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Crow Dog: Four Generations of Sioux Medicine Men Paperback – January 18, 1996


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (January 18, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060926821
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060926823
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.3 x 1.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #409,632 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In January 1890, Leonard Crow Dog's great-grandfather, Jerome Crow Dog, surrendered to the U.S. Army; he was the last of the ghost dancers, who brought a "new way of praying, of relating to the spirits." Ninety-three years later, Leonard Crow Dog revived the ghost dance at Wounded Knee. From childhood he was destined to be a medicine man; he recounts family history through four generations?Jerome was the first Native American to win a case in the Supreme Court; Leonard's father, Henry, introduced peyote to the Lakota Sioux. He details tribal ceremonies and their meanings. By 1971, Leonard Crow Dog had become spiritual leader of the American Indian Movement. In that role and also as medicine man, he was present at the 1972 march on Washington and the siege of Wounded Knee in 1973. With Richard Erdoes (Lakota Woman), he gives a stirring account of both events?a horror story of government brutality and vindictiveness, of prejudice and injustice. Here he offers an illuminating introduction to Sioux culture. Photos not seen by PW. $30,000 ad/promo; author tour.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Here is another addition to Erdoes's autobiographical collaborations with Native Americans that blend oral tradition with Western linear history (Crying for a Dream: The World Through Native American Eyes, LJ 2/1/90). Through the experiences of this family of great medicine men, readers are taken on an intimate journey through 120 years of Lakota history. Events that will already be familiar to some readers are recounted within a moving spiritual framework, replete with descriptions of the ceremonial rites and daily spiritual life characteristic of what the outside world deems Native American culture. We witness through "spiritual eyes" the beginnings of the controversial Native American Church, the Ghost Dance, the American Indian Movement, reservation life, and the "ethnic genocide" of the Indian boarding school system. Most libraries will want this volume to stand alongside Lakota Woman (LJ 2/15/90) and Gift of Power: The Life and Teachings of a Lakota Medicine Man (Bear & Co., 1992), similar titles by Erdoes.?Bruce Alan Hanson, Wayzata East J.H.S. Lib., Minn.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 22 customer reviews
This is a great book that could be out of print soon.
C. Evans
A must read for anyone interested in Native American culture, ceremony or history.
Tyler R
This book goes in-depth in the religious aspects of Native Americans.
Pantherblck6

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By "zarings3" on February 6, 2001
Format: Paperback
In the beginning paragraph it says, "We are still making history." as Crow Dog explains his family roots. That sentence sums up the book for me. It is history. The history that is learned and not lost by Crow Dog. The ceremonies and native ways that he is trying to maintain and to pass on are intricately described. I don't think I have read a book that is so visually written. I could picture the things he described. I savored this book for a few months, letting each chapter sink in. Although the book is written in a simple manner there is nothing simple about the information shared. A great read!
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
With the abundant help of Richard Erdoes, Leonard Crowdog gives us the history of his people and their never-ending battle for freedom in a white world that was once theirs. I highly recomend this book for people interrested in reading about the injustices loaded onto the Native American people since the arrival of white men on their land.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Pantherblck6 on March 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
Crow Dog is one of the best Native American books I've ever read. It is culturally rich and speaks clearly on the injustices done to the Native Americans. It talks not only about the injustices of the past but also the future, like the siege of Wounded Knee. Also this is one of the richest stories which covers the legacy of the Crow Dogs.

One of the reasons this book is so affluent is its personal feel. The author, Leonard Crow Dog, can't write and so he spoke the entire book to an interpreter. This gives the entire book a slow but fluent feel which shadows the way many Native Americans talk, and so the book feels, sometimes, like a story. It makes you feel you are there in every event, and you are connected with the book in an uncanny way.

This book goes in-depth in the religious aspects of Native Americans. The Crow Dog family has always been in the root of Lakota medicine men, and they are responsible for the continued practice of, and the creation of some, Native American rituals. Leonard Crow Dog, the author, was the first to bring back the banded Ghost Dance since the death of his Great-Grand Father. It happened at one of the most important sites in Native American history, Wounded Knee. However, this wouldn't be the last time Leonard Crow Dog would become history at Wounded Knee.

The siege of Wounded Knee, which lasted seventy-two days, is one of the most intense events of the book. In that short time a band of Native Americans, from a rainbow of tribes, raised an independent nation, defended that nation, and fell to an enemy whom had, or maybe more has, no sense of a kept word. The siege of Wounded Knee wasn't actually a siege because the land was a part of a treaty which said it'd be Native American land, but naturally the white man didn't keep their word.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By C-real Productions Cyrille Autin on November 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
THE FIRST PART OF THE BOOK IS INCREDIBLE ENLIGHTNING GUIDANCE THROUGH THE RITES, CULTURE AND LIFE OF THE AUTHOR. THEN WE MOVE INTO RECENT HISTORY WITH THE CREATION OF AIM ITS STRUGGLE AND AMAZING VICTORIES; TO MOVE ON WITH PROSECUTION PERSECUTION TORTURE OF THE PEOPLE WHO FOUGHT AND DIE FOR THEIR CULTURE AND ARE STILL FIGHTING TODAY FOR THE RIGHT TO BE WHO THEY ARE. (RESPECT!)

WHEN CROW DOG DESCRIBE HIS JAIL TIME IT IS SO REALISTIC AND SENSITIVE YOU FEEL YOU ARE THERE INSIDE HIM AND THE WALLS, BUT WHEN YOU SHARE HIS FINAL FEAR: YOU ARE BREATHLESS ABOUT TO CHOKE!

ALL THIS HAD TO END UP IN A SUN DANCE.

A WONDERFUL BOOK WHICH SHOULD BE INTO EVERY LIBRARY, BOOKSTORES AND MOST DEFINETELY ON YOUR BOOK SHELVES.

1 HEART!

C
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Joan P. Vaughan on July 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
Interesting contemporary information (i.e. 1950s on). Tells of Indian's on-going plight in poverty, alcoholism, disease and lack of employment and the feelings this engenders in them. Valuable history of past Holy Men (and women) and their values.

Since I am very interested in Indian studies, both past and present, I enjoyed this book.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By "vroniber" on October 19, 2001
Format: Paperback
Leonard Crow Dog tells his family history and the history of his nation with a love and power which can almost overpowers the reader.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By C. Evans on September 8, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found this book useful as I study Native American medicine and Native Medicine people. The book gives some insight as to who Crow Dog is and some of his gifts and abilities, it helps one see who he is. This is a great book that could be out of print soon. Get a copy while you can, you won't be disappointed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Juan Carlos Ibarra P on December 19, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have met uncle Crow Dog. I have heard him sing. I have followed his lead while Sundancing. However, only after reading this book I can fully understand the extent of his legacy and the depth of the honor of having been a small part of his dream of peace and love for all men.
We have created a very sick society, there are many ideas and words in this book to inspire whoever wants to make a difference.
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