Crimson Cult PG

Amazon Instant Video

(6) IMDb 5.4/10

While searching for his brother, a young man arrives at Greymarsh Lodge in time for the annual ceremony of "burning" the black witch of Greymarsh who lived 300 years earlier. In HD.

Starring:
Boris Karloff, Christopher Lee
Runtime:
1 hour, 28 minutes

Crimson Cult

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on April 4, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
After the disappearance of his brother, antique dealer Robert Manning (Mark Eden) travels to the remote country manor of Greymarsh where he was last seen. There he stays with the charming J. D. Morley(Christopher Lee) and his beautiful neice, Eve (Virginia Wetherell). However, the Morley family is descended from Lavinia Morley (Barbara Steele in green makeup), the legendary Black Witch of Greymarsh. As Robert continues to investigate the disappearance of his brother, he is beset by horrible dreams about black masses and ritual sacrifices and ends up seeking the wheelchair bound Professor John Marshe (Boris Karloff), an expert on the occult, for help.
This 1968 film from Vernon Sewell, a rather uninspiring director who made the 1952 film "Ghost Ship," suffers because the story is not worthy of a film that has two of the biggest names in horror film history with Karloff and Lee (and a famous face in Steele). The two take turns stealing scenes, with Lee getting the better of the deal because for once he gets to display some charm as he goes his evil way. The story is loosely adapted from the H.P. Lovecraft short story "The Dreams in the Witch House," which means it is a good idea gone horrible astray .... There are plenty of ....laughs (Robert makes a comment about expecting Boris Karloff to pop up) and a few moments of passing erotic interest, but if it were not for Karloff's explanation at the end of the film we would not really have a good idea of what was going on.
"The Crimson Cult," released in England as "Curse of the Crimson Altar," is a bad movie whose badness works in its favor in terms of enjoying it on a level unintended by its creators. The reliance on psychedelic symbolism rather than substantive storytelling ultimately dooms the production. The presence of Karloff and Lee saves it from descending too far, and you do have Steele and Wetherell (who achieved some notoriety for her appearance in "A Clockwork Orange").
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Deborah MacGillivray HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 15, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
Why is it H.P. Lovecraft always gets the short shift in film? Another Lovecraft tale brought to screen that likely would make the old master cringe and it's a shame since it has so much going for it. Performances of Christopher Lee, Boris Karloff and Barbara Steele - three horror legends - nice local shooting, but it basically falls sort of the mark with a apathetic script.
The film opens with a green skin (never explained!!) witch Lavinia Morley (Barbara Steele) taking to the oath to the devil from a blond headed man. Cut to an antique shop, where we learn the man was Peter Manning. Out on a antique hunt for items for the shop, he has vanished leaving a mysterious note to his brother Robert Manning (Mark Eden). Manning sets out to trace his brother, and the path leads to Greymarsh Manor owned by J.D. Morley (Lee). Descendant of Lavinia who has been dead for long long time.
Morley invites Manning to stay with him and his niece Eve (Virginia Wetherell), since they are no hotel rooms because they are holding a local festival about the burning of Lavinia Morley. Morely claims Peter was never at the Manor, but Robert soon learns he was and a lurking butler (Michael Gough). Boris Karloff plays Prof. John Marshe the local expert of witchcraft.
Manning begins to have strange dreams of his brother and the green witch. Steele looks impressing in her costume, but really has little to do. As the dreams grow, his feeling that Peter is dead and he begins to have doubts about Karloff and Lee. He wakes up wandering the countryside and stabbed. A Bobby popup in the middle of the night, stopping him from wandering into the lake.
Some hokey scenes of animal faced jury and bikini clad (wish they had spared me or gotten someone with a descent bod!!) antler bearing man. Sounds like that tossed in everything but the kitchen sick with no real thought of WHY?
Still nice fun for Lee, Karloff and Steele fans. But a shame. It's tries very hard, but falls flat.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jose Lopez on August 4, 2011
Format: VHS Tape
Curse of the Crimson Altar(The Crimson Cult On Netflix Instant stream even though the other name shows up when you press play.)Christopher Lee is a superb actor as is of course Boris Karloff as you can see by their roles in this film and the surprise ending,however the film is just a bunch of hippie AND writer H.P.(can't stand his stuff) Lovecraft mumbojumbo occult/pagan matters,there were so many of these films made in the 60's and 70's,this film is a bunch of fruitcakes in s&m garb and some bizarre witch along with a plot that does not make sense.Lee/Karloff are the only reason to watch.
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