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Cuba


Price: $44.95 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Editorial Reviews

Academy AwardÂ(r) winner* Sean Connery (Entrapment) and Brooke Adams (Gas Food Lodging) lead an all-star cast in this sweeping story of two old flames caught up in the chaos, fury and exhilaration of Cuba's revolution. Directed by Richard Lester (A Hard Day's Night) andwritten by Charles Wood (The Charge of the Light Brigade), Cuba is an exciting and "intelligent thriller" (Roger Ebert). Havana, Cuba. 1959. A tropical island paradise is on the brink of revolution. Robert Dapes (Connery), a cynical British mercenary, comes to the country at the request of one of Batista's most corrupt functionaries, General Bello (Martin Balsam). But once there, Dapes finds himself unable to ignore the brutality and depravity of the Batista regimeand unable to resist Alexandra Pulido (Adams), an old lover now married to a wealthy Cuban landowner. Surrounded by volatile guerilla fighters and the human vultures present at all coups, he must come to terms with his shifting views if he has any thought of getting out alive. *1987: Supporting Actor, The Untouchables

Special Features

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Product Details

  • Actors: Sean Connery, Brooke Adams, Jack Weston, Hector Elizondo, Denholm Elliott
  • Directors: Richard Lester
  • Writers: Charles Wood
  • Producers: Alex Winitsky, Arlene Sellers, Denis O'Dell
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, Dubbed, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), Spanish (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • DVD Release Date: April 16, 2002
  • Run Time: 122 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005V9HJ
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #78,982 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Cuba" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

This movie is not well known but is one of Sean Connerys best and is very informative about what happened in Cuba.
John F. Keith
Despite the interesting atmosphere and backstory, the story itself isn't cohesive and there are holes in it big enough to hold one of Batista's white baby grands.
J. Hilles
If your sympathies are with the victims of the dictatorial Batista regime, "Cuba" is an eye into the past.
Celia Redmore

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 2, 2003
Format: DVD
*Cuba* may be the best movie you've never heard of. The setting is 1958, just before the final collapse of the Batista regime. Sean Connery stars as a British mercenary with the odd name of Dapes, whom Batista's colonels hope will help them to stamp out Fidel Castro's revolutionaries. However, Connery pretty much figures out -- almost as soon as he arrives -- that Batista's cause will be lost, and so his attempts to guide the incompetent military are rather half-hearted. He's much more interested in reviving a love affair with an old flame, Brooke Adams (surprisingly glamorous, but with an on-again, off-again accent). Problem is, she's married to the profligate son (Chris Sarandon) of one of Cuba's wealthiest industrialists . . . and it's a lifestyle that rather fits in with her imperial demeanor. (She runs the cigar factory and the rum distillery while her husband gets drunk and chases the skirts of the hired help.) The movie does not pretend to be a terribly accurate account of the Cuban Revolution. What director Richard Lester goes for instead are impressionistic sketches of the land, its people, and its culture. All the stereotypes are here, lovingly rendered: the fat, pompous jefes; the sultry women; the tacky gringo culture superimposed on the place for the visiting American businessmen (one of whom is the always-welcome Jack Weston, in a terrifically sleazy performance); the cigar factories; the prostitutes; the skinny kids playing street baseball; posters of politicos; languid bathers poolside; tropical drinks with the little umbrellas . . . get the idea? The movie succeeds spectacularly in delineating the death-throes of a way of life. Havana in particular seems deserted, denuded of people: even blonde American strippers can't find an audience. *Cuba* is a poignant, and at times funny, daguerreotype of a nation filled with ghosts, just on the cusp of revolution.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Robin Boone on January 7, 2003
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This movie is on any list of my family's 10 favorite movies. We saw it in the theater when it was new, and hoarded the homemade videotape made from a TV broadcast, which was a major event in this household. Finally on DVD - it's wonderful that now we can see it in both widescreen and non.

The film rewards repeated viewing, since eventually you realize that all the comic business ties in with all the main plot lines. I think this mixture of relevant-to-the-plot background comic bits throughout a film must be Richard Lester's forte, since he does it so well in all of his movies. Here the comic bits are superb - there really are no loose ends!

Every character, every actor is wonderful, even the bit parts. Jack Weston gives one of the best performances of his life. The movie lingers in the imagination as THE picture of life at every stratum in Cuba at the end of the 1950s, even though (as has been observed in other reviews) the locations were really in Spain. The colors, the ambience, even the music - wonderful.

It's obvious to me, anyway, that this movie stands the test of time...it has survived to be reborn in DVD format. Thank goodness! - Because it deserves to be remembered and enjoyed.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Celia Redmore on July 21, 2004
Format: DVD
This little gem of a movie hasn't lost its interest 25 years after it was shot. It offers a snapshot of Cuba during the 1959 revolution led by Fidel Castro that replaced the corrupt regime of Fulgencio Batista.

"Cuba" was made at Shepperton Studios, which is less well known than Ealing Studios, but produced a series of high-quality, low-budget films. This semi-documentary showcases Sean Connery as a British soldier-of-fortune who has been invited to Havana to rid the country of Castro's rebels. He recognizes an unstoppable force and spends more time trying to woo a former girlfriend (Brooke Adams) from her toy boy husband than dealing with the rebels. It's not much of a story: Connery and Adams aren't required to provide much more than eye-candy while the real action takes place in the background.

There are some wonderful vignettes of the wealthy, pampered Spanish ruling class with their beautiful mansions, fashionable clothing and decadent entertainment. The mixed-race general population, in contrast, lives in squalor. In one scene groups of women wait outside a prison every day hoping for news of their disappeared husbands and fathers. There's not much doubt where the director's sympathies lie. And there lies both the strength and weakness of the movie. Your chances of enjoying the movie depend entirely on your own politics. If you see Fidel Castro as a communist stooge, the slight plot isn't nearly enough to compensate for the movie's propagandistic tendencies. If your sympathies are with the victims of the dictatorial Batista regime, "Cuba" is an eye into the past.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By James Daly on December 30, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
CUBA is a fine serio-comic story set in 1959 during the final stage of the Batista regime. Sean Connery is a mercenary brought to Cuba by one of Batista's generals (Martin Balsam) to help crush the threat of Castro's revolutionaries. Connery runs into a past lover, Brooke Adams, who is now the manager of a tobacco factory. As the couple get reacquainted, the political turmoil reaches a breaking point. CUBA isn't meant to be a detailed examination of a prominent historical event. Instead, Batista's downfall serves as a backdrop for the Connery/Adams relationship, and how their lives become intertwined with several other characters. The great supporting cast includes Jack Weston as an opportunistic American businessman, Denholm Elliott as a boozy pilot, Chris Sarandon as Adams' womanizing husband, and Hector Elizondo as a perceptive military officer. Director Richard Lester does an admirable job of mixing dramatic action with amusing comic bits. The film satirizes the mentality of military men and guerrillas in a somewhat zany way, without eliminating the more disturbing elements. There are no true "good guys" in the story, but viewers can empathize with Connery as he deals with the insanity around him. Curiously though, Brooke Adams' character comes off as rather unsympathetic. This is one of Connery's lesser-known films, which is too bad, because the movie deserves to be seen.
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