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Cross-Collateral Import


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Audio CD, Import, November 10, 1998
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (November 10, 1998)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Warner Spec. Mkt. UK
  • ASIN: B0000072TB
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #100,800 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Homunculus
2. Cross-Collateral
3. Jadoo
4. Will-O'the-Wisp
5. Albatros Song
6. Damals

Editorial Reviews

German Jazz Multi-Instrumentalist Klaus Doldinger Used the Group Passport a Vehicle for his Artistic Expression. This 1975 Title, Rereleased in 1988, Contains Many Standout Jazz Fusion Moments, Including the Epic Title Track, 'Jadoo', 'Homunculus' & Three Others.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
25
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See all 26 customer reviews
The best Passport that I've heard.
AbbysK
I've had this album in one form or other since perhaps 1977, and I still listen to it on a regular basis.
MightyFavog
I'm a big fan of Passport's mid-70s albums.
P. Quijada

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 19, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Recorded in 1975, CROSS-COLLATERAL is undoubtably the most intense and hard-hitting of PASSPORT's fusion output. The compositions are brain-twistingly complex and fast, yet there are spacious subtleties throughout this disc. From the modal brilliance of HOMMUNCULUS, the dynamically progressive CROSS-COLLATERAL to the street-funk drive of JADOO, Klaus Doldinger showcases his quartet's ability to master difficult material, solo tastefully and comp with active group synergy and do it all with impeccable musicianship. Line-up: Curt Cress, drums. Kristian Schultze, keyboards. Wolfgang Schmidt, bass & guitar. Klaus Doldinger, saxes, keyboards, synthesizers.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey J.Park VINE VOICE on May 16, 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is another great album to come out of the incredibly diverse 1970s German music scene. Interestingly enough, although this 1975 album is a jazz-rock album, it is loosely tied to the German experimental rock scene (in my mind at any rate) in that Passport shared a producer with bands such as the Cosmic Jokers - namely, Deiter Dierks. The production quality by the way, is stellar.

The musicians on this album include bandleader Klaus Doldinger (tenor and soprano saxes, mini-moog synthesizer, electric piano, and mellotron); incredible drummer Curt Cress; Wolfgang Schmid (Rickenbacker bass and acoustic guitar on Damals); and Kristian Schulze (Fender electric piano and Hammond organ).

There are six pieces on the album and range in length from 4'38" to 13'38". Stylistically, the album is mostly jazz rock, but there are elements of progressive rock scattered here and there. That is to say that the rhythms and chord structures are not always jazzy, and that melodies are used more often than is characteristic of most jazz rock. There is also the choice of instrumentation, which includes the mini-moog and most notably the mellotron, which is used on Albatross Song. Although synthesizers were being used by other jazz rock groups around this time including Return to Forever, their use on Cross-Collateral seems somewhat more...British. Furthermore, the bassist's decision to use a trebly, punchy Rickenbacker bass rather than, say a fretless Fender jazz bass, was unusual.

In a nutshell, the performances by all of the musicians are superb, especially those by Billy Cobham influenced drummer Curt Cress. In fact, many of the pieces seem to revolve around the drummer!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 23, 1999
Format: Audio CD
I saw them perform this album live for the first time which was also their first live show back on German soil after they were previously whistled off stage for playing their new fusion/electronic style jazz and had left Germany for a while. Undoubtedly one of Klaus Doldinger's finest musical achievements which, to my mind, ranks right up there with Volker Kriegel's "Journal" and John McLaughlin's "Birds of Fire". A timeless piece of modern european jazz that still thrills me after all these years. Horst
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By BENJAMIN MILER on June 13, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Passport was no doubt one of the best known fusion groups to come out of Germany. I have to say I am not big on fusion, but on occasions, I find an album that grabs me. Like this 1975 album from Passport. Cross-Collateral (1975) was not their second album, it was their fifth, but it was only their second American release. Looking Thru (1974) was their first U.S. release. They already had three albums previous to Looking Thru, Hand Made (1973), Second Passport (1972) and Doldinger (1971, the big anomaly in the Passport catalog as to having Amon Duul II members helping out).

By Looking Thru, the group finally had a stable lineup that would last them around three or four years, and of course a string of albums fans of the band most associate Passport with. The lineup consisted of saxist/keyboardist Klaus Doldinger (who was born in 1936, meaning he was knocking around the music business since the 1950s, and Passport was simply his 1970s and '80s project), drummer Curt Cress (who you'll find on nearly every other German prog rock album from Atlantis to Trimvirat), keyboardist Kristian Schultze, and bassist/guitarist Wolfgang Schmidt. I really think that Cross-Collateral is certainly a high point in the career in Passport (of the albums I've heard, as I hadn't heard any of their pre-Looking Thru albums, and I was warned about the stuff they did after Infinity Machine). "Homunculus" is a wonderful number, dominated by clavinet, and some nice themes played by Doldinger's sax. The title track is a real interesting one as it goes through several changes from wild and experimental to more mellow passages and funky passages with clavinet. It's truly an amazing piece.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 25, 1998
Format: Audio CD
I also have worn out the LP, which I have owned since the '70s. I played the CD for my 22 year old music freak nephew and he was blown away. A must have.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sarah4Now on January 27, 2005
Format: Audio CD
I first heard this album in November, 1981. It was on Atco records at the time and side one consists of only two tracks: "Homunculus" and the 13 and a half minute title track. Klaus Doldinger and the boys really know how to make unique electronic jazz music. I think the title song is so exciting with it's everchanging style. It's basically a suite. In my opinion, it is best during Curt Cress' drum solo. It reminds me of Danny Seraphine's "Motorboat" solo from Chicago III. Side two includes four tracks, one of which is called "Jadoo" which sounds to me like the theme of the seventies' cop-show that never was. If you are just starting a collection of Passport CDs, I recommend "Cross Collateral", one of the best Jazz/Fusion albums ever.
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