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  • Crucial m4 128GB mSATA Internal Solid State Drive CT128M4SSD3
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Crucial m4 128GB mSATA Internal Solid State Drive CT128M4SSD3

by Crucial

Available from these sellers.
128GB
  • Powerful SSD performance in a tiny mSATA form factor
  • Ultrathin form factor provides lightweight mobility
  • Features blazing-fast speeds - up to 500MB/s Sequential Reads, 175MB/s Sequential Write
  • Treats compressed and uncompressed files the same, resulting in consistently fast speeds. Validated for Intel Smart Response technology
  • Available in 32GB, 64GB, 128GB, and 256GB
1 used from $129.99


Product Details

Capacity: 128GB
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 2.1 x 0.7 inches ; 0.8 ounces
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces
  • Shipping: This item is also available for shipping to select countries outside the U.S.
  • ASIN: B0085J17KA
  • Item model number: CT128M4SSD3
  • Batteries 1 C batteries required.
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (217 customer reviews)
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: June 7, 2012

Product Description

Capacity: 128GB

The Crucial m4 mSATA SSD delivers all of the award-winning performance and reliability of the Crucial m4 SSD - in a drive that's an eighth of the size. Measuring in at about one-third the size of a standard business card (3cm x 5cm), the Crucial m4 mSATA is designed primarily for ultrathin laptop users who want to dramatically increase their system's performance. Because of its small form factor, the Crucial m4 mSATA SSD can do things that hard drives and other SSDs often can't: it can serve as a primary storage device in ultrathin laptops, it can attach directly to the mSATA socket on your system's motherboard (freeing up a hard drive bay), or it can act as a cache to complement the performance of an existing hard drive. Offering lightweight construction, inherent power savings, travel-worthy durability, and validation for Intel Smart Response technology, the Crucial m4 mSATA SSD packs powerful performance in a tiny mSATA form factor.

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Installed very easy, worked great.
Eugene C Martin IV
Easy install, fit perfectly, and even included the correct screws in the package.
Kirsten
There is a known issue with the drives not being recognized after a reboot.
Stephen Furr

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

84 of 88 people found the following review helpful By Jemzor on October 21, 2012
Size Name: 256GB Verified Purchase
I bought the mSATA version of the Crucial M4 mostly for the form factor and have not been disappointed at all. I also bought it for the fact that it's one of, if not THE only mSATA SSD I know that doesn't use compression algorithms (a la SandForce). The Marvell controller here works great and Crucial/Micron have done a fantastic job with their firmware. Just as I received it (about 2 weeks ago) they sent notice of an updated firmware that fixed most all extended use failures that people have been getting in the past. I myself have not had a single problem. As I said in the title, it may not max out the synthetic benchmark programs or have the fastest write specifications on paper but it does have one of the best reliability track records out there and it doesn't use any sort of super over-provisioning or compression to get the job done. It also has one of the most attentive companies backing it and troubleshooting the problems that do arise, so that makes it a true winner in my book. You won't be disappointed in the performance if you're upgrading from any standard platter based HDD. Also, if you're looking for the small form factor and something to plug directly into a desktop motherboard or laptop to save space, it accomplishes that goal for you as well.

For a little background on the hardware, it's been first used in an ASUS Crosshair III Formula motherboard in a SATA II socket through the Syba adapter. Afterwards I transferred it over to a new build on the Maximus V Gene where it directly plugs into the mPCIE expansion bracket (also SATA II). For those interested, it does also work wonderfully of course in the SATA III sockets on the new build which allows for faster read speeds.
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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By MeKoc on January 10, 2013
Size Name: 256GB Verified Purchase
Although this SSD is not listed as one of the compatible SSDs with lenovo ideapad y480 laptop in Crucial's website, I took the risk and well it definitely works! Although at first I thought of buying an SATA3 SSD for my laptop, I later realized it has a vacant mSATA slot and decided to buy this SSD (an SATA3 SSD would require me to remove my HDD since there is only one drive bay in y480 and now with mSATA SSD, I am using both my HDD and SSD).

The SSD arrived with two screws and it took me like 5 minutes to insert the SSD in the PCIe slot. At first boot, the system did not recognize SSD. I opened Device Manager and looked for hardware changes and it did not recognize again. After that, I rebooted the system again. When I opened the Disk Management (can be clicked from the menu Win+X), the SSD was there. I initialized it using quick NTFS format and default unit size. Since my system was pretty new, I didn't want to bother myself with installing everything from scratch. I searched the Net and saw ppl talking about how Paragon Migrate OS to SSD software can seamlessly make the transition from HDD to SSD. My system came with Windows 8 and I discovered only the latest version (v3.0) of Paragon Migrate OS to SSD which costs like $20 supports Win 8. I searched for coupons/promotions and found out that today (01/10/13) Paragon Drive Copy 12 Compact which also supports migration of Win 8 to SSD is offered as a freebie to my luck. I quickly read the Help section (it was actually damn straightforward) and migrated my OS to my new SSD. Then, I restarted my computer and entered BIOS settings by pressing F2 at the boot and moved the SSD up as the first booting device . When the OS booted from the SSD, I opened disk management again and reformatted my HDD not to cause any conflicts.
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37 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Pedro on October 25, 2012
Size Name: 256GB Verified Purchase
There has been an awful lot of bad press about Crucial leaving out a single screw from the the mSata products. This screw is used to secure the module into the laptop. Some clarification is required. Lenovo laptops include this screw in the laptop. No problem, just open it up and there it is where you would expect it to be. It sounds like Dell does not include the screw, maybe other manufacturers don't either. When you think about it, it makes sense that the PC manufacture should supply the screw, especially in a laptop. It is their hardware you are screwing into with very tight spaces. Yes, it is a standard screw, but as a rule, I think it is best the manufacturer of the PC provide that kind of hardware, just as they do for your main disk drives. SO, if you have a Lenovo, you are getting some of your money back for buying a higher end PC. If you bought another brand, you may have to go fish for a screw. you get what you pay for in this case.

Some other issues I see come up, the speed of the mSata being SATAIII. I talked with Lenovo tech support and did my own research. Best I can tell, mSata buses, at least in the Lenovo, only operate at SATA II speed. That said, be careful to look at the various read and write speeds of a given module within given brand. Depending on the number of chips and the controller used on the module, speeds will vary. In the case of crucial, their 256GB module is much faster then the smaller modules.

So, why worry about speed if it is really working at SATAII? Read speeds can quickly saturate the SATAII bus, so there, it is the bus that is the bottleneck. For write speeds, where SSDs are markedly slower, the additional speed in the 256GB module brings the write speed just about to saturation on a SATAII bus.
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