Crossway ESV Bible Atlas and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$37.14
Qty:1
  • List Price: $55.00
  • Save: $17.86 (32%)
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Crossway ESV Bible Atlas has been added to your Cart
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $21.87
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Crossway ESV Bible Atlas Hardcover – June 10, 2010


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$37.14
$37.14 $29.99

Frequently Bought Together

Crossway ESV Bible Atlas + Joshua: No Falling Words (Focus on the Bible)
Price for both: $49.08

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Crossway (June 10, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1433501929
  • ISBN-13: 978-1433501920
  • Product Dimensions: 11.9 x 9.3 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #109,143 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

This work is an introduction to the geography of the biblical world and an extension of the maps and other geographical information found in the ESV Study Bible (Crossway, 2008). The first of four parts provides an overview of the land in which the Israelites settled and a description of the relationship between archaeology and biblical studies. The second addresses the places and events mentioned in the books of the Bible. In this part, for example, the story of the exodus of the Hebrews from Egypt is not only described but also illustrated with a map showing the traditional route scholars believe they took as well as three alternatives and photographs of Mt. Sinai, where it is traditionally located. Part 3 is a collection of maps that spans the whole of Bible history and ranges geographically from Anatolia to North Africa. Part 4 provides various appendixes and indexes, such as a time line of biblical history, a general index, a scripture index, and an index of known biblical sites. Finally, a CD-ROM accompanies the atlas, providing digital versions of the historical maps. The ESV in the title refers to the English Standard Version of the Bible. First published in 2001, it strives to be an essentially literal translation from a team committed to historic Christian orthodoxy. It would be safe to assume the conservative-Evangelical stance of that translation will also be found in the information presented in this atlas. Recommended for theological and research libraries as well as libraries with strong collections in biblical archaeology. --Christopher McConnell

Review

“A remarkably beautiful and rich resource for historical, geographical, and archaeological background material that will deepen our understanding of each section of the Bible and increase our appreciation of the Bible's amazing historical accuracy.”
Wayne Grudem, Research Professor of Theology and Biblical Studies, Phoenix Seminary

“This Atlas is a wonderfully illustrated tool to aid the layperson, student of the Scripture, or pastor who wants to dig deeper and gain new insights and appreciation of the setting, context, and message of the Bible. The text is easy to follow, pictures are brilliant, and maps are incredibly useful as the reader moves through the related narratives. I highly recommend this marvelous resource.”
James K. Hoffmeier, Professor of Old Testament & Near Eastern Archaeology, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

“During the 44 years I served as a college professor I used many good atlases. However, I have never seen one comparable to this in the breadth of material, the depth of coverage, and the outstanding quality of its impressive and abundantly illustrated maps and photos of Bible lands.”
John McRay, Professor Emeritus of New Testament and Archaeology, Wheaton College Graduate School, Wheaton, IL

“I had the privilege of being involved in the production of drawings based on the latest research for the ESV Study Bible. It is a joy to see these drawings plus the original ESV Study Bible maps, woven together with numerous new maps, brilliantly evocative photographs and useful indexes to make up the new Crossway Bible Atlas. This volume will become an indispensable companion for Bible students, fulfilling every expectation you might have of such a tool. Particularly innovative is the use of terrain imagery to facilitate the reader’s understanding of such Biblical viewpoints as that of Abraham from Hebron over the cities of the plain or Moses from Mt. Nebo.”
Leen Ritmeyer, Archaeological Consultant


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
2
1 star
0
See all 14 customer reviews
I've always enjoyed maps.
Joshua Schwisow
Most of the others are smaller, but they fit nicely on a page, and look very good and readable.
DR-J-J
While the maps and photos are wonderful, this volume is more than just a book of maps.
Patti Chadwick

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 47 people found the following review helpful By DR-J-J TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 14, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Having seen the detailed reviews of several others, I wanted to focus on some things that teachers/pastors/or strong lay leaders might be interested in. How does the ESV Bible Atlas compare to other wonderful Bible Atlases? How usable is it?

The Crossway ESV Bible Atlas is a marvelous resource. I would be shocked that anyone would ever rate it lower than a 4 star resource. I gave it 5. But I noticed that if you read the reviews for the other major Bible atlases, that you see similar reviews. They all tout how marvelous this and that atlas is and how it is the one to buy. So, how does the ESV Bible Atlas stack up? What are strength and weaknesses? How about teaching resources?

As a teacher, let me point out two key things that make this Bible Atlas stand out: the ESV includes a CD with digital maps and searchable indexes, and, in addition, a removable, 17 x 22-inch map of Palestine. The wall map is very nice, but probably too small to be considered a "wall map." Still, very nice. (It is inside the back cover). The CD-ROM is worth the price of the book by itself. It is highly useful, and unlike one other reviewer, I thought the resolutions are wonderful. No, you don't get the high-def brilliant images that are in part 4 of the book, but you can easily print (note: I am not saying you should) an 8x10 or larger copy and you will not notice any poor image quality.

The CD-ROM:
As a teacher, I can imagine using these images in a PowerPoint presentation or on a hand-out. They are wonderful. So, the question becomes, is that permissible? I couldn't find a direct answer, but many reviewers have said that this can be done. Several bloggers mention, "These maps can be easily added to Powerpoint for use in the classroom.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Joshua Schwisow on July 31, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I've always enjoyed maps. This is most clearly evident in my early childhood and pre-teen years. It began with drawing maps of fantasy lands and the drawing of battles upon maps of the world collected free from the library. I fondly remember asking my Grandma for a Webster's Geographical Dictionary and promptly receiving the volume for my birthday which sits on my shelf to this day. For a time, I even contemplated putting up "map-of-the-world" wallpaper on the walls of my bedroom and bathroom. Though I have moved on to other subjects of interest I still enjoy looking at maps and putting historical events in their geographical context. It was therefore with great excitement that I opened up the newly released ESV Bible Atlas from Crossway. I am a user of the ESV translation and I have greatly appreciated the work Crossway has done with this translation, especially with last years ESV Study Bible which is a very helpful (and hefty!) volume.

Geography is a very important area of study but takes on a special importance when geography is intimately involved with the events that took place in the Word of God. It is in time and place in which the revelation of God took place through history. The Biblical interpreter should have an intimate understanding of the geographical and historical conditions surrounding the events of Scripture. In this regard, the ESV Bible Atlas is an indispensable tool for doing historical and geographical research. The atlas has four sections:

Part 1: This section is an introduction and overview of the Biblical world providing historical information in the text regarding the surrounding lands and customs of these ancient peoples.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Daniel M. Wright on July 30, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The ESV BIBLE ATLAS is an exquisite, well-crafted and accessible volume. The level of detail and the quality of the maps make this a very useful tool for "getting it right" when attempting to place biblical events in their proper location and context. This hard cover edition has significant weight and size, while not being too cumbersome.

There is a pull-out, physical map of the land of "Palestine" in full color that is nice, but a little small.

Along with the usual writings and maps one would expect, this atlas contains a number of historic illustrations of ancient architecture and particularly a series that shows Jerusalem's growth over time; with the development of the subsequent Holy Temples there. Archaeologist and temple mount historian, Leen Ritmeyer, was an adviser on this atlas project and his team had a significant hand in the development of these scholarly illustrations. They look exquisite!

For me, the only disappointment with this atlas was the promised CD inside the back cover. The disc contained a simple HTML file with links to low-resolution maps in chronological/biblical order. Pretty good for quick study, but I was hoping for a little more bang for the buck!

Four Stars! All-in-all a refreshing and accurate book that will assist many in learning more about the Bible.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Debbie TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 22, 2010
Format: Hardcover
"Crossway ESV Bible Atlas" is a Bible atlas. The lovely, full-color photographs of the regions, city ruins, and archaeological artifacts were one of the strongest points of this atlas. I also loved the full-color artist reconstructions of various buildings and places based on archaeological findings or the descriptions in the Bible. These illustrations included: ziggurats; Ur at the time of Abram; the Tabernacle; Jericho; Jerusalem at the time of David; Jerusalem at the time of Solomon; Solomon's Temple; the city of Nineveh; Jerusalem at the time of Hezekiah; the city of Babylon; Zerubbabel's Temple; Jerusalem at the time of Nehemiah; at time of Jesus: Jerusalem, the Temple Mount, the Temple, a fishing boat, Golgotha and temple mount, and a tomb; at the time of Paul: Philippi, Corinth, Ephesus, Rome, and the synagogue at Gamin.

There were also 3D "viewpoint" maps, like what Abraham would have seen of the Jordan Valley when Sodom, Gomorrah, and the other two cities were destroyed. Since the elevation was indicated with similar shades of green, some of these 3D Old Testament maps required some studying to understand. However, the New Testament 3D maps used more colors and so were easier to "see."

The maps were mainly flat maps (no elevation given) that showed the cities, rivers, and known ancient international and intra-national roads with the biblical movements indicated over them. Overall, the maps effectively conveyed the information when combined with the text in the captions. However, the underlying features (roads and rivers) were indicated with a gray dotted or solid line.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?