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Cripple Creek Days Paperback – September 1, 1984


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 286 pages
  • Publisher: Bison Books (September 1, 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803279124
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803279124
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #349,512 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"One of the most fascinating accounts of a gold rush town."—Chicago Sunday Tribune
(Chicago Sunday Tribune)

"More entertaining by far than the run of fictional westerns, more authentic, of course, and a great deal more moving."—W. M. Teller, Saturday Review
(W. M. Teller Saturday Review)

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Grandparents came from Ireland to work in the mines and settle in Victor.
arvel r. ricketts
The author, Mabel Barbee Lee, places her readers in Cripple Creek in what was most certainly its finest hour.
RFRF
This fine lady's writings reflected the prudish (and most admirable) traits of good ladies of the time.
Yakatony

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
For people who love to read about history they will especially enjoy this book. Rather than being a boring historical account of events that occurred during the Cripple Creek gold rush this book is a first hand experience of a young girl who actually grew up in Cripple Creek during the gold rush. It is filled with lots of tid-bits about what life was actually like back then - food they ate, clothes they wore ect. as opposed to a bunch of historical facts. A good read if you're interested in what life was like in Cripple Creek.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 13, 1998
Format: Paperback
I read this book and couldn't put it down. The author tells from her own life story what it was like to live during the late 1800's and early 1900's during the gold rush times in the Pikes Peak region of Colorado. I've given this book to many people as a present after they've visited the region and everyone has loved the story!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 22, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a brilliant novel which engages the reader fully. The plot twists and turns as if this were a work of fiction rather than a biography. The characters are vivid, unique and unforgettable ... and they were real people. Ms. Barbee Lee was a keen observer and her descriptions are fascinating. Most of all, I liked how she tells us interesting gossip about some of the powerful people involved in the Cripple Creek gold rush and then, explains how things turned out and why. Some of these explanations needed enough time to pass in order to be told. While reading this page-turner, I felt like I was watching the events unfold through a window. I have recommended it to friends just because it is a really good book. The fact that it is true and will give the reader more insight into the past and into Colorado's mining history is just a bonus.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 25, 1998
Format: Paperback
This well written book gives you a good feel for what it was like living in Cripple Creek around the turn of the century. The stories are entertaining, and its history educates. A wonderful and unique book, with lots of enjoyable detail.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "dgl@pipeline.com" on August 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book captivates a sense of innocence and honesty that is palpable on each page. Mable Lee Barby wrote the book I always wanted to read about the district that as a child I wandered and wondered endlessly. Mable is buried between "Jonce" and "Kate" overlooking the town. Cripple Creek has mostly disappeared from what I knew. There are no more "old timers" sitting on chairs in front of screen doors of dusty old shops holding so many individual memories of the characters that made Cripple Creek such an special place. The wheel house is almost gone from the surrounding hills but there is a spiritual core of a history that will never die.
Frank Waters did a wonderful job with his two books and there have been others but when I see Bennett St. or even pass the front steps of the old stone building of Colorado College I think of Mable Lee Barbee. In this book she left a record of her and others lives that will never be equaled. There is a sweet fragrance!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Brian D. Webber on October 10, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What I Liked: The author's love of her adopted hometown comes through very well. Her descriptions of people and places are vivid enough that one can almost see them when they close their eyes while reading, between passages. I also liked how a lot of clichés and stereotypes about the Colorado Gold Rush era are avoided. Yes, some characters do talk and act the way we've seen them act in Western films since many actually did, but this book doesn't act as though they made up the entirety of the region. We meet people in this book who are articulate, people who are more cynical and jaded than "frontiersman" like, who are religious, but don't proselytize. Another aspect of this book is the period correct dialogue. The languages and attitudes of the people of the day isn't toned down or made politically correct to avoid offending anyone. Yes, some of the people in the story, even the likeable ones, use words and phrases we of 21st century Colorado recognize as racist and/or stereotypical, but that is simply how people talked in that time. Overall, reading this book reminds me in some ways of how I enjoyed the film Little Big Man, another period piece set in roughly in the same timeframe.

What I Didn't Like: The author doesn't always do a good job of conveying time in the book. More than once, I actually got lost and couldn't figure out what year an event was occurring in, or how old she was. Transitions aren't always smooth, such as when her brother goes from newborn to whiny toddler in a matter of a few pages. It can be jarring, but is not uncommon for first time authors. Granted, I don't actually know if this was Mabel Barbee Lee's first book, but if it was, it shows.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Martin E. Williams on July 6, 2008
Format: Paperback
A poigniant first-person memoire of life in the mining camps at the turn of the 20th Century. Excellent prose. Very clear, descriptive, and engrossing writing. The theme is a surprising brush with the notable politically, socially, and historically famous folks in a most unexpected place: an isolated, mostly poverty ridden mining camp at very high elevation in one of the richest gold mining areas. The author's father played an important role in the exploration and development of the gold and silver discoveries there. Chronicles her childhood and flowering as a woman of distinction who knew tradgedy and trauma, yet grew into a very wholesome adult.
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