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Crystallography Made Crystal Clear, Third Edition: A Guide for Users of Macromolecular Models (Complementary Science) Paperback – February 15, 2002

ISBN-13: 978-0125870733 ISBN-10: 0125870736 Edition: 3rd

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Product Details

  • Series: Complementary Science
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Academic Press; 3 edition (February 15, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0125870736
  • ISBN-13: 978-0125870733
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #319,619 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for the first edition
"Well-written...in my opinion is now the best reference for noncrystallographers who want to know more about X-ray diffraction and the data that result from it."
-AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY

Book Description

Expanded and updated edition uses four-color art and concise language to explain the basis of X-ray crystallography

More About the Author

Gale Rhodes provides learning tools in structural biology and bioinformatics at TheMolecularLevel.org.

Customer Reviews

I found this book extremely helpful for understanding the basic concepts of crystallography.
Pablo Power
In crystallography it's very common to find books which deal with either a totally descriptive approach or a totally mathematical approach.
A. Jogalekar
If you want to understand what crystallography is and what crystallographers do, this is the book to read.
Wandering Lab Rat

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
The second edition of Crystallography Made Crystal Clear contains many improvements over the first edition, especially regarding the introduction of new graphics technology available to everyone that can view this webpage on the internet. Rhodes especially explains how the PDB file works and how to view it to best suit the individual scientist's purpose.
It is important to note that the book is still far from "crystal clear"! The portion of the book dealing with the physics of x-ray diffraction is very mysterious--definately dig out the old college physics textbook and read about diffraction when you find yourself confused. Also, the mathematics presented in the middle chapters of the book are way beyond the level that biochemists must deal with on a regular basis. An understanding of multi-variable calculus is important for these chapters.
Overall, the book is a must-read for anyone interested in structural biology, with the exception of several chapters regarding the mathematics that can be skimmed over. And the webpage associated with the book is an excellent resource.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tommy Carstensen on July 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
Buy "Biomolecular Crystallography" instead. This book tries to condense too much information on too few pages. I didn't understand everything in "Biomolecular Crystallography", but the sections that I did understand, are very well written. It's more expensive, but it's a better book, for those that really want to understand crystallography beyond various tutorials on the internet and "Crystallography Made Crystal Clear".
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A. Jogalekar TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is the best introduction to crystallography I have ever come across. Which is quite an achievement because it's a rather complicated subject to study. In crystallography it's very common to find books which deal with either a totally descriptive approach or a totally mathematical approach. Rhodes' book bridges the gap between the two and gives the reader the right dose of jargon and explanation. He illustrates every point with plenty of figures as well as real life computer models of proteins. Before I came across this book, I was struggling and failing to understand Isomorphous Replacement, MAD, Solvent Flattening, Maps and Models, as well as the iterative refining of models. I think no other book comes even close to this book in explaining all these concepts in a simple format. This, I think is as clear as it can get without becoming oversimplified. A must have for all researchers and students whose work is connected to crystallography in any way; this would include crystallographers themselves, biochemists and molecular biologists and computational chemists.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Peter Muller on February 16, 2009
Format: Paperback
While Crystallography made Crystal Clear by Gale Rhodes is certainly easy to read, it oversimplifies things and introduces a few inaccuracies. It falls short to make the student really understand crystallography, which, in my opinion, is not a good thing for a textbook. On the other hand, I have made the experience that, unfortunately, many students are happy with only a superficial knowledge of the basic theory (I have been teaching crystallography for about a decade now) and this book helps with this attitude.

My advice: if you just want to pass the class and don't care about the subject, go with this book. If, however, you really want to understand what crystallography is about, you need to read either the great beginner's book by Werner Massa: Crystal Structure Determination or the more protein crystallography oriented but equally great beginners book by Jenny Glusker and Kenneth Trueblood: Crystal Structure Analysis -- A Primer. Once you have digested the Massa or the Glusker/Trueblood, you can work your way through the book edited by Carmelo Giacovazzo: Fundamentals of Crystallography.

After reading and understanding the Massa or Glusker/Trueblood and the Giacovazzo, you'll be ready to survive a discussion with any crystallographer any time. (What is more: you will enjoy the discussion!) The book by Gale Rhodes, however, will only get you over the exam and you'll miss out on the great fun crystallography can be.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By JP on June 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
When it comes to this field of research, you get two types of references: (1) the 2-5 page quick intro that leaves you with the most basic overview of crystallography and (2) the 'hard core' books that go into such detail as to leave you breathless. This book is, in my opinion, the best transition book.
For non-crystallographers, this book will teach enough about crystallography to allow you to read crystal structure articles and understand what is meant by all of the used statistics and such.
For apprentice crystallographers, this is a wonderful intro into the field. Master the book, then move on to harder books to master it.
Highly recommended. I still go back to it, when I teach people, to help me explain in the way that Gale Rhodes does!
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