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Crossing Jordan Paperback – July 1, 2002


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • Paperback: 140 pages
  • Publisher: Peachtree Publishers (July 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1561452815
  • ISBN-13: 978-1561452811
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 6.1 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #224,585 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 5–8—In Adrian Fogelin's contemporary novel (Peachtree, 2000), set in Tallahassee, Florida, 12-year-old Cass Bodine's racist father erects a fence between his house and the house of their new next door neighbors, who are black. "If they stay out of our business and we stay out of theirs, we'll get along fine," he informs his daughter. Despite the racial prejudice on both sides of the fence, Cass and Jemmie, the girl next door, become best friends through a mutual love of running and the trials and tribulations of reading Jane Eyre. When the parents discover the girls' secretive relationship, they forbid them to see each other. But events continue to evolve, and the hearts of both families are tested. The rationale behind bigotry is well fleshed out and delicately examined, but sometimes feels a little over done. Nevertheless, the characters are believable and the story line is sensitive and honest. Fogelin's narration reflects her intricate knowledge of the characters, and she brings the emotional depth of each scene to life. Southern life resonates as the author expertly defines each character's unique traits and dialect. An engrossing, evenhanded look at prejudice and interracial friendship.—Robyn Gioia, Bolles School, Ponte Vedra, FL
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"In this sensitive portrait of black-white relations in a changing neighborhood, Fogelin offers a tactful, evenhanded look at prejudice." --USA Today
"Fogelin creates Cass and Jemmie as complex characters with the same differences of approach and personality that mark the interactions of other best friends, whatever their skin color. Cass' straightforward voice never falters, even when she questions her father's beliefs and her own decisions. Readers will appreciate the honesty of Fogelin's approach and applaud the two girls in their fast friendship." --The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"...Jemmie and Cass are likable, lively characters, and readers will enjoy the repartee between them." --School Library Journal
"Old experiences and lifelong attitudes are hard to overcome, as Adrian Fogelin deftly demonstrates in her portrayal of Cass' dad and Jemmie's mom. Fogelin's characters are complex, fallible, and loving, as are real people, making Crossing Jordan an engrossing coming-of-age story...." --Orange County Register


More About the Author

Adrian Fogelin is the daughter of fiction writer, Maria Bontempi Fogelin, and grew up in a house littered with manuscripts. A slow early reader Fogelin took in stories as her mother read aloud, and in the lively exchange of family tales, giving her writing the freshness of the spoken word.

She is the author of seven novels for middle-grade and young adult readers, including the hugely popular "Crossing Jordan," and has won numerous awards including two Florida Book Award gold medals.

Although she might not pass the "Are you really a grownup?" test, Fogelin definitely gets kids, from the way they talk to the things they yearn for. She is a frequent visitor to schools and libraries all over the counry where she shares her love of writing and story.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 32 customer reviews
It moves the plot and the characters no where.
Ellerbee
It is a story of friendship and neighbors and how hearts are stronger than bigotry.
Mary Z. Cox
Crossing Jordan is one of the best Young Adult books ever written.
Ronald G. Miller

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on June 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is one of the best books I have ever read!! It is about a girl named Cass living in Tallahase, Florida. When a African American family moves in next door, Cass' father builds a fence to separate the families since his family is white. Cass becomes friends with Jemmie, the new girl. This is a story about how Cass and her new friend Jemmie become friends, run races and ultimately make their families see that the color of their skin shouldn't affect their relationship's.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on July 17, 2006
Format: Paperback
I read this book, I loved it. My great aunt wrote it, so we have all her other books. I think this is great for people who want a good book to settle into. It is very bittersweet, and the characters are loveable and funny. This book is great!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover
What a fine book Fogelin has written! The author's sensitive protrayal of two friends, one white, one African American, and the barriers they break though, despite what the adults in their lives want them to accept, is inspiring. Fogelin doesn't paint either main character---or her family---as completely without fault in this story about the impact that a tradition of racist attitudes has on two young adolescents. Both families carry hurtful attitudes, but the girls transcend those limiting attitudes. Another positive feature that is almost unique to this short novel is Fogelin presents the female protagonists as competitive athletes who love to run; portrayals of female athletes as leading characters are rare in books for young people.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on November 14, 2005
Format: Paperback
In the book Crossing Jordan, an Afriacan American family moves next to a white family. The white family are racists and build a fence to avoid them. The white family has a daughter named Cassie and she looks through a knothole at the family as they move in. The other families daughter, Jemmie, sees her and Cassie challenges her to race at a nearby track. They quickly become friends and relize that they have a lot in common. Their families find out that they are friends, but that is not going to stop them. They make thier families realize that it doesn't matter what color you are, we are all the same. In the end the families are friends and have dinners together occasionally.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on November 14, 2005
Format: Paperback
In the book Crossing Jordan, an Afriacan American family moves next to a white family. The white family are racists and build a fence to avoid them. The white family has a daughter named Cassie and she looks through a knothole at the family as they move in. The other families daughter, Jemmie, sees her and Cassie challenges her to race at a nearby track. They quickly become friends and relize that they have a lot in common. Their families find out that they are friends, but that is not going to stop them. They make thier families realize that it doesn't matter what color you are, we are all the same. In the end the families are friends and have dinners together occasionally.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 5, 2002
Format: Hardcover
In many ways Crossing Jordan is one of the best books I have ever read. The plot was great, it really shows how hard it used to be for black Americans. At first the white girl, Cass doesn't know how to act when a black family moves in next door. She doesn't like them at first, since her dad doesn't. After awhile the black girl, Jemmie and Cass became friends and struggle to keep their friedship even though their parents don't like each other. This book is a lot like Burning Up. Both books are about the seperation between blacks and whites, and the struggle the blacks had. I recommened this book for everyone to read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on November 24, 2002
Format: Paperback
I am 7 now, but when I read this book I was only 6. Crossing Jordan is a very serious and sad book. Whenever I think of the book I always smile. It made me want to read Jane Eyre because the characters in the book were reading that and really liked it. This book is about two girls who are very fast runners. One is white and one is black. Their parents don't want them to be together, but they disobey them. This book was so exciting, that I could hardly sit still when I read it. I think you will love this book too.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 22, 2005
Format: Paperback
If you are looking for a real outstanding book you should read Crossing Jordan. I think that it is a really good book. It is sad, it has racism, and it is mysterious. You would also like this because there is a lot of action in it. The book starts off with Cass being bored and no one to play with. Her father has also built a fence between her house, and the new neighbor's house.Then she sees out the window someone is moving in next door. Cass saw that there was a girl that looked just like her age, and she was African American. She went to meet her and her name was Jemmie. They became best friends. They are both really good runners. They run so fast. A day after they started to read a book called Jane Eyre. They both loved that book. . Two weeks later Jemmie and Cass were going to run in a really long race. Cass and Jemmie are a team in the race and they call themselves chocolate milk. . You have to read this book to see what happens to the race and see who wins.
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