Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (English Subtitled) 2000 PG-13

Amazon Instant Video

(1,403) IMDb 7.9/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime
Watch Trailer

An epic set against the breathtaking landscapes of ancient China, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon combines the exhilarating martial arts choreography by Yuen Wo-Ping (The Matrix) with the sensitivity and classical storytelling of an Ang Lee film. The result is something truly unexpected: romantic, emotionally powerful entertainment.

Starring:
Yun-Fat Chow, Michelle Yeoh
Runtime:
2 hours 1 minute

Available to watch on supported devices.

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (English Subtitled)

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, International, Action
Director Ang Lee
Starring Yun-Fat Chow, Michelle Yeoh
Supporting actors Ziyi Zhang, Chen Chang, Sihung Lung, Pei-pei Cheng, Fa Zeng Li, Xian Gao, Yan Hai, De Ming Wang, Li Li, Su Ying Huang, Jin Ting Zhang, Rei Yang, Kai Li, Jian Hua Feng, Zhen Xi Du, Cheng Lin Xu, Feng Lin, Wen Sheng Wang
Studio Sony Pictures Classics
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Excellent acting, great storyline, and very awesome action scenes.
B. Duff
Director Ang Lee created, perhaps, the most cinematically beautiful, and dramatic martial arts film ever made with "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon".
M. Hart
To me, it feels like any other movie that I will watch in the future after seeing CTHD will totally ... (hehe).
Jen is my ex girlfriend.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

104 of 109 people found the following review helpful By E. Garcia on November 24, 2010
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I have the DVD version and saw this movie in the theater too. Recently I got the Blu-ray version. The subtitles of the Blu-ray are very suspicious. They are significantly different from the DVD/theater. Why is that? Also, the subtitle translation for Blu-ray seem very "Americanized", as if the studio wanted to make it more accessible, perhaps, to U.S. audiences. But having got used to the DVD subtitles, and not speaking Chinese, I can't say the subtitles for the DVD or Blu-ray are correct or not, or that one is better than the other.

Example: The scene where Jen meets and fights with Li Mu Bai for the first time. Jen executes a move that astonishes Mu Bai, who exclaims "Jade Fox can't be your master. Where did you learn the 'Xuan Piu' move?". Jen's response in the DVD: "I'm just playing around". The blu-ray: "Piece of cake." Now which reply by Jen seems more realistic for that time period, in that part of the world? It seems more likely that Jen would say she's just playing around, or improvising. There are two English translations on Blu ray, and they give the same translation, so there's no hunting for the "better" version on Blu-ray.

Throughout the Blu ray, there are many differences in translation compared to the dvd to make one wonder: which version is more correct, given that something is always "lost in translation" from one language to another? These are glaring differences. What's on the Blu-ray is very different from the DVD, and just feels wrong. Anyone else notice this?
12 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
262 of 297 people found the following review helpful By Allen D Sabio on February 12, 2001
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is simply a masterpiece. A brilliant film with great performances by its stars, Michelle Yeoh, Chow yun fat, and especially Zhang Ziyi. Director Ang Lee along with his choreographer tell this epic story in a stunning and creative visual way that makes this film one of the greatest ever made. The action scenes in this film are jaw dropping, and are unmatched by any action film ever made. Along with the action, is a great story and great characters that reflect influences from Lord of the Rings, and parallel the Jedi of the Star Wars trilogy, but remain consistent with the eastern culture and philosophy which permeates throughout the story. In fact, the main characters, especially Jen, portrayed by the talented Zhang Ziyi , seem to question that philosophy and culture throughout the film, almost rebelling against it. This is foreshadowed in the beginning of the film when Yun-fat's character describes how his meditation leads him to a place of sorrow instead of enlightenment. In a later scene, Yeoh 's character questions the buddhist teaching of Fat's character in relation to their suppressed love, pointing out the touch of her hand is real,not an illusion, even though it is of this world. However it is also the discipline of this eastern spirituality that gives these knights their power. the main character Jen, abuses this power, along with the power given to her when she posesses the Green Destiny, a magical and powerful sword, owned by the wizard -like, or jedi- like, character portrayed by Chow Yun-Fat. The Green Destiny, much like the ring of power in lord of the rings, or the force in Star Wars, becomes a power that threatens to consume Jen. Throughout the film , Jen rebels against the traditions of the easten culture and philosophy.Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
113 of 126 people found the following review helpful By Daniel McInnis on February 22, 2001
Being as I'm Irish and extremely stubborn, I hate to admit when I'm wrong but in two prior reviews I referred to American Psycho as "the best movie of the early 21st century," and of Gladiator's Oscar hopes I proclaimed it would be "a more than worthy recipient." As it turns out I must recant both of these statements because as of the date they were written I had yet to see the Ang Lee masterpiece Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. It's a film so exquisite that to compare it to even the best of our American movies would be downright insulting.
Chow Yun-Fat stars as a legendary warrior preparing for retirement, presumably to settle down and start a family with the sister of his slain master Shu Lien (Michelle Yoeh). And though their love for eachother is obvious from on the onset, they can't quite summon the courage to speak of their hidden passion. So Lu Mu Bai (Yun-Fat), unalbe to express himself to Lien, entrusts her with a sacred sword that's to be passed on to a friend, symbolic of his retirement from rouge life. She willingly obliges only to have the sword stolen that very night by a masked intruder. It's then that we're treated to our first of many fight sequences, so breathtakingly fluent in their beauty that they are literally awe inspiring.
Our masked intruder is later revealed to us as being the daughter to the governor, Jen, whose martial arts training has been repressed by her family because of her sex. Despite this she finds training from Jade Fox, a corrupt disciple of Bai's master whose death he's sworn to avenge, as is customary in their culture. So the battle lines are drawn, from which the story unfolds, but Lee doesn't bother labeling his characters as "good guys" and "bad guys.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again