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Cryptography Engineering: Design Principles and Practical Applications Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-0470474242 ISBN-10: 0470474246 Edition: 1st

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Cryptography Engineering: Design Principles and Practical Applications + Applied Cryptography: Protocols, Algorithms, and Source Code in C + Understanding Cryptography: A Textbook for Students and Practitioners
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (March 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470474246
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470474242
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #32,883 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Learn to build cryptographic protocols that work in the real world

Knowing how a camera works does not make you a great photographer. Knowing what cryptographic designs are and how existing cryptographic protocols work does not give you proficiency in using cryptography. You must learn to think like a cryptographer.

That is what this book will teach you. Dive deeply into specific, concrete cryptographic protocols and learn why certain decisions were made. Recognize the challenges and how to overcome them. With this book, which is suitable for both classroom and self-study, you will learn to use cryptography effectively in real-world systems.

  • Understand what goes into designing cryptographic protocols

  • Develop an understanding of the interface between cryptography and the surrounding system, including people, economics, hardware, software, ethics, policy, and other aspects of the real world

  • Look beyond the security protocol to see weaknesses in the surrounding system

  • Thwart the adversary by understanding how adversaries think

  • Learn how to build cryptography into new products

About the Author

Niels Ferguson is a cryptographer for Microsoft who has designed and implemented cryptographic algorithms, protocols, and large-scale security infrastructures.

Bruce Schneier is an internationally renowned security technologist whose advice is sought by business, government, and the media. He is the author of Applied Cryptography, Secrets and Lies, and Schneier on Security.

Tadayoshi Kohno is a professor at the University of Washington. He is known for his research and for developing innovative new approaches to cryptography and computer security education.


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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Great book, you should be ashamed of yourself if you haven't read it!
Keith Makan
It's a "middle ground" book and probably the one you should start with if you are interested in practical cryptography.
Mihailo Despotovic
This book provides a first lesson in pouring some concrete into the walls behind that door.
wiredweird

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Mihailo Despotovic on March 12, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I just got the book, skimmed over it and compared it with the 1st edition (Practical Cryptography).

First of all, if you don't have the 1st edition, this is an excellent buy. It's a "middle ground" book and probably the one you should start with if you are interested in practical cryptography. Then, depending on your interests and needs, you could proceed to a technically and mathematically much deeper (but somewhat obsolete) Applied Cryptography: Protocols, Algorithms, and Source Code in C, Second Edition or to some other direction using the foundation laid down in this book and then getting other book(s) about "hard-core" mathematics of cryptography or about "softer" methods of social engineering and real-life security.

I will now assume you know what the book is all about and that you are considering upgrading it so here are some quick things I hope to help you deciding:

- first of all, obviously, the errata from the 1st edition is incorporated into the text (there is no errata for the 2nd edition yet but keep checking on the book's home page [ [..
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29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By wiredweird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on March 16, 2010
Format: Paperback
It turns out that cryptography is the least of the issues in cryptographic systems. Good codes are available in good implementations all over the place (one reason the authors warn against implementing your own, since good implementations are very hard). But, as the authors say in their introductory chapter, "Cryptography by itself is fairly useless." They liken strong codes in a weak system to a bank-vault door on a tent. This book provides a first lesson in pouring some concrete into the walls behind that door.

Phrased as a text for a one semester graduate or advanced undergrad class, this highly readable text covers a range of basics - the first and most pervasive being the professional paranoia needed to actively seek out ways to defeat your own systems. The authors cover things you might expect in a crypto course, including ciphers, message digests, key exchange, and a smattering of mathematical basics. There's less of the real crypto material than you might think, however. I mean, what good is the unbreakable code when the bad guy with a root kit can read your passwords from the paging file or /dev/kmem? Instead, this book stands out for things like wiping secrets from memory as fast as you can - if you can, if language design or the physics of computer memory even make it possible. Even things like random numbers and the system clock come under careful scrutiny and analysis of their own. The reader who goes through this book cover to cover comes away with a solid appreciation of the hardware, software, and social issues involved in creating truly secure systems.

But, as the authors take pains to state, this is only an introduction. As happened with Schneier's "Applied Cryptography", it could become "...
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Ben Rothke on November 30, 2010
Format: Paperback
Good cryptography can ensure that your data is readable only to authorized parties. The danger of bad cryptography is a false sense of data security. The line between the two is exceptionally thin, and the difference between the two is spelled out in great detail in this text.

The first edition of coauthor Bruce Schneier's Applied Cryptography came out in 1994. What was revolutionary then, and launched a new generation of security mavens, is now obsolete in many parts. Cryptography Engineering is a much-needed update. While not as detailed as the former work, and with significantly fewer code examples, the new text is still a valuable resource for anyone who wants to come up to speed on the essentials of modern cryptography.

The book covers the major uses of cryptography today, namely messaging security and the other fundamental areas including key management, block ciph­ers, block modes, hash functions, encryption modes, message authentication codes, implementation issues, negotiation protocols, and much more.

The three authors bring many decades of unique experience on the topic to the book. Their goal is to get the reader to think like a cryptographer, and the book does a great job of that. It is rich in real-world examples, and each chapter ends with a number of exercises to take the theoretical ideas and put them into practice.

While billed as an introductory text on the subject, Cryptography Engineering is not for the fainthearted. Anyone intrigued by the topic and with the time to dedicate to the matter will find the book worth their while.
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