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Crime Over Time: Temporal Perspectives on Crime and Punishment in Australia Hardcover – November 1, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-1443824170 ISBN-10: 1443824178

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Editorial Reviews

Review

'Here is a volume that dips deeply into the hidden pockets of a nation that was actually founded upon the interstices of crime and punishment. Every chapter makes an arresting, original contribution, weaving together a compelling tale of frontier relations, racial conflict, moral panics, psychiatric scandals, stolen children and community policing in a composite account that travels all the way from convicts and bushrangers to terrorism and cyber-crime. Here is both a broadly ranging work of outstanding scholarship and a cracking good read.' --Professor Raymond Evans, Centre for Public Culture and Ideas, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia

'From bushrangers to cyber criminals, from the colonial period to contemporary time, this fine collection of essays traverses largely neglected yet important issues associated with crime and punishment in Australian society. The product of a rich collaboration between scholars of history and criminology it affords a colourful and unique portrayal of numbers of criminogenic factors which have influenced criminal justice law and policy since 1778. It is a book which should be read with as much interest and gratification by devotees of Underbelly, students of criminology or law makers bent upon learning from past experience how best to respond to the crime problems of the future.' --Professor Duncan Chappell, Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, University of Sydney, Australia

'From bushrangers to cyber criminals, from the colonial period to contemporary time, this fine collection of essays traverses largely neglected yet important issues associated with crime and punishment in Australian society. The product of a rich collaboration between scholars of history and criminology it affords a colourful and unique portrayal of numbers of criminogenic factors which have influenced criminal justice law and policy since 1778. It is a book which should be read with as much interest and gratification by devotees of Underbelly, students of criminology or law makers bent upon learning from past experience how best to respond to the crime problems of the future.' --Professor Duncan Chappell, Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, University of Sydney, Australia

About the Author

Robyn Lincoln is Assistant Professor in Criminology at Bond University, Queensland, Australia. She is co-author of Jean Lee: The Last Woman Hanged in Australia, Justice in the Deep North and Crime on my Mind. In addition to university teaching and research, Robyn has experience in academic publishing as Senior Editor at Aboriginal Studies Press and Managing Editor of several scholarly journals. Her research centres on issues of Indigenous crime and justice and the new field of forensic criminology, including miscarriages of justice and the naming and shaming of youth involved in criminal proceedings. Shirleene Robinson is Assistant Professor of History at Bond University, Queensland, Australia. She is the author of Something like Slavery? Queensland s Aboriginal Child Workers, 1842 1945, the co-author of Speaking Out: Stopping Homophobic and Transphobic Abuse in Queensland and the editor of Homophobia: An Australian History. She has previously taught at the University of Queensland, where she gained her PhD, and the University of Wales (Lampeter). Her research interests include histories of crime and punishment, race and gender, and sexuality. She is currently working on a project on HIV/AIDS and community formation in Australia s past.

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