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Cronos (The Criterion Collection)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Federico Luppi, Ron Perlman, Claudio Brook
  • Directors: Guillermo del Toro
  • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Criterion Collection
  • DVD Release Date: December 7, 2010
  • Run Time: 92 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (94 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0043VUHV4
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #66,758 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Cronos (The Criterion Collection)" on IMDb

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Audio commentary with Guillermo del Toro
  • Audio commentary with the producers
  • Geometria, an unreleased 1987 short horror film by del Toro
  • Welcome to Bleak House, a video tour by del Toro of his office
  • New video interviews with del Toro, Navarro, and actor Ron Perlman
  • Video interview with actor Federico Luppi
  • Stills gallery
  • Trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by film critic Maitland McDonagh

  • Editorial Reviews

    Product Description

    Guillermo del Toro (Hellboy, Pan’s Labyrinth) made an auspicious, audacious feature debut with CRONOS, a highly unorthodox tale about the seductiveness of the idea of immortality. Kindly antiques dealer Jesús Gris (Federico Luppi) happens upon an ancient golden device in the shape of a scarab, and soon finds himself possessor and victim of its sinister, addictive powers, as well as the target of a mysterious, crude American named Angel (a delightfully deranged Ron Perlman [Hellboy]). Featuring marvelous special makeup effects and the unforgettably haunting imagery for which del Toro has become world-renowned, CRONOS is a visually rich and emotionally captivating dark fantasy.

    Amazon.com

    Guillermo del Toro's facility with baroque visuals, gothic horror, and black comedy comes to the fore in his first feature (his affection for creepy-crawlies also anticipates the underrated Mimic). A 16th-century prologue reveals the origins of the scarab-shaped Cronos device, which allowed a Spanish alchemist to expand his lifetime by several centuries. In the present day, Mexican antiquities dealer Jesús Gris (Federico Luppi, who reunited with del Toro for The Devil's Backbone) dotes on his unflappable granddaughter, Aurora (Tamara Shanath). When the device ends up in Gris's shop, he tangles with the petulant Angel (Hellboy's Ron Perlman), whose critically ill uncle, Dieter (Claudio Brook, Exterminating Angel), longs to purchase the relic, but Gris isn't selling. After the mechanism stings the merchant, he feels more youthful, and becomes addicted to the sensation. His newfound taste for blood, however, only increases after he morphs into a nocturnal creature, much like Mimic's man-sized cockroach. With Cronos, del Toro created a unique vampire-zombie hybrid, since Gris's resistance to age blooms just as his flesh starts to wither. In an excellent commentary track, he describes the movie as a reinvention of the vampire myth in alchemical terms. Other extras include commentary from the producers, a gory student short, a tour of the director's amazing offices, interviews with cast and crew (including Luppi and Perlman), a stills gallery (including family photographs), and an essay by film critic Maitland McDonagh, who praises del Toro as a filmmaker with an eye "attuned to the beauty in the darkness." --Kathleen C. Fennessy

    Customer Reviews

    This film is the first full length by Guillermo Del Toro and it is great!
    The_Unknown_Rebel
    I might have been expecting more after seeing IMDB's 6.8 rating, but even being generous I wouldn't rate "Cronos" that high.
    Adam S. M.
    Instead of babeling on about how good the film is, I'll just say that this is a movie worth watching.
    Marty Kingsley

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    59 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Marc Ruby™ HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on March 30, 2005
    Format: DVD
    For some reason I developed an early low opinion of Mexican horror films and have since avoided them. Fortunately I didn't realize Cronos was Mexican ans so got to see this truly unusual film directed by Guilliermo del Toro. While it will never win a place on the heights there's a surprising amount of inventiveness and imaginative film work in something that probably has one-tenth the budget of the average Hollywood failure.

    Imagine, if you will that a European alchemist fled Europe to Mexico in the 16th Century. Gaining appointment as the Governor's clockmaker he set about making a machine that would prolong his life. He succeeds and lives until a building collapses on him in modern times. His estate is broken up and sold and the real story begins when an antique dealer, Jesus Gris (Federico Luppi), acquires a statue of an angel. In it he finds a golden scarab-like machine. One with horrific powers that Jesus inadvertently activates.

    Seeking the scarab for his own purposes is Dieter de la Guardia (Claudio Brook) and his last remaining relative Angel (Ron Perlman). They will stop at nothing, but a repeatedly foiled by the scarab's power over Jesus. Another key player is Aurora Gris (Tamara Shanath) who has no lines but seems to preside over the life and death drama that plays out before her.

    There are a few grim and violent moments, but, for the most part, Cronos gains its momentum from its atmospherics. Imagine a screenplay written by Poe and directed by Fellini with echoes of Don't Look Now and you will have a sense of the film's feeling. Colors are dark, sets are detailed, and the minimal special effects are telling. Especially the insides and operation of the clockwork scarab.
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    46 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Wayne Klein HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 26, 2004
    Format: DVD
    Guillermo Del Toro's modern Grimm's Fairy Tale "Cronos" focuses as much on character as it does horror. In many respects, it's a throw back to the horror comic books or movies he watched as a kid updated. Antiques dealer Jesus Gris (Federico Luppi) gets more than he bargains for when he covers a ornate gold "beetle" at the base of a decorative angel. He and his devoted granddaughter and wife discover the promise of immortality but also the horrible price one must pay when given a "gift" such as this.

    Rich industrialist Dieter de la Guardia (Claudio Brook) has his brutish nephew Angel (Ron Perlman)searching for the device himself. Only Dieter knows about the history of the device, what it can do and the consquences of using it. When Jesus resists Dieter's offer for the device, it also puts his family in peril.

    A rich, allegorical horror film that recalls the classic films of the 30's and 40's with its focus on character and the consquences of their actions at the expense of endless blood and gore, "Cronos" is a thoughtful, sad movie that demonstrated the considerable talents of Del Toro ("The Devil's Backbone", "Blade II", "Hellboy"). It's got its moments of gross out gore but Del Toro focuses his story on the delicate relationship between Jesus, his wife and granddaughter.

    The film is presented with the original Spanish voiceover presented in English. After that, the film is a mix of Spanish and English as Dieter and Angel speak both sparingly throughout the film while Jesus and his family speak nothing but English. It would probably help to have on the subtitles if you don't speak English during the film as it switches back and forth pretty consistently.
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    14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Troy M. Ros on October 12, 2002
    Format: VHS Tape
    Before Guillermo del Toro came to Hollywood to make big budget thrillers such as Mimic and Blade II, he was in Mexico making movies that are truly unique and filled with tension. His directorial debut, Cronos, is a hugely original movie and take on the vampire theme. Guillermo also wrote the screenplay.
    The movie opens up with a narrator telling the story of an alchemist who made a metallic, beetle like device (the Cronos) that when placed against skin, has a scorpion like stinger that stabs the person and injects a tiny amount of bloody fluid. The injections cause the alchemist to live for centuries and only dies when he is in line at a bank in Vera Cruz during an earthquake and is crushed by falling debris.
    Some time later, an antique dealer, Jesus Gris (Federico Luppi), discovers the Cronos device in the base of an old statue he has acquired. After wondering what the device might be for, he inadvertently sets it off and is pricked by it's stinger. The whole process of watching this happen is fascinating, and you are never quite sure if there is some sort of living insect inside the enclosure, thanks to Guillermo's David Lynch like photography and editing of the scene.
    Jesus soon discovers that he has more energy and feels more youthful than he has in ages. But unbeknownst to him, there is an evil and rich old man, Dieter de la Guardia (Claudio Brook) who has been searching for years for the device. He has tracked it down to Jesus' shop and sends his simple minded nephew, Angel de la Guardia (brilliantly portrayed by Ron Perlman), to get the statue that has stored in it, the Cronos device. When the statue turns up empty, Dieter instructs Angel to get the device at any cost.
    In the meantime, Jesus has become addicted to using the device.
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    Most Recent Customer Reviews


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