorgeous to read, and the cover is evocative of that. I applaud the publisher for not going with the "pretty girl in a dress" trend for the cover, and doing something abstract yet fitting.

My problems with "Crewel" started with Adelice, the main character. Her parents trained her to be clumsy, so she would never be picked to be a Spinster. I never understood why being clumsy would translate to being unable to see and touch the weave. When she's taken, Adelice discovers that she has more talent than any other Spinster, because she can manipulate the weave without a loom. Yet she uses her incredible talent to create a safe space to make out with the first boy she meets.

Yep, there's a love triangle here. I'm sorry, but I am sick of love triangles, and didn't think this one fit the book. I can understand Adelice having feelings for Jost, because she's been segregated from the opposite sex for her whole life. And Jost *is* a great guy. But the romance with Erik is weak and unnecessary.

While most of the writing was beautiful to read, sometimes it confused me. There was more than one passage I had to read several times in order to figure out just what was going on and why it was important to the plot. The ending was a real problem for me; it was rushed, and I'm still not sure exactly what happened.

I had some other problems, but I also had a lot of things I liked about "Crewel." One of my favorite characters was actually Maela, Adelice's enemy, and I want to know more about her. In a world where women are controlled by men, Maela is power hungry and vicious. I also appreciated that Albin brought up same-sex relationships -- I definitely wondered about them in such a controlled society, and while I don't agree with how the Guild (Arras's rulers) handles them, I do think it's something readers will ponder.

Overall, I enjoyed "Crewel." I just wasn't blown away, like I'd hoped to be. I WILL read the next book, because I want to find out what else the author has in mind, but it's not going to be a grabby hands, GIVE IT TO ME NOW sequel.
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful!, October 27, 2012
This review is from: Crewel (Crewel World) (Hardcover)
Not only is the cover of Crewel beautiful and striking, but the story inside is as well. This is one of those wonderful YA books that as soon as your eyes hit the very first page you find it very difficult to put it down. In fact I didn't put it down and ended up falling asleep reading it and woke up to find my poor Kindle on the floor. Never fear, I keep a pillow on the floor beside my bed for times just like this.

Before I started reading I already knew what crewel is. Crewel is a form of embroidery, one I had tried when I was younger. It is not my favorite kind of needlework but it is never less a lovely one when completed. As far as I know and understand, crewel is not used when you are weaving on a loom. So I found it very interesting that while the name was used, the technique really wasn't.

From an early age Adelice's parents realized that she was special. That she has a gift for weaving. While many would have loved their daughters to have such a gift, Adelice's parents taught her to hide hers. During her testing she makes a mistake and reveals that she has the gift. That night they come for her and her parents try to get her away. Unfortunately they take her and kill her father. Now Adelice must try to figure out who to trust and do her best to stay alive in her new privileged and yet dangerous world.

Crewel is the first novel in a YA Dystopia/Matrix like series. While the story is fresh and creative there was one thing I didn't like, the proverbial love triangle. Crewel also left me with a lot of unanswered questions and a desire to read more in this wonderful series.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the Hardest Book Reviews I've Ever Written, October 16, 2012
This review is from: Crewel (Crewel World) (Hardcover)
Thank you to NetGalley and Macmillan for this eARC!

I honestly don't know how to write this review. I'm sitting here, staring at my screen, trying to figure out what words to put in the box. I cannot for the life of me understand how there are so many reasons I LOVE this book, yet so many things that bothered me. Let's try to puzzle this out together, shall we?

For one, the book was certainly slow to start. The first chapter seems to promise instant action, but it slowly dies off for a while until the plot gets a direction again. Personally, I thought that took a lot longer than it should have, but then I'm easily annoyed when things don't start to move instantly.

The main character of Adelice was also very conflicting for me. On the one hand, she's my kind of girl: snarky, witty and totally rebellious without care of the power of the people she's pissing off. She had some of-no wait, THE-best lines in the book. On the other hand, her character felt very stagnant. It seemed like she certainly SHOULD have grown throughout the book, but I didn't believe it.

The world building is what drew me to this book originally, and the originality factor was off the charts. I can't even fathom how Albin came up with this idea, but I LOVE it. LOVE IT LOVE IT. So it was frustrating that most of the information I learned about this world came in large infodumps that still left me feeling a tad bit confused. Or maybe that was because I started skimming because I wanted something to happen besides talking.

Some elements of the romance in the book-yes, of course there's romance, what did you THINK this is YA-that surprised me: 1) Love triangle. No, this isn't a spoiler, because it is SO OBVIOUS SO FAST that it's being set up. Especially if your love-triangle-o-meter is as fine tuned as mine. 2) A frank and very modern discussion of lesbian women. After spending time in the world it makes total sense, but it certainly came out of left field for me. Whether or not these two elements are connected is something I'll leave you to find out for yourselves.

All in all, I think the thing that bothered me most about this book is that it felt like a set-up book. Like Albin felt she had created this world so crazy and different that she had to spend an entire book explaining it with some beginnings of plot around it so that she could zoom into the next book without having to worry about all this backstory business. To be fair, after reading this I have absolute and total faith that she can and will ROCK Crewel #2. The second half/end of the book almost bumped this review up to four and half stars because I was so in love with a certain plot twist. And then so annoyed by another. BUT! I do believe that Crewel as it's own story suffered under the load of the world that Albin tried to put on it.

Still, Albin totally and completely achieved the ultimate goal, which is to get me interested in the next book. Though I had issues with Crewel, there is no doubt in my mind that I will be getting Crewel #2. Also, she got me to rate it four stars, which certainly isn't bad, and I'll still recommend it to people without a doubt. The problem is just that I'm not recommending it for the story within the 368 pages of the book itself-I'll recommend it for the story I believe it will become.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I wanted to throw this against the wall so many times., March 2, 2013
This review is from: Crewel (Crewel World) (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Gennifer Albin wrote a "the book", by which I mean, CREWEL is the kind of book that takes everything that's popular right now, mixes it up with a creative premise, and gets sent out into the world with an eye-catching cover. CREWEL features a dystopic society, a love triangle, a smart and brave protagonist with special abilities, and a first person present narrative. And if CREWEL becomes a hit, I won't be surprised. It's got all the elements.

I wanted to like CREWEL, and I tried to like it. I was so intrigued by the premise of women weaving time and matter to keep the world spinning, and I still am interested in the concept. By far, the premise is the most fascinating part of the book. Unfortunately, the nitty-gritty exploration into the nature of the world and the role of the Spinsters takes a backseat to Adelice's attempts to navigate her controlling society. Arras is a standard dystopic society: a council rigidly controls everything, all for the sake of peace. Rogue elements are erased or rewoven; people who cause trouble are "ripped" from existence or "remapped", their minds and behaviors remade into something more suitable. Marriages are arranged carefully and jobs assigned; there's a strict hierarchy and women are at the bottom, meant to look pretty and that's about it.

Of course, the protagonist, Adelice, is an independently-minded young woman who doesn't like being told what to do; she's usually ready with a quick retort or a "No". She's meant to be intelligent and bold, but I found her inability to hold her tongue, to constantly needle those in superior positions to her own, annoying. Her attempts at rebellion were usually more reckless than intelligently thought out. Very few of the other characters were interesting. The two love interests (what's a YA novel without a love triangle?) were both perfect and perfectly dull. The villains lack any sort of intriguing or redeeming qualities; they're just ambitious and hate Adelice. Unsurprisingly, Adelice has allies in the mentor-figures, who, unsurprisingly, are more discreet in their subversion of the system. Quite frankly, the only character who remotely interests me is Cormac, the man who believes in the system and does all that he can to ensure its survival, and I'm not sure that I'm supposed to like him. The "good" characters don't.

All of this could, perhaps, have been redeemed if the execution of the premise had lived up to its potential, but unfortunately, the premise of a world constructed by women's weaving never quite works. Albin offers a brief explanation for the existence of Arras and scattered throughout the novel are bits and pieces about the workings of Arras, and it's shaky. I was never sure where the line between created and natural fell in Arras. This is a world where it seems like everything could be controlled, and yet there are still the rare accident and pockets of rebellion. It seems like the people of Arras, despite births needing to be scheduled so the babies can be woven in properly, are free agents in a world where even the weather is manmade. Spinsters are involved in food production, yet there's mention of farms. Taken together, the brilliant idea for the world isn't fleshed out fully, and it just seems problematic. Additionally, CREWEL's society is one of the most misogynistic and patriarchal that I've ever read, and I never understood why a society that was so controlled couldn't have more gender equality. Lastly, some of the dialogue sounded modern, and it was jarring. I'm a firm believer that people in dystopias shouldn't talk like they're from the twenty-first century, unless the novel is set in the twenty-first century, and this one isn't. Also, the last chapter of CREWEL is messy, attempting to bring together so many threads before setting up a cliffhanger to lead into the next book. There's no resolution.

CREWEL will find its audience. I have no doubt. It just didn't work for me. If you're picky about worldbuilding and ask a lot of questions regarding the workings of fictitious worlds, don't be lured in by the fantastic premise. If you don't ask a lot of questions, though, CREWEL is probably a fun read for fans of YA dystopias.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A dystopian gem!, August 31, 2012
This review is from: Crewel (Crewel World) (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Adelice has a natural gift of spinning the threads of time. However, her parents have been teaching her for years to make mistakes and to make them look naturally. When Adelice is sixteen, as with all girls, she will take the test. If she passes, she will become a Spinster, weaving the threads of their world, with privileges, beauty, and notoriety not available to the common people and never see her family again. If she fails, she will get to become a worker, such as a secretary and be married off by the time she is eighteen. But Adelice makes a mistake on her test and shows a glimpse of her true gift.

When they come for her, she does what her parents tell her to. She hides in a tunnel, but her escape is futile. She is captured and some of her family killed. When she arrives, she is treated differently then the other girls. She has more privileg then they do, but she's always being watched. Her trainer hates her on site and will do anything within her power to be rid of Adelice. Although she is very forthright with her opinions, that get her into trouble quite often, Adelice eventually finds some friendship with her mentor, Enora, and a valet, the handsome Josten. Adelice doesn't understand why she is being treated differently - she imagines that all of them can weave the threads without a loom. But she's wrong.

The man with all of the power, Cormac, keeps a keen eye on Adelice, even when she begins her training with Loricel, the Creweler. It is the Creweler's job to gather up the raw materials and weave their world and to remove the bad threads, sometimes wiping out big chunks of their world and people. She holds many secrets and begins to share them with Adelice, who will eventually take her place. But Adelice just wants to be in Josten's arms and find her sister, who was not killed when she was taken. But will she be able to outmaneuver Cormac or will his power turn her into one of his loyal subjects?

Crewel is a dystopian gem; a unique and clever world that kept me riveted as I devoured the pages. Not only is the world-building captivating, but the characters are diverse and developed, having me either hating them or cheering for them. The politics was easy to follow, as well as some of the science, which I found to be refreshing. Although there is a cliffhanger, I was immensely satisfied with this book and am really anticipating the next one.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wish I could weave book two into my hands!, September 6, 2012
This review is from: Crewel (Crewel World) (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I'd heard a lot of good talk about this book, so I was fairly eager to get my hands on it already when this came up in Amazon Vine. Readers, you will want to get your hands on this book just as much. I absolutely loved this book.

I don't know where to begin with what I loved about this book. I think one of the things that stuck out the most was how complicated the characters sometimes are. Very few of the characters are absolutely good or absolutely bad and I think Maela might be one of my favorites of the book. The premise of the book was also pretty appealing. The use of looms to weave reality or to influence things has been something that has stuck with me ever since I heard about the old video game Loom. There's a lot to play with as far as the loom and weaving metaphors go, so Albin has a lot of room to play around in.

There are a lot of familiar themes here. You have your stereotypical love triangle and Adelice is also your typical YA heroine. This doesn't really detract from the book as a whole and the familiarity of all of this helps to ground the rest of the book since there's a lot that goes on in this first entry. For this reason I'd say that this book won't be the "lounge around and eat potato chips" type of read. It's addicting and a fast read, so I don't think that will really put a lot of people off.

If you're a fan of Cate Tiernan's work, you'll probably like this one. It's not exactly the same genre but it seems to have that same addicting quality that her books have. I'm already yearning for the next book in the series and I hate the thought that it'll probably be at least a good year before I have the chance to get my hands on a review copy. This is absolutely worth the time to check out.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Artists Steal, September 2, 2012
This review is from: Crewel (Crewel World) (Hardcover)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Her whole life Adelice's parents have tried to teach her fingers to be clumsy, unwieldy, and incompetent, to deny the weaving skill that comes as naturally to her as breathing. But it's hard to hide what you inherently are and then the Guild came for her.

Arras is a world created in time and space, woven by the Spinsters. Spinsters are the people who keep Arras running. Sitting behind large looms, using patterns the Coventry provides, they weave in everything from food, to weather, to shelter. They patch the threads of the world, they repair them, and they rip them. In Arras it's considered worthwhile to pass the mandatory testing and be chosen as a Spinster. Only women can be Spinsters (it's easier to control women) and once chosen they are treated to a Hollywood lifestyle. They are afforded the best living quarters, best meals, best cosmetics, and best wardrobe Arras has to offer. But all is not glitter and gold in the Coventry, for even the Coventry and the Spinsters housed in it are not free of the male dominated grasp of the Guild. Under the guise of keeping peace, the Guild controls all of Arras...right down to the food rations. They have created a society wherein men are placed above women, segregation is employed, and thoughts and actions monitored. Those deemed to be a threat are ripped, by Spinsters, from the fabric of Arras. However, Arras cannot continue to exist without a chief Crewler and the current one, Loricel is dying. The Spinsters may have the ability to weave patterns into Arras, but only the Crewler can create and manipulate. Adelice's talent is so strong that she requires no loom; she can see the threads which make up Arras and she can simply reach her hands in and manipulate them. Now that the Guild has claimed her they believe their problem solved. But the seeds of dissent were sown early into her mind and the Guild has done nothing to quiet her fears. Adelice isn't about to play nice.

Once I started reading I got a taste of how clever Albin is. With "Crewel" she has managed to take elements from some of the most revered and popular dystopic novels ever written and has reinvented them, methodically blending them with her own original designs. In "Crewel" I see elements of "The Giver", "Hunger Games", and Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy. While these elements are there, they are pulled into a completely original world; a world in which even the title of Spinster subverts our traditional notions. While reading I became infatuated with Arras, a world both like and unlike our own. Arras is a patriarchal society wherein the female is considered to be a second class citizen (sound familiar). Yet it is the females who *really* hold all the power since they are the only ones who can weave and the continuation of Arras relies upon the abilities of the Spinsters. Of course this implies females are easily controlled and easily appeased, and for the most part they are with some dangerous exceptions. The pace of the novel is absolutely flawless and the biting, witty, sarcastic commentary impeccably timed. Albin's characters are strongly sketched as is her world, with sharp details and careful coloring. The general disdain for men that permeated the novel was riotously entertaining. Adelice is one of the stronger female leads I've seen in YA lit and her strengths aren't merely confined to her skill of weaving. I don't think you could ask for a better debut novel. "Crewel" hasn't even hit the shelves yet and I'm already salivating for a sequel.
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14 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best Dystopians I've Read! A Definite Must Read!, October 19, 2012
By 
Stephanie Ward (Cochranton, PA United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Crewel (Crewel World) (Hardcover)
'Crewel' is the first book in an enthralling new dystopian series. It centers around the world of Spinsters - those with the gift to manipulate the threads of time and matter. Most girls hope to be chosen for this fate, but Adelice wants to be dismissed. In spite of her best efforts, Adelice is chosen to become a Spinster and is taken away to the Coventry. Her life will never be the same and things on the inside are even worse than she thought.

This novel is one of the most inventive and enchanting ones I've read. The world and it's workings are so detailed and intricate that I immediately fell under their spell. The politics, the lives of the Spinsters, the setting of Arras and the Coventry - not to mention the storyline of weaving the threads of time - all come together to create a thrilling page turner. The characters are flawed and endearing - especially the heroine Adelice, who has sarcasm and attitude to spare. I identified with her and was definitely rooting her on throughout the entire book. There is romance in the story, which made it all the more intriguing. It gives the plot more depth and the scenes are romantic but not cheesy (which I like). There are lots of twists in the story and you never quite know what to expect next. I liked the feeling that there is always something new to discover; another layer of the story to figure out. It was a bit hard to wrap my mind around the whole time weaving concept as well as figuring out the world of Arras and everyone's place inside it; but once I did, I was completely immersed in the setting and the plot. I really loved this book and the only thing I'm upset about is that I have to wait for what feels like forever for the next book to come out. I highly recommend this novel for fans of science fiction and dystopian fiction.

Disclosure: I received a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Flat cardboard characters and confusing plot, June 29, 2013
This review is from: Crewel (Crewel World) (Hardcover)
Crewel takes place in a futuristic society where people and events are woven with strands of time by Spinsters. Spinsters are generally girls chosen by their talent at weaving by the Guild in Arras. These girls are taken from their homes and families and then reside within the Guild where they practice weaving time with matter. Everything in Arras is controlled by the Guild through the spinsters such as harvesting food, childbirth, and even when and how someone dies.

Adelice is unique in Arras society in that she is able to weave the strands of time without a loom. From when, as a child, she first discovers this ability, Adelice's parents work fervently to teach her how to cover it up so that she is not selected by the Guild who they do not trust. When, at her testing, she is among those chosen to be come a spinster, and is singled out among the others at the Guild, Adelice finds herself not knowing who she can trust.

The audio was read by Amanda Dolan who does a fairly good job narrating this rather tedious story. At times I thought she may have went a little overboard making some of the characters sound patronizing and condescending, but for the most part I enjoyed her narration.

While Crewel certainly has an original storyline even for a dystopian, there was far too much of the society that simply pushed the bounds of believability too far for me. For example, if Adelice and the other spinsters were controlled by this sinister Guild, why didn't they just weave things differently? It was made very clear in the story that the spinsters were the only ones powerful enough to control their reality, I don't understand the power this Guild had over the spinsters. Also, Adelice experiences some traumatic events very early on in the story, but she seems to just kind of accept them without much emotional impact and goes about her business. She put much more thought and energy into the awkwardly contrived love triangle than she did into events that would have devastated the average teen. But then Adelice is also exceptional in EVERY way, which was yet another issue I had with the book.

For the most part, I enjoyed the writing style. I didn't have to struggle through the audio and finished fairly quickly for a 10 hour audio. But for me, the characters were flat and lacked authenticity and the world building was confusing and left more questions than answers. The sudden ending left me feeling a bit perplexed. It just sort of cut off without any resolution at all. It wasn't so much a cliffhanger as it simply felt unfinished.
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Crewel (Crewel World)
Crewel (Crewel World) by Gennifer Albin (Hardcover - October 16, 2012)
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