Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.99
  • Save: $3.17 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: No highlighting.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Cross Creek Cookery Paperback – Illustrated, March 20, 1996


See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$7.95
Paperback, Illustrated
"Please retry"
$13.82
$4.20 $1.92

Frequently Bought Together

Cross Creek Cookery + Cross Creek + Cross Creek
Price for all three: $35.29

Buy the selected items together
  • Cross Creek $15.12
  • Cross Creek $6.35

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Fireside; 1st Fireside ed edition (March 20, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684818787
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684818788
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #319,038 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (1896-1953) is the celebrated American author of The Yearling, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1939. 

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
24
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 26 customer reviews
Just glancing through the book, I can tell I will love it.
MrsG
Cross Creek Cookery is a wonderful book full of delicious recipes that really work.
Mary T. Leadon
Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings wrote a book of love, Southern cookery, and humor.
J. N. Sloane

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By R. D. Allison (dallison@biochem.med.ufl.edu) on May 9, 1999
Format: Paperback
As the other reviewer has mentioned, this is a collection of recipes, filled with anecdotes of central Florida life in the 1930s and 1940s. The recipes are fantastic and one wants to try all of them (although it may be difficult to prepare alligator-tail steak). And, what a pleasure it is to read a cookbook written by an accomplished author. You just keep picking it up.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 31, 1997
Format: Paperback
It is evident from her cookbook that Marjorie tasted of nearly everything and learned to make delicious dishes out of some very odd things: Poke Weed (on toast), Pot Roast of Bear, Smother-Fried Squirrel, Gopher Stew, Coot Surprise, Jugged Rabbit, a host of Pilaus, and an infamous blackbird pie. Of course this book is not simply a culinary freak-show. There are dozens of recipes for desserts, seafood, meats-found-at-the-A&P, jams, and soups, featuring ingredients of which we are all familiar and unafraid. She was proud to share them and claimed each recipe was nothing short of first-rate. Included among these is her piece de resistance, Crab A La Newburg, and the best Strawberry Shortcake ever. Accompanied by anecdotes of Florida rural living in the 1930s and 1940s, this book is a delight and an excursion from a mundane kitchen
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By JK on December 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
I've been a fan of Rawlings since I first read her as a teenager. Reading her biography many years ago, I learned of her pride in her cooking. I didn't even know she'd issued a cookbook until I came across this edition!
Upon reading the book I was immediately reminded of the "Alice B. Toklas" cookbook. The structure and literary emphasis are much the same. Thus, for the same reason, it's a joy to read even if one doesn't cook!
However, like "Toklas", the recipes are also a treasure. Many of the recipes contain ingredients too exotic for the average cook, but many more are easily prepared. This can also be a pleasurable and valuable resource for those, like me, who enjoy reading and preparing recipes from old cookbooks. Our eating styles have changed enormously in the nearly sixty years since Rawlings wrote this book.
If you are a fan of Rawlings, buy the book whether you ever plan to cook any of its recipes. Its reasonable cost is a further bonus!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J. Scott Shipman on August 22, 2005
Format: Paperback
A big fan of MKR, I stumbled over this little book at a booksale several years ago----it's paperback and coming apart from use, and the pure pleasure of reading Ms. Rawlings' commentary and recollections of living at Cross Creek. Her biscuit and hoe-cake recipes are worth the price, as they evoked memories of my grandmothers kitchen where it wasn't a meal without fresh, hot bread.

Highly recommended---even if you're not a cook!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By NoseDaddy on February 3, 2010
Format: Paperback
CULINARY FREAK SHOW!!!!!!!!! Shame on your black yankee heart. I have regularly eaten with gusto most of the recipies that earlier reviwer vilifies. I am a 1947 vintage son of a South Carolina good ol' boy who managed to marry a wonderful New Yawker (actually from the city so nice they named it twice, NY, NY) and convince her to move to the farm in the coastal Low Country which is very similar to central Florida. My Ma couldn't stand the culture shock too long and my parents carried me and my three sisters off to a dairy farm on Long Island in 1956 where I grew up in exile and loss, pining away for swamp country though I still had walking distance access to frequent fishing expeditions at a very nearby beach. My Ma cooked very little game since we did not hunt once we moved north but she was an excellent cook with a German heritage slant to her cooking repertoire. I was raised up there on a more refined cooking style which I have always appreciated but still missed the game dishes of my earlier days. I read this book and others by Rawlings in high school and was prepped with recipies when I headed south after my release from Uncle Sam's SE Asia branch of the School of Hard Knocks. Coming to rest on wild, remote family land in SC (hey, I might be white but I never was particularly poor and I'm surely not trash) I pumped my Aunts for ways to cook fish and game and frequently broke out my copy of this book to supplement my own experimentation with food that had never heard of a grocery store.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. N. Sloane on August 29, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings wrote a book of love, Southern cookery, and humor. It opens with the quote, "To preserve discipline in our armed forces, I demand CROSS CREEK be banned in or near any encampment." (Apparently, the description of fabulous foods was destroying morale.) The book closes with the quote, "Better a dinner of herbs where love is." What comes between is a broad variety of dishes and stories that delight the palate and the soul.

The recipe for watermelon cake is missing several letters/words/instructions. (Any Floridian will tell you of books and papers lost to the appetites of our sacred palmetto bugs.) The instructions on turtle eggs include proper collection to conserve the species. (Collection is now banned due to people abusing this harvest.) And the mystery of Minorcan Gopher Stew is answered by a preceding historical account and the hint that one must cut away the shell of the gopher. (Gopher tortoise is a threatened species.)

It is not just a cookbook; it is a wonderfully written window on a world not so long ago in years, but ages ago in tradition.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?