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Crow Hardcover – October 31, 2010


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 5 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - Kindergarten
  • Hardcover: 30 pages
  • Publisher: Clavis (October 31, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1605370711
  • ISBN-13: 978-1605370712
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 0.4 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,941,371 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1–A large black crow is rejected by smaller, more colorful birds for being too scary. When he paints his feathers to resemble each of them in turn, he ends up creeping out the little birds even more. Finch, Parakeet, and Chickadee are ultimately relieved to see the big black crow who they think has frightened away the strange-looking newcomers, and they form a friendship with him based on this assumption. Between the friendship based on a lie, the equating of black with bad, Crow's self-esteem problem, and the awkward translation, the only thing this book has going for it is the attractive art. The vibrant and expressive acrylic cartoons on clean white backgrounds are eye-catching and exciting. However, the illustrations don't compensate for the story's negative messages and thin humor.Heidi Estrin, Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL
© Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

In this simple yet inventive—and beautifully illustrated—lesson about prejudice imported from Belgium, big, black, scary Crow is the odd man out in a place where all the other birds seem petite and brightly feathered. Crow tries to fit in by painting his feathers to resemble the others but instead scares them off. When Crow’s tears wash away the paint, making him black again, three birds approach, mistakenly believing that his impersonations were hideous birds and that Crow has scared them off. The three become Crow’s instant friends. The luminescent illustrations in vivid acrylics featuring Crow and the colorful birds against stark white backgrounds create an eye-catching crispness that will draw readers into the charming story. Combine with Chris Raschka’s Little Black Crow (2010), also about a goofy-looking black bird that doesn’t fit in, or try Raschka’s Yo! Yes? (1993) for a different take on prejudice. Preschool-Grade 2. --Randall Enos

Customer Reviews

Talk about being not so subtle, right?
Oblio
Ah, well, I couldn't destroy a book with such a cute story behind these wonderful illustrations, so we'll move onto that.
FIRR-Kids!
I must admit however that I just don't get it.
J.Prather

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By J.Prather TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 27, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Crow has received glowing reviews from such esteemed publications as Publishers Weekly who lauds it as being a thoughtful story told with polish and style. I was expecting a story showing the dangers of prejudice and loving yourself for who you are. I must admit however that I just don't get it. Crow creeps along his telephone wire and attempts to make friends with a trio of multi colored birds. The Birds then squeak "Black! He's pitch-black from top to toe." "He's not to be trusted." "Brr, must be a mean creature." I found these lines disturbing and immediately realized that I would not be comfortable using this book as a group read aloud. I was still expecting a good resolution to the story, even after our poor crow then despairs, calling himself a "creep" and a "scarecrow of tar and feathers."

Crow then decides to set to work painting his feathers to look like our trio of multi colored birds. He's not successful in winning over new friends though, since the little birds are now scared of the birds he's pretending to be. When his tears wash away the paint, the little birds recognize him as the Crow and are excited because he scared the other birds away with his "burly black beak and your dark feathers." I was expecting something like oh, we shouldn't have judged you by your appearance, or black isn't scary after all. What I got was just a picture of all the birds flying off together. I think maybe the author was trying to point out that the color of the bird didn't matter, they were all scary... but this one just didn't leave me with a good feeling. I didn't like the language at all, and I can't help but feel that if I didn't get it, then 4 to 5 year olds won't get it either.

I will say that the illustrations here are quite spectacular. I just wish the story would have been more satisfying. Not a recommend.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By FIRR-Kids! on December 13, 2010
Format: Hardcover
If it wouldn't completely destroy it, I would just tear this book apart in seconds. Not because I don't care for it, but because I would absolutely love to have some of these illustrations framed and hung on my walls. Leo Timmers is such a genius with his illustrations. Gimme, gimme. Ah, well, I couldn't destroy a book with such a cute story behind these wonderful illustrations, so we'll move onto that.

Crow is a friendly, fun bird. In spite of his personality, he is also one of the loneliest birds around. Sure, he's as friendly as they come, but the other birds won't get close enough to discover that for themselves. Crow sports jet black feathers, with a very large, curved black beak, black legs and a tuft of black feathers at the tip of his noggin. The other birds are positive that a creature as dark as this must have a black heart to match, and so they flee from him with pounding hearts.

Crow feels sad and depressed about his appearance, so he hatches a plan and quickly gathers the necessary supplies. He paints his feathers blue and yellow so that he looks just like a finch! When that fails, Crow breaks out the pail of green and becomes a parakeet. And finally, he uses gray and pink to make himself look like a chickadee. With each new bird "costume" the other birds still flee. Poor Crow cries so hard that all the paint washes clear away.

Now that he has returned to his usual black visage, the other birds flock to him ... to say thanks. They are grateful that his grim appearance chased away "that hideous chickadee, that scary parakeet and that creepy finch." Crow's plan did work, in a roundabout way.

So, yes, in addition to the loveliness of the art, there are several good messages wrapped up in here.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Berry on August 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Sadly we purchased this book for our adopted kiddos, hoping it wuld be a story about accepting who you are. Instead it is a book that has lines such as the birds then squeak "Black! He's pitch-black from top to toe." "He's not to be trusted." Sadly in the end Crow is accepted because he scared away "other" birds with his "Burly black beak and dark feathers." Just not a message you want to send to children. The pictures are beautiful, but the author clearly did not think how this story wuld come across to anyone of color. Sending it back.
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