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Crisis On Infinite Earths Paperback – January 1, 2001


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Product Details

  • Series: Crisis on Infinite Earths
  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; Gph Rep edition (January 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563897504
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563897504
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 6.6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (139 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,153 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Marv Wolfman is the former Editor-In-Chief of Marvel Comics. He is a longtime comic writer who had long runs on Tomb of Dracula for Marvel, which is where Blade the Vampire Hunter made his first appearance and New Teen Titans for DC Comics. Blade was later adapted to film form with Wesley Snipes in the starring role. Wrote the landmark DC Comic series Crisis on Infinite Earths. Created the character 'Bullseye' for Daredevil comics. Created the current iteration of Robin (Robin III/Tim Drake) for DC comics. The character has remained popular for nearly twenty years and has its own self-titled long-running series

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Customer Reviews

This kind of thing just ends up jumbling up what is a pretty convoluted story line to begin with.
I. Raudenbush
For these reasons alone, any DC Comics fan has to read the brilliant Crisis on Infinite Earths by Marv Wolfan and George Perez.
TheIntruder
And if you are reading it just to see heroes get killed off, very little of that happens either, so don't believe the hype!
The Cool Guy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

88 of 92 people found the following review helpful By Ted Blanton on September 18, 2004
Format: Paperback
How is it possible to review this graphic novel objectively? People seem to either love it or hate it. And both with good reason. It was a story 50 years in the making that still has major ramifications, both positive and negative, for comics today.

Longtime comicbook readers feel that they need "continuity" in the stories they read. Continuity is the idea that a fictional universe, such as the one in which DC's superhero comics take place, operates with a certain logic and is internally consistent. By 1961, however, DC was having trouble with continuity. How could they explain that, twenty years ago, Batman and Robin were fighting Nazis and hanging out with FDR, while in the present they were fighting Commies and hanging out with JFK ... but Robin was still only a teenager???

Since DC's WW2 stories were too fondly remembered to just be ignored, the editors decided that they all took place in an alternate universe, dubbed Earth-2. The present-day DC heroes lived on Earth-1 and were a good deal younger than their Earth-2 counterparts, not having debuted until after WW2. Every year Earth-1's Justice League teamed up with Earth-2's Justice Society, whose Robin was an adult, whose Superman had grey hair, etc., etc.

By the early 1980s, DC decided that the multiplicity of Earths-- of Supermen, Batmen, and Wonder Women--was hurting the company's ability to attract new readers. The DC universes needed to be simplified into a single universe and duplicate characters eliminated. This move has remained controversial ever since, but I maintain that it was the right thing to do, because I only became a DC reader in the aftermath of CRISIS.
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94 of 103 people found the following review helpful By TheIntruder on November 29, 2002
Format: Paperback
You can't talk about the DC Universe with anyone without referring to post-Crisis and pre-Crisis events.For these reasons alone, any DC Comics fan has to read the brilliant Crisis on Infinite Earths by Marv Wolfan and George Perez. It is also unique in that it chronicles the deaths of several DC characters, most of whome have since remained dead. These include the deaths of Kara (the original Supergirl) and Barry Allen (the silver age Flash, who was the main Flash character for almost 30 years). These are some of the best deaths ever written in comics, especially the Flash's horific death against the story's antagonist the Anti-Monitor.
The Crisis is a massive, ambitious project which DC undertook in 1985 to simplify the DC Multiverse and turn it into a universe. The multiverse was too confusing with different versions of the same characters living in different parralel universes. The end result wasa single coherent universe in which different universes were merged into one. So it is obviously a very important story.
But that's not all because it also holds its own as a story. The Monitor is in a mission to save the positive universe from being devoured by the negative universe, ruled by the Anti-monitor. To do this, he gathers key heroes and villains from both the positive nad negative unverses to stop this.
The end result, as the advertisements of the time said, world lived, world died, but the unverse was never hte same again.
Like, say Lord of the Rings, Crisis has a main antagonist but does not seem to have a main character. In the beginning it seems that perhaps the Monitor and his helper the Harbinger are the main characters but at some points the focus shifts on other characters.
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53 of 57 people found the following review helpful By EDR on March 2, 2006
Format: Hardcover
...then this book is worth it. I can't say anything about this story that hasn't already been said so I'll go straight to the book itself. This is a HUGE deluxe version of The Crisis on Infinite Earth's story. George Perez's artwork shine's in this enlarged format his already beautiful work is now enhanced. The companion book list all of the tie-in and crossover's that lead up too and took place during the Crisis. There is even mention's of the supposed sequel's(crisis in heaven, zero hour etc...)that were inspired by the story. The only way this could have been better is if they would have included the history of the DC universe mini series that was the direct follow up to the Crisis. Hell they even mention Infinite Crisis(DC's current running true sequel to this story)in the appendix book. A list of ALL the alternate earth's are included. Bottom line is if you like this story enough shell out the money to buy this if you are a newbie try the softcover. hope this help's
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Carl R. Knecht on November 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
There was a bit of chaos caused by Flash #123, way back in 1961. The events in that book -- with Jay Garrick and Barry Allen meeting each other for the first time -- spawned what would become known as the DC Multiverse. Some 24 years later, the multiverse and collected histories of the characters within the multiverse got very muddled and confusing. Which Superman was that? And does he know about the events happening on Earth-2?

From the business side of the comics industry, people were having a hard time joining in on comics, because of this confusion, along with almost 50 years of history that may be needed to understand some of the storylines. Because of all this, DC decided to do something. And with the 50 year anniversary looming in 1985, they decided to do something BIG.

This is the series that changed everything, and continues to impact the DC Universe twenty years later with Infinite Crisis. For that reason alone, don't expect to just casually pick this up and enjoy it like "Formerly Known as the Justice League". This is a book that is very involving, encompasing and changing some 50 years of history, and requires the reader's attention to be adequately enjoyed. But for those that want to see how a massive fictional history can be effectively rebooted, this is required reading. After all, characters have been referred to as pre-Crisis and post-Crisis for a reason.
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