Crossing Oceans

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I added a video to a @YouTube playlist http://t.co/f5Bu68Q2W8 Troubled Sons - Do You Feel Like We Do? (Cover) Highlights


Biography

Band Origins

The band’s name, Crossing Oceans, is reflective of the diversity of its members and the vast number of musical styles their music echoes. Oceans are crossed physically, generationally, and philosophically to build this band and this sound.

Physically:

John and Frank are bound to the East Coast of the Continental U.S. by birth. Walter arrived in the U.S. from the Netherlands in 2003. Shortly after his arrival in America, he was invited, through a friend-of-a-friend, to a birthday party at John’s house, where he met and hit it off with John’s sister-in-law. It wasn’t long ... Read more

Band Origins

The band’s name, Crossing Oceans, is reflective of the diversity of its members and the vast number of musical styles their music echoes. Oceans are crossed physically, generationally, and philosophically to build this band and this sound.

Physically:

John and Frank are bound to the East Coast of the Continental U.S. by birth. Walter arrived in the U.S. from the Netherlands in 2003. Shortly after his arrival in America, he was invited, through a friend-of-a-friend, to a birthday party at John’s house, where he met and hit it off with John’s sister-in-law. It wasn’t long before he began frequenting all family functions at her side.

After some conversations centered on shared interests, John and Walter began exploring a mutual interest in playing music in late 2004, messing around with some covers on the guitar and drums in John’s basement. After many months of weekly jam sessions, they decided that the relationship should be defined, and that meant committing to the idea that they were, in fact, in a band together. That was a scary proposition for a couple of thirty-something bankers, but they decided that their efforts deserved a name and some goals. A couple of late-night burger-n-brew sessions later, they had an epiphany. Why not “Crossing Oceans”? Walter had crossed the Atlantic and joined a band, so it seemed fitting. Turns out, the name would take on many more meanings, revealed through time.

Philosophically:

Ro-Sham-Bo. Satellite Green. Francis The Pig.

Any of these band names sound familiar? Hit the “Like” button now to make your presence known!

We’re hearing crickets over here.

Anyone?

C’est la vie.

Chances are, unless you are part of a VERY select group of people who share a time and place in Reno Nevada’s history, you’ll draw a blank, but a few people might remember that John played in a couple of bands during his time living there before forming Crossing Oceans.

Growing up, he fantasized about being on the drummer’s throne for KISS, Van Halen, Ozzy, Rush, Yes, Genesis, Queen, or Jethro Tull, living the rock n’ roll lifestyle, traveling the globe. He loves stage lights, big amplifiers, smoke machines, pyrotechnics, groupies, roadies, obnoxiously large drum kits, flashy guitars and screaming fans.

A taste of the stage has always left John wanting more, but the struggles of life have led him down a different, more practical path for many years.

Enter Walter. He was not an obvious choice to fill the gap in John’s musical void. Though they shared a short list of common favorite pop/rock songs, Walter’s tastes are more rooted in the folk/philosopher approach to music. He likes the idea of playing his acoustic guitar around a campfire, serenading friends under the star light, or reclining in the bow of a sailboat, the wind in his hair, and a guitar pick in his hand. During his journey through life, he’s acquired a taste for Latin and Caribbean rhythms, though he’s always harbored a curiosity for the nuances of an electric guitar.

Though the fusion of musical tastes did not begin immediately, they both shared a love for playing, and were both easy going, preferring to smile and laugh over a few beers rather than butting heads and competing for the title of “Rock God of the Universe”.

It was a slow, organic process, with many moments of doubt, but what finally emerged was an amalgamation of two diverse musical interests into a sound that, while it is firmly rooted in rock n’ roll, is not afraid to venture into other categories of popular music to find it’s purpose.

John says, “He’s a Stones guy, and I’m a Beatles guy. He likes stripped down production, soulful, if unpolished, vocals, and a solid back beat. I like big production, precise, challenging vocals, and intricate rhythms. There’s a musical tension between us that permeates our writing and, I think, makes magic happen. I wouldn’t change his philosophy if I could.”

John’s younger brother, Ron, stepped in to play bass for the band for a couple of years, and gave the band what it desperately needed: a taste of playing in front of an audience. Though his path in life has led him a different way, he will always be a member of Crossing Oceans. His eternal membership was earned by crossing an ocean of great resistance to be with and help his family and this band at a time in his life when he was faced with a great many hardships and challenges of his own. In another time and place, he would still be actively helping to steer our course.

Stones? Beatles? Who’s That? Are they anything like Seether?

Frank was 10 years old when John and Walter began having jam sessions.

He was walking around in diapers when John left his previous band in Reno, and moved to the East Coast.

He wasn’t even born when John took the stage with his first band, Ro-Sham-Bo.

He’s 8 months younger than John’s first daughter.

He completely missed the 70’s and 80’s, and doesn’t remember a whole lot about the 90’s!

Those are some fun facts, but as far as the band is concerned, that’s all they are: simple, fun facts. They mean absolutely nothing when you look at the level of talent, promise, energy, enthusiasm and maturity Frank displays.

He was Crossing Oceans’ first and most dedicated fan. He’s actually listened repeatedly to the songs we’ve posted on MySpace (now My_, or something like that). How many of you can say that? Come on? We know better…remember, there are “play counts” on there! He was always front-and-center at our performances. He learned to play our stuff on his guitar, and always treated us as comrades who shared a common love for music.

When we found ourselves without a bass player last year, he bravely offered his services, even though he currently heads up his own band, Darkin, playing guitar, writing, and singing for this young and focused band. With barely a moment of pause to consider the differences in age, John and Walter embraced the opportunity to play with someone so driven to work at his craft.

After just a couple of practices, the generation gap was forgotten. It was an easy ocean to cross, given his natural talent and good humor. He’s added a fresh gust of wind to Crossing Oceans’ sails, and his story is just beginning to unfold.

Oceans Crossed:

Music is an emotional experience that touches everyone in some way. The performers and the types of music they play define moments in time, shape our thinking, drive fashion, and influence future music enthusiasts. There would be no Bullet For My Valentine without Metallica, no Metallica without Black Sabbath, no Sabbath without the Beatles and Stones, and no Beatles and Stones without Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly and Bill Haley. Even they would not have done what they did without the contributions of blues men like Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters…and yes, they got their ideas from someone before them too.

Music has united countless people across deep and broad oceans of experience and culture. It is the bond by which the members of Crossing Oceans have come together as friends. As they look to create and perform new music, they tap into the work that has come before to fuel their inspirations. They continue to expand their boundaries, trying with each new song to cross great voids in musical interests while fulfilling their own personal sense of what sounds good, and hopefully, creating a song that is unique to Crossing Oceans.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Band Origins

The band’s name, Crossing Oceans, is reflective of the diversity of its members and the vast number of musical styles their music echoes. Oceans are crossed physically, generationally, and philosophically to build this band and this sound.

Physically:

John and Frank are bound to the East Coast of the Continental U.S. by birth. Walter arrived in the U.S. from the Netherlands in 2003. Shortly after his arrival in America, he was invited, through a friend-of-a-friend, to a birthday party at John’s house, where he met and hit it off with John’s sister-in-law. It wasn’t long before he began frequenting all family functions at her side.

After some conversations centered on shared interests, John and Walter began exploring a mutual interest in playing music in late 2004, messing around with some covers on the guitar and drums in John’s basement. After many months of weekly jam sessions, they decided that the relationship should be defined, and that meant committing to the idea that they were, in fact, in a band together. That was a scary proposition for a couple of thirty-something bankers, but they decided that their efforts deserved a name and some goals. A couple of late-night burger-n-brew sessions later, they had an epiphany. Why not “Crossing Oceans”? Walter had crossed the Atlantic and joined a band, so it seemed fitting. Turns out, the name would take on many more meanings, revealed through time.

Philosophically:

Ro-Sham-Bo. Satellite Green. Francis The Pig.

Any of these band names sound familiar? Hit the “Like” button now to make your presence known!

We’re hearing crickets over here.

Anyone?

C’est la vie.

Chances are, unless you are part of a VERY select group of people who share a time and place in Reno Nevada’s history, you’ll draw a blank, but a few people might remember that John played in a couple of bands during his time living there before forming Crossing Oceans.

Growing up, he fantasized about being on the drummer’s throne for KISS, Van Halen, Ozzy, Rush, Yes, Genesis, Queen, or Jethro Tull, living the rock n’ roll lifestyle, traveling the globe. He loves stage lights, big amplifiers, smoke machines, pyrotechnics, groupies, roadies, obnoxiously large drum kits, flashy guitars and screaming fans.

A taste of the stage has always left John wanting more, but the struggles of life have led him down a different, more practical path for many years.

Enter Walter. He was not an obvious choice to fill the gap in John’s musical void. Though they shared a short list of common favorite pop/rock songs, Walter’s tastes are more rooted in the folk/philosopher approach to music. He likes the idea of playing his acoustic guitar around a campfire, serenading friends under the star light, or reclining in the bow of a sailboat, the wind in his hair, and a guitar pick in his hand. During his journey through life, he’s acquired a taste for Latin and Caribbean rhythms, though he’s always harbored a curiosity for the nuances of an electric guitar.

Though the fusion of musical tastes did not begin immediately, they both shared a love for playing, and were both easy going, preferring to smile and laugh over a few beers rather than butting heads and competing for the title of “Rock God of the Universe”.

It was a slow, organic process, with many moments of doubt, but what finally emerged was an amalgamation of two diverse musical interests into a sound that, while it is firmly rooted in rock n’ roll, is not afraid to venture into other categories of popular music to find it’s purpose.

John says, “He’s a Stones guy, and I’m a Beatles guy. He likes stripped down production, soulful, if unpolished, vocals, and a solid back beat. I like big production, precise, challenging vocals, and intricate rhythms. There’s a musical tension between us that permeates our writing and, I think, makes magic happen. I wouldn’t change his philosophy if I could.”

John’s younger brother, Ron, stepped in to play bass for the band for a couple of years, and gave the band what it desperately needed: a taste of playing in front of an audience. Though his path in life has led him a different way, he will always be a member of Crossing Oceans. His eternal membership was earned by crossing an ocean of great resistance to be with and help his family and this band at a time in his life when he was faced with a great many hardships and challenges of his own. In another time and place, he would still be actively helping to steer our course.

Stones? Beatles? Who’s That? Are they anything like Seether?

Frank was 10 years old when John and Walter began having jam sessions.

He was walking around in diapers when John left his previous band in Reno, and moved to the East Coast.

He wasn’t even born when John took the stage with his first band, Ro-Sham-Bo.

He’s 8 months younger than John’s first daughter.

He completely missed the 70’s and 80’s, and doesn’t remember a whole lot about the 90’s!

Those are some fun facts, but as far as the band is concerned, that’s all they are: simple, fun facts. They mean absolutely nothing when you look at the level of talent, promise, energy, enthusiasm and maturity Frank displays.

He was Crossing Oceans’ first and most dedicated fan. He’s actually listened repeatedly to the songs we’ve posted on MySpace (now My_, or something like that). How many of you can say that? Come on? We know better…remember, there are “play counts” on there! He was always front-and-center at our performances. He learned to play our stuff on his guitar, and always treated us as comrades who shared a common love for music.

When we found ourselves without a bass player last year, he bravely offered his services, even though he currently heads up his own band, Darkin, playing guitar, writing, and singing for this young and focused band. With barely a moment of pause to consider the differences in age, John and Walter embraced the opportunity to play with someone so driven to work at his craft.

After just a couple of practices, the generation gap was forgotten. It was an easy ocean to cross, given his natural talent and good humor. He’s added a fresh gust of wind to Crossing Oceans’ sails, and his story is just beginning to unfold.

Oceans Crossed:

Music is an emotional experience that touches everyone in some way. The performers and the types of music they play define moments in time, shape our thinking, drive fashion, and influence future music enthusiasts. There would be no Bullet For My Valentine without Metallica, no Metallica without Black Sabbath, no Sabbath without the Beatles and Stones, and no Beatles and Stones without Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly and Bill Haley. Even they would not have done what they did without the contributions of blues men like Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters…and yes, they got their ideas from someone before them too.

Music has united countless people across deep and broad oceans of experience and culture. It is the bond by which the members of Crossing Oceans have come together as friends. As they look to create and perform new music, they tap into the work that has come before to fuel their inspirations. They continue to expand their boundaries, trying with each new song to cross great voids in musical interests while fulfilling their own personal sense of what sounds good, and hopefully, creating a song that is unique to Crossing Oceans.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Band Origins

The band’s name, Crossing Oceans, is reflective of the diversity of its members and the vast number of musical styles their music echoes. Oceans are crossed physically, generationally, and philosophically to build this band and this sound.

Physically:

John and Frank are bound to the East Coast of the Continental U.S. by birth. Walter arrived in the U.S. from the Netherlands in 2003. Shortly after his arrival in America, he was invited, through a friend-of-a-friend, to a birthday party at John’s house, where he met and hit it off with John’s sister-in-law. It wasn’t long before he began frequenting all family functions at her side.

After some conversations centered on shared interests, John and Walter began exploring a mutual interest in playing music in late 2004, messing around with some covers on the guitar and drums in John’s basement. After many months of weekly jam sessions, they decided that the relationship should be defined, and that meant committing to the idea that they were, in fact, in a band together. That was a scary proposition for a couple of thirty-something bankers, but they decided that their efforts deserved a name and some goals. A couple of late-night burger-n-brew sessions later, they had an epiphany. Why not “Crossing Oceans”? Walter had crossed the Atlantic and joined a band, so it seemed fitting. Turns out, the name would take on many more meanings, revealed through time.

Philosophically:

Ro-Sham-Bo. Satellite Green. Francis The Pig.

Any of these band names sound familiar? Hit the “Like” button now to make your presence known!

We’re hearing crickets over here.

Anyone?

C’est la vie.

Chances are, unless you are part of a VERY select group of people who share a time and place in Reno Nevada’s history, you’ll draw a blank, but a few people might remember that John played in a couple of bands during his time living there before forming Crossing Oceans.

Growing up, he fantasized about being on the drummer’s throne for KISS, Van Halen, Ozzy, Rush, Yes, Genesis, Queen, or Jethro Tull, living the rock n’ roll lifestyle, traveling the globe. He loves stage lights, big amplifiers, smoke machines, pyrotechnics, groupies, roadies, obnoxiously large drum kits, flashy guitars and screaming fans.

A taste of the stage has always left John wanting more, but the struggles of life have led him down a different, more practical path for many years.

Enter Walter. He was not an obvious choice to fill the gap in John’s musical void. Though they shared a short list of common favorite pop/rock songs, Walter’s tastes are more rooted in the folk/philosopher approach to music. He likes the idea of playing his acoustic guitar around a campfire, serenading friends under the star light, or reclining in the bow of a sailboat, the wind in his hair, and a guitar pick in his hand. During his journey through life, he’s acquired a taste for Latin and Caribbean rhythms, though he’s always harbored a curiosity for the nuances of an electric guitar.

Though the fusion of musical tastes did not begin immediately, they both shared a love for playing, and were both easy going, preferring to smile and laugh over a few beers rather than butting heads and competing for the title of “Rock God of the Universe”.

It was a slow, organic process, with many moments of doubt, but what finally emerged was an amalgamation of two diverse musical interests into a sound that, while it is firmly rooted in rock n’ roll, is not afraid to venture into other categories of popular music to find it’s purpose.

John says, “He’s a Stones guy, and I’m a Beatles guy. He likes stripped down production, soulful, if unpolished, vocals, and a solid back beat. I like big production, precise, challenging vocals, and intricate rhythms. There’s a musical tension between us that permeates our writing and, I think, makes magic happen. I wouldn’t change his philosophy if I could.”

John’s younger brother, Ron, stepped in to play bass for the band for a couple of years, and gave the band what it desperately needed: a taste of playing in front of an audience. Though his path in life has led him a different way, he will always be a member of Crossing Oceans. His eternal membership was earned by crossing an ocean of great resistance to be with and help his family and this band at a time in his life when he was faced with a great many hardships and challenges of his own. In another time and place, he would still be actively helping to steer our course.

Stones? Beatles? Who’s That? Are they anything like Seether?

Frank was 10 years old when John and Walter began having jam sessions.

He was walking around in diapers when John left his previous band in Reno, and moved to the East Coast.

He wasn’t even born when John took the stage with his first band, Ro-Sham-Bo.

He’s 8 months younger than John’s first daughter.

He completely missed the 70’s and 80’s, and doesn’t remember a whole lot about the 90’s!

Those are some fun facts, but as far as the band is concerned, that’s all they are: simple, fun facts. They mean absolutely nothing when you look at the level of talent, promise, energy, enthusiasm and maturity Frank displays.

He was Crossing Oceans’ first and most dedicated fan. He’s actually listened repeatedly to the songs we’ve posted on MySpace (now My_, or something like that). How many of you can say that? Come on? We know better…remember, there are “play counts” on there! He was always front-and-center at our performances. He learned to play our stuff on his guitar, and always treated us as comrades who shared a common love for music.

When we found ourselves without a bass player last year, he bravely offered his services, even though he currently heads up his own band, Darkin, playing guitar, writing, and singing for this young and focused band. With barely a moment of pause to consider the differences in age, John and Walter embraced the opportunity to play with someone so driven to work at his craft.

After just a couple of practices, the generation gap was forgotten. It was an easy ocean to cross, given his natural talent and good humor. He’s added a fresh gust of wind to Crossing Oceans’ sails, and his story is just beginning to unfold.

Oceans Crossed:

Music is an emotional experience that touches everyone in some way. The performers and the types of music they play define moments in time, shape our thinking, drive fashion, and influence future music enthusiasts. There would be no Bullet For My Valentine without Metallica, no Metallica without Black Sabbath, no Sabbath without the Beatles and Stones, and no Beatles and Stones without Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly and Bill Haley. Even they would not have done what they did without the contributions of blues men like Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters…and yes, they got their ideas from someone before them too.

Music has united countless people across deep and broad oceans of experience and culture. It is the bond by which the members of Crossing Oceans have come together as friends. As they look to create and perform new music, they tap into the work that has come before to fuel their inspirations. They continue to expand their boundaries, trying with each new song to cross great voids in musical interests while fulfilling their own personal sense of what sounds good, and hopefully, creating a song that is unique to Crossing Oceans.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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