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Crooked Little Heart Paperback – January 1, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Random House Books; Advance Reader's Copy edition (1997)
  • ISBN-10: 0385491808
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385491808
  • ASIN: B001NCFZ5E
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.2 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Anne Lamott is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Grace (Eventually), Plan B, Traveling Mercies, and Operating Instructions, as well as seven novels, including Rosie and Crooked Little Heart. She is a past recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Customer Reviews

The book really has no ending--or a very flimsy one.
Carolyn
And that is what I hope for most as a reader -- a book that I can bring something of myself to.
Michelle K. Westenbroek
I adored this book the first time I read it, and I'm rereading it again now, a year later.
Alicia

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Ada Cole on April 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
In my other reveiw of "Rosie", the prequel to this book, I was rather hard on Lamott. Her non fiction, Travelling Mercies, Bird by Bird, Operating Instructions, is so compassionate, witty, and funny, that it is hard to believe that she wrote Rosie and Hard Laughter. This book is finally the work of fiction I believed that she could produce.
It follows the story of Rosie during the summer of her 13th year, and trials and tribulations that are realistic and engaging. Although the focus on tennis was a little too detailed and technical, the rest of the story is wrapped around it in tenderness and diverts the focus from that aspect.
Although somewhat similar to Nabokov's Lolita in theme, this book explores in full the lives of each main character. You can more clearly see the effects of the events that occurred in Rosie, and they are painted more brilliantly and lovingly.
The characters are easy to identify with. There's Rae who weaves beautiful tapestries with junk yarn, but seems to want to do the same with the junky men in her lives. There's Rosie who lives in frustrated teenage self-doubt. There's Elizabeth, who sinks and struggles and is, all in all, extremely irritating. Then, there's Luthor, the Steppenwolf of the story, who is dark and scary and mysterious, but has insight that Rosie desperately needs.
You will find in reading this that the details of daily life are irresistably and eloquently captured - the feeling of laying with your lover knees bent into knees, the shine of dust particles in the light of the window, the fight that explodes and dissipates and the feeling of relief when love comes again.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By CoffeeGurl HALL OF FAME on February 14, 2003
Format: Paperback
I re-read this book recently and was pleased to find that I wasn't wrong about it the first time: it's wonderful, just as satisfying as any of the others, although I am partial to each new book as it arrives, like a gorgeous newborn. I didn't read Crooked Little Heart, I absorbed it. I fell in love with Rae and Lank -- their love story is one of the most poignant ones I have ever read. I know they will end up together. I just know it. I am dying to know more about Rae, actually. Will James ever learn to dress? Will any of us? Keep it up, Anne.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 17, 2001
Format: Paperback
In the six months since I read CLH, I have thought of pieces of it hundreds of times. I think Anne Lamott is an amazing writer, one of the best contemporary American writers we have, along with Fred Chappell, Louise Erdrich, Kaye Gibbons, and Lee Smith, to name a few. I think with any piece of fiction the reader must be willing to enter the author's constructed world on their terms. I loved the title of CLH and wanted to know all that lay behind it. Also, I knew I liked Lamott's writing from some of her nonfiction. So, I kept going even though it took me several chapters to become fully engaged in the story. I find so much of her imagery and metaphor incredible that even without caring about tennis at all, I wanted to keep going. Plus, I trusted her to take me somewhere worthwhile. And she did. I love that Luther tells Rosie, You're not a cheater. You're someone who cheated. I saw so much compassion and honesty in that exchange. I think it's what the book was written for, and that it is more than enough to justify the story's length. Another of my favorite lines is also near the end, where Rosie tells Elizabeth, We're not like a real family, we're like some family you'd buy at a garage sale. (This may not be exact, I do not have the book with me). By that time, you realize that Lamott is saying most real families are that way, and that's the beauty of the thing--along with the fact that Rosie as an adolescent is not yet fully aware of how much of life really is like something you get at a garage sale and make do with and come to love devotedly.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 12, 1999
Format: Paperback
I realize that due to certain anatomical features I do not belong to the 51% of the population that is this book's target audience, however, my equal love of wemon's tennis and coming-of-age narratives drew me in. And I must say that for the most part I truly loved the parts that dealt with Rosie. It reminded me at times of the short-lived ABC series, "My So-Called Life," which also sometimes captured the sensibilty of teen-age life with impressive immediacy. Unfortunately the book is cluttered with several less interesing characters. The worst of these being Elizabeth and Rae, the first of which I found unbelievable and the second alternately pretentious and trite. Ms. Lamott would have been better served to pare this novel down to a tenth of its current length where it might have made a luminous short story with Rosie as its sole focus and all these other peripheral characters either eliminated altogether or marginalized to where they no longer bore or irritate. As it stands the menace of Luther is so diluted that by the time we reach the climactic scene between him and Rosie we feel cheated. A problem that would not occur in short story where the reader doesn't have so much time to predict what will happen next. But, then again, maybe I am just not a member of the target audience.
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