Customer Reviews


336 Reviews
5 star:
 (221)
4 star:
 (50)
3 star:
 (18)
2 star:
 (18)
1 star:
 (29)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


317 of 327 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still the best (DLC-8S & DLC-10S). Period.
It's true that the current build quality of all Cuisinart food processors does not live up to the rock solid, virtually indestructible reputation of their forebears of the 70's and 80's. ("Nothing is quite good enough" was their former advertising tag line.) However, the DLC-8S (and DLC-10S) is one of the few models that harkens back most directly to the original Magimix...
Published on December 11, 2011 by Muleshoe

versus
345 of 377 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cuisinart DLC-8S is Shoddy Shadow of former Cuisinarts
My 1987 DLC-7 is my 3rd Cuisinart. It has had daily use and is worn and has a small problem. I ordered the DLC-8s only to find it cannot compare to my old machine even in it's state of advanced age and I am returning it. For example the cord is short and light weight. The bowl is actually smaller...11 cups is really an exaggeration. The motor is 5.2 amps compared with the...
Published on December 6, 2001


‹ Previous | 1 234 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

317 of 327 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still the best (DLC-8S & DLC-10S). Period., December 11, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-8S Pro Custom 11-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
It's true that the current build quality of all Cuisinart food processors does not live up to the rock solid, virtually indestructible reputation of their forebears of the 70's and 80's. ("Nothing is quite good enough" was their former advertising tag line.) However, the DLC-8S (and DLC-10S) is one of the few models that harkens back most directly to the original Magimix 1800 (from France) that Carl Sontheimer introduced to the U.S. in 1973 as the first "Cuisinart." The DLC-8S is the direct descendant of a line that includes the 2800, CFP5 and the first DLC models of the early/mid-80's and it is still the best food processor currently on the market even if it's not quite the mythical beast it used to be.

All Cuisinart food processors used to sport essentially the same basic design except for their size: 7-cup (DLC-10), 11-cup (DLC-8), 14-cup (DLC-7) and 20-cup (DLC-X). It was easy to buy accessories: DLC-10 accessories begin with a "1" or an "8" (the bowl diameter was the same as the DLC-8 and used the same sized slicing discs); DLC-8 accessories begin with "8"; DLC-7 accessories begin with "0" (zero); and DLC-X accessories begin with "3." A Cuisinart was a Cuisinart.

Beginning in 1989 Cuisinart's focus started to transition from engineering and design to marketing when Conair bought the company and greatly expanded the Cuisinart "brand." This marked the beginning of a period of feature stagnation, cost cutting and quality "decontenting" for food processors that resulted a couple of production runs in the late 1990's/early 2000's that were truly questionable. Plus, in 1993 a little competition came into play as Kitchenaid decided to put their own brand of food processor on the market. Cuisinart was initially caught a bit off-guard as the new Kitchenaid models featured exceptional build quality and a freshly updated design with a "blender-style" rounded oval base. Kitchenaid begin to displace Cuisinart at the top of consumer evaluation ratings around the turn of the century as Cuisinart build quality tanked and Kitchenaid surged with a fresh design and great build quality.

Eventually, Cuisinart decided they had better compete and and introduced newer models (the "Premier" and "Prep Plus" series -- rounded base and a new [not necessarily better] feed tube safety interlock) and they also greatly improved the manufacturing build quality of their original series (DLC). More recently they have introduced the "Elite" series with nesting bowls and a completely new sealing lid and with an even newer safety interlock system.

Here's a break down of the current Cuisinart line-up: DLC-8 and DLC-10 (original style 11- and 7-cup models); DLC-20XX & DLC-30XX (XX=07, 09, 11, or 14 cup Prep Plus or Premier models; these are the "oval, rounded blender base" models with revised feedtube safety interlock); FP-12 and FP-14 (the newest Elite models with beefy square base, full seal tapered and multiple bowls, new snap on lid with built-in interlock separate from the feed tube and "Blade Lock"). There is also another "P" series (DFP or DLC-XPN) that features the "old, original" base and bowl bowl design with a newer feed tube design.

Here's the rub -- you can definitely detect the effects of "marketing" in the design of the newer models. These new features look great as bullet points on the box, but don't add anything to the utility of the original machine. The feed tube interlock on the 20XX, 30XX, DFP & XPN features a long slender stem on the pusher that inserts into a complicated mechanism with two rollers and a linkage that is very easy to jam. Plus, the long slender stem is relatively easy to break off rendering the machine inoperable. The newer Elite series with it's beefy square base (a la Kitchenaid), tapered nesting bowls (a la Kitchenaid), a snap on lid with safety lock independent of the feed tube (a la Kitchenaid) and a so-called Bladelock safety feature is just clumsy to use. I bought and returned the FP-12. It had a "huge" footprint on the counter. The nesting bowls were actually less convenient (the smaller nested bowl made the lid harder to snap on and you always had to remove it to use the big bowl). Worst was the "Bladelock" feature. It's just little nubbed prongs on the inside of the chopper blade hub that are supposed grab onto a raised molded ring on the inside of the central tube of the bowl. The idea is you don't have to hold the blade to keep it from falling out with whatever your pouring. It worked ok on the big bowl, but the prongs in the little bowl chopping blade were incorrectly molded and didn't catch on the raised ridge in the central bowl tube - anyone for a nasty surprise?

The DLC-8S just works -- the way every Cuisinart has worked since the early 1980's. It may not be built quite as good as it was then, but it comes with a 3-year total warranty (for those who abuse their bowls and feed tube/pusher assemblies) and a 5-year motor assembly warranty. It proudly takes it's place alongside a DLC-10 purchased in 1988 that is still going strong (has only needed one new sheath/spindle for $12.95) and has chopped a lifetime of onions and made loaves bread out the wazoo. Every recipe since about 1980 that employs a food processor refers to this type of machine. If you want the easiest and best, this is what you want.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


133 of 141 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A solid performer, with a few limitations, June 18, 2000
This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-8S Pro Custom 11-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
I've used my Cuisinart fairly hard - I make mustard (from mustard seed) on a small scale for sale at a farmer's market. I've had it for six or seven years now, so mine may not be identical to this model. But the number and the specs are.
You can swamp the machine in too much liquid - I can process up to about four cups of fairly liquid stuff, but no more or I have an overflow to deal with.
A dishwasher does a good job of cleaning the bowl and knife, and the knife has held its edge well. The bowl has a certain number of scratches after heavy use.
I've hardly ever used the plastic blade - even for dough, I use the steel blade. I have a few shredding/slicing disks, which have seen a reasonable amount of use for large scale salads, turkey stuffing, and sauerkraut. (sp?)
It doesn't dice. There's no technique by which true dice can be made in a food processor. You could use the processor to slice or even julienne and finish by hand, but it's too fussy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


345 of 377 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cuisinart DLC-8S is Shoddy Shadow of former Cuisinarts, December 6, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-8S Pro Custom 11-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
My 1987 DLC-7 is my 3rd Cuisinart. It has had daily use and is worn and has a small problem. I ordered the DLC-8s only to find it cannot compare to my old machine even in it's state of advanced age and I am returning it. For example the cord is short and light weight. The bowl is actually smaller...11 cups is really an exaggeration. The motor is 5.2 amps compared with the 6 amps of the DLC-7 and the DLC-8S is lighter. The deciding flaw however is the poorly designed switching arms on the feed tube. They are flimsy and an accident begging to happen. I am going to have my old machine repaired and look at the Kitchen Aid processors. Very sad to lose an outstanding product.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


345 of 378 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars There are better choices., May 3, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-8S Pro Custom 11-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
This food processor is made in China. For the same amount of money you can buy an 11 cup Kitchen Aid. It runs smoother, has the slicing blades and a mini bowl. The blades are Sabatier and are excellent. We tried both machines and returned the Cuisinart.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


210 of 229 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars This is not the Cuisinart you used to know!, October 12, 2004
This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-8S Pro Custom 11-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
Times have changed and so has the parent company that sells and services your food processor. The quality of materials and workmanship have gone downhill too!

My experience with the corporate machine was horrible. Days of long waits to talk to a customer service rep...never paid off. Each time I called I was eventually forwarded to a recorded message that explained that they were too busy and that I needed to leave my name and phone number. I never did get a call-back. Finally, after several attempts, I was able to get past the initial phone queue and actually talked to a live person who took the information about the condition of all the clear plastic parts on the processor. They were all severely cracked and were not far from flying apart. It seems they knew of the problem and offered to replace the parts on warranty. All I had to do was give them a credit card number to charge the shipping to. AND, nothing would happen UNTIL I sent the old pieces back...again at MY expense.

I sent the parts back promptly, but they didn't ship for another two weeks. And, here is the highlight of the episode... The lid they sent was the wrong one. Another round of phone calls yielded a person that said that Cuisinart had not processed the replacement yet...a full two weeks after they were notified. I still have not received the lid and the processor is useless without it.

BEWARE! This company tries to sell their products in the top-end of the price range, but their corporate customer service system is as bad as it gets...at any price. You can do yourself a favor and shop for another brand. I'm looking at KitchenAid. Shucks, it can't be any worse...and MAY be a much better experience over the long run.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


346 of 382 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Compare to the KitchenAid before you buy, May 3, 2000
By 
This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-8S Pro Custom 11-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
We headed out not long ago to buy a food processor and I would have *sworn* that the Cuisinart would be my choice - it's practically synonymous with "food processor"! A quick look at the new KitchenAid model changed my mind, though.
We were told that Cuisinart isn't being made the way it used to be - lesser quality blades, for example. The old blade-maker now provides KitchenAid with their blade, incidentally. Comparing the two models side by side, it's quickly apparent that the Cuisinart isn't nearly as well-made and it's much harder to clean than the Kitchenaid which is basically a single, sealed, "wipe clean" surface.
I hated to turn my back on a legendary product, but we've never looked back. Compare before you buy, especially at the identical price.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great workhouse for the home kitchen, July 17, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I spent a LOT of time reviewing various food processors before selecting this one. Kitchen Aid has a model that was recommended by many but I personally didn't like the design. Not that it is a big deal for most people, but my personal preference leaned towards the click push down buttons on this model vs the soft buttons on the Kitchen Aid. In addition, I didn't care to have the small bowl option inside the larger bowl. To me it seems like more possible clean up because the small bowl fits inside the larger one. I'm not sure that it causes you to have to clean the larger bowl, but that's the way it appears and I didn't care to try it.

This food processor has been in my kitchen for nearly two years now. I use if for several different things including salsa and pesto. Even though the liquid limit is relatively low (which seems to be the case with all processors) I am able to process a full batch with one 28 oz can of tomatoes, then add a second can. If the batch is transferred quickly to a container there is little to no problem with the liquid overflowing. If it sits for a bit, that much liquid is a problem.

When I buy cheese I buy in blocks and shred with this processor. Recently I needed to slice beef for beef jerky and I thought I would use my slicer/shredder attachment for my Bosch mixer. However, the food chute for the larger Bosch bowl was not as big as the chute on this Cuisinart. The Cuisinart worked great to slice beef quickly in just the right size for jerky.

The attachments are easy to use and adding liquid during processing is easy to do. The fact that the chute is toward the back bothered me at first but ultimately it really didn't become a big deal. I would consider this a great basic processor for any home. To me, that makes it a great buy and a great possible gift to newlyweds or for those with a new home.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good performance, but feed tube is a pain in the butt, October 3, 2004
By 
Heather "littleturtle30" (Coburg, Oregon United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-8S Pro Custom 11-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
I've had my Cuisinart for about 2 or 3 years now, and it does its job really well, as far as chopping and slicing and kneading goes. My complaint with it is that a very narrow and flismy plastic piece on the feed tube mechanism is NECESSARY for it work (I assume as a safety feature). Well, about a year into it, mine broke off (did I mention it's flimsy). I have "made do" with kinda wedging it in place each time I want to use the machine, but then I have to stand there and hold it the whole time it's running. I'm thinking if I ever lose this critical piece, that I will probably buy a Kitchen Aid.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


58 of 62 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Same problem with Cuisinart, October 19, 2004
This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-8S Pro Custom 11-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
I have had the same problem as the two other people who wrote less than satisfactory reviews with Cuisinart processors. I have had a 7-cup for years, and the "flimsy" plastic sleeve that fits into the back to allow the unit to turn on keeps breaking. Each time I have to order a replacement top from a kitchen products replacement parts store. It's about $35 each time. Am getting tired of doing that and am doing research into buying a new machine. After reading these reviews, will probably go with Kitchenaid. Thanks for the reviews.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the Cuisinart I have previously owned, November 24, 2006
By 
This review is from: Cuisinart DLC-8S Pro Custom 11-Cup Food Processor, White (Kitchen)
After using a Cuisinart for nearly 30 years this newest model is terrible. My others lasted years and this one less than one. The 11 cup processor mechanism that activates the motor is not aligned, therefore the motor won't start. If I fiddle with it the motor will start for a few spins. It is hard to get the top off. All in all a huge disappointment. I am no longer brand loyal, and will bite the cost and buy a new Kitchen Aid.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 234 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Cuisinart DLC-8S Pro Custom 11-Cup Food Processor, White
$330.00 $127.95
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.