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Comment: Very Good used copy: Some light wear to cover, spine and page edges. Very minimal writing or notations in margins. Text is clean and legible. Possible clean ex-library copy with their stickers and or stamps.
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Crome Yellow Paperback – November 17, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 132 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (November 17, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1466285397
  • ISBN-13: 978-1466285392
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 0.3 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,149,020 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Although Blackstone is to be commended for rediscovering many older literary classics, these two early Huxley novels might better have been left to rest in peace. Crome Yellow (1921) depicts an aristocratic cast of eccentrics in a British country house who do nothing but talk...and talk.... Antic Way (1923) shifts to a similar group of Bohemians in London who spend hours in elegant restaurants discussing art and philosophy. With so much conversation and so little action, reading these books aloud is unquestionably the best way to dramatize Huxley's brilliant dialog. Robert Whitfield does it full justice and proves that he is now one of the best narrators in the business. Recommended only for Huxley fans.AJo Carr, Sarasota, FL
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

First novel by Aldous Huxley, published in 1921. The book is a social satire of the British literati in the period following World War I. Crome Yellow revolves around the hapless love affair of Denis Stone, a sensitive poet, and Anne Wimbush. Her uncle, Henry Wimbush, hosts a party at his country estate, Crome Yellow, that brings together a humorous coterie of characters. --The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature

Customer Reviews

This was probably one of the funniest books I've read in a while.
Brian H. Moll
The beginning and ending of the story seems to be interesting enough which sets the reader's imagination to impetus.
veritas
The author uses some big words but his narration is very simple, intelligent and charming..
Chris

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Maggie Tulliver on August 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
When I started reading this book, I had high expectations of Huxley, but was immediately disappointed at what I mistakenly supposed was a hackneyed situation. There was a bad poet hopelessly in love with an unresponsive-not to say cold-female; a sophisticated person, much older in both physical and mental terms, a true to type Woman of the World, and he a clichéd portrait of the kind of person rampant in literature, either as a caricature or as comic relief. Spare me an unrequited-love romance, even as an aside, I inwardly implored.
I was spared.
What I found instead was a delightfully good-natured literary satire on the various "types" found in literature, the kind that every reader recognizes instantly. Here, you find them all, congregated in a short and enchanting novel full of the most subtle and gentle humor-the least obvious and most entertaining joke is, of course, that none of these people can really be taken seriously.
In a parody of characterization in literature, Huxley comes up with: The Philosopher, The "Sensitive" Wannabe Poet, The Serious Pretentious Pseudo Intellectual, The Spiritual Author as the Protégé (Pet) of a Rich lady With Nothing To Do, The Rich Lady With Nothing To Do, The Rich Lady's Husband With Nothing To Do, The Charming Accomplished Amorous Aristocrat With Everything Going For Him, The Mediterranean Artist, The Religious Fanatic, and finally, the Ice Maiden.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Joel Bocko on September 1, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Huxley's talent, especially in his first novel, is to pour out ideas (the subjects and issues covered here are staggeringly diverse for such a short book) without losing the human spark or light touch that keeps you reading. Crome Yellow, the story (I use the word loosely) of fairly lazy aristocrats whiling the weeks away at a luxurious country estate, manages to be at once a dozen (or more) intelligent essays--on all different subjects and from many points of view, a romantic comedy, a character(s) study, a social satire, and a charming short story collection. Aldous Huxley was a young man and when he wrote Crome Yellow in the early twenties (not long out of college) he was more agnostic skeptic and social critic than the psychedelic mystic and dystopian prophet he would become. Yet the themes, and sometimes more, of his later work are all present here. There's a suggestion of mysticism and the "other world," albeit in a more comic manner than The Doors of Perception. Denis, with his anxieties around women and self-loathing, hand-wringing intelligence, is an early version of Bernard in Brave New World. And early in the book (at a pig pen of all places) a character hypothesizes about the future--and describes almost exactly the world Huxley would portray in Brave New World! It's fascinating to see, in this modernist society tale, the seeds of Huxley's future work. But better yet are all the ideas and separate stories Huxley crams into Crome Yellow: the historical tale of a dwarfish aristocrat and his gigantic son, a romantic escapade on the roof between a dashing visitor and the well-read yet thick Mary, the frequent and inept attempts of Denis to woo Anne, and cynical but comparatively content Mr. Scogan, who imagines stories to fill the mock books in the library, and cross-dresses as a fortune teller to scare the villagers at the annual fair. All in all, a great, quick read and a touchstone for all of Huxley's themes in a most unlikely vehicle.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Chris on November 7, 2004
Format: Library Binding
Crome Yellow was Adolous Huxley's first novel. It describes the life of leisure of the Wimbushes, an aging aristocratic couple and the relatives and young intellectuals who are staying with them over the Summer in their estate at the village of Crome.

It has often been remarked that this novel is unserious.There was not really much hilarity contrary to my expectation; the bulk of such stuff as there is was in the first part of the novel. The one passage which made me roar with laughter is Mr. Wimbush solemnly reading to his family and guests a particular excerpt from the history he has just finished of their estate which was built back in the 16th century. The founder of the estate was his wife's ancestor, Ferdinando Lapith whom Mr. Wimbush explains devoted his time to figuring out and publishing his ideas on sanitation. He built privies (indoor outhouses) at the top of each tower for he thought that the act of depositing human waste was such a degrading act for noble creatures like humans that they should be far away from the sanitation disposal system in the ground and as close to heaven as possible. He advised that the privy have a big window on which to look out at nature; a bible, Greek and Roman philosophy and other reading material on hand to console oneself in the act. Sir Ferdinando called his book "Certaine Privy Counsels by One of Her Maiesties's Most Honourable Privy Counsels, F.L. Knight." Mr. Wimbush says Sir Ferdinando wrote on the subject "with great learning and elegance" and Mr. Scogan, one of the Wimbush's guests expresses enchantment of such great achievements of English aristocrats.

Other amusing incidents include the conversation between Denis Smith, the hero of the novel and Mr. Barbecue Smith, the spiritualist New Age author whom Mrs.
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More About the Author

Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) is the author of the classic novels Island, Eyeless in Gaza, and The Genius and the Goddess, as well as such critically acclaimed nonfiction works as The Devils of Loudun, The Doors of Perception, and The Perennial Philosophy. Born in Surrey, England, and educated at Oxford, he died in Los Angeles.

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