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Crisis On Multiple Earths TP Vol 04 Paperback – May 1, 2006


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Paperback, May 1, 2006
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (May 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401209572
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401209575
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 6.9 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,119,228 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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23 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Babytoxie on May 31, 2006
Containing stories written by Cary Bates & Elliot S. Maggin, E. Nelson Bridwell, and Martin Pasko & Paul Levitz, with art by the great Dick Dillin & Frank McLaughlin, CRISIS ON MULTIPLE EARTHS VOLUME 4 continues the interdimensional team-ups that were a staple of DC Comics up to the time of the Crisis on Infinite Earths. This volume collects Justice League of America #123- 124, 135-137, and 147-148. These stories feature 3-way team ups, with the JLA of Earth-1 and JSA of Earth-2 meeting the heroes of Earth-S (Captain Marvel, Bulletman and Bulletgirl, Ibis, Spy Smasher, and Mr. Scarlet and Pinky), the Legion of Super Heroes, and even the aforementioned writers Bates and Maggin (of Earth-Prime, of course)! A beautiful cover by series regular Alex Ross ties the stories together and lets you know exactly what guests to expect.

Okay, now the bad part... I'll admit it: while I enjoyed reading the various multiple Earths crossovers of the `60s and `70s when I was a kiddo, it was mostly because I had no knowledge of DC's golden age characters and was fascinated with these odd-looking doppelgangers of my beloved JLA. Hawkman with a hood? Flash with a dinner plate on his head? Superman with gray hair? What the heck??? I didn't pay much attention to the stories back then, and after reading up through the 4th volume of CRISIS ON MULTIPLE EARTHS, plus one volume of THE TEAM-UPS, I can say that while these stories certainly do have nostalgic value, the majority lack a coherent storyline. In fact, volume 4 really serves as a testament to the sorry state of DC's writing stable in the late `60s and early `70s.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Posner on March 1, 2013
When I was a child in the 70s, I had two of the three issues of the King Kull story (the middle one in this collection) and was happy to get this book so I could read the whole story as a semi-coherent whole -- or at least, as intended. It brings in a lot of minor and forgettable characters from the same milieu as the Marvel Family -- such as Bulletman and Bulletgirl, Mr. Scarlet and Pinky, etc, as well as a number of lesser-used villains. In so doing, it takes on the same incoherence as does the Crisis on Infinite Earths series without the crossovers. There's a sense that you missed reading something cool that happened between panels.

Don't suppose that Superman and Captain Marvel fight. They don't. The original cover and the TPB cover are technically accurate, that they rush at each other as if to fight, but in the 70s, fights between heroes were discouraged. Maybe it was a comics-code thing, along the lines of that good guys would always find a way not to fight each other.

The other stories than this one are not particularly strong, but they are readable. The art is at a high standard for the era.

This is an okay book if you want to read large crossovers with lots of heroes and villains. Even overall lame stories have good moments, so if you think you will like it, you will.
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By Robert C Sales on January 15, 2014
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Needed it for my collection. Hard to find these comics anymore, and if you do find them. The price would be outragious!
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My father got me started on comics at a young age so my first encounter with the Crisis crossovers were the Denny O'Neil penned classics in one of the earlier volumes in this series, but the stories in this edition were the crossovers I read as I approached my teens. For whatever reason, I remember enjoying them greatly back in the day, but rereading them for the first time in many years in this collected volume, I can see clearly the effects nostalgia has on the memory. Instead of the amazing epics I remembered, I was surprised to find that these were easily some of the weakest stories of the Crisis canon.

All three stories have bits that were enjoyable and, in theory, could have been the epics they so clearly wanted to be (the first one has the JLA and JSA meeting their comic creators of DC Comics in a crossover with Earth Prime, believed at one point to be the earth we comic book readers lived on, the second includes a trip to Earth S and a meeting with Shazam and the Golden Age heroes published by Fawcett Comics, and the third offers a meeting with the Legion of Super-Heroes and one of their most powerful enemies, Mordru, and throws in the JLA's demonic foes, Abnegezar; Rath and Ghast for good measure). Unfortunately, the writing is, at best, disjointed and the tasks our heroes undertake often have no logical underpinnings and seem far too silly even for its era. At the same time, there is an air of seriousness to these adventures that does not allow the reader to simply give in to the fun aspects of these stories the way the earlier epics cooked up by Gardner Fox and Mike Sekowski did.

The worst of the lot is the first, which is a shame. I have a fond place in my heart for the Flash stories where the first Earth Prime cross-overs took place.
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