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Cultural Intelligence: People Skills for Global Business (Easyread Large) Paperback – Large Print, October 12, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: Easyread Large
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: ReadHowYouWant; Large Print 16 pt edition (October 12, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1442955287
  • ISBN-13: 978-1442955288
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 0.8 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,890,711 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David C. (Dave) Thomas grew up in the mountains of North Carolina, followed a respectable career, and became a vice president at Bank of America. He found it a little dull. Kerr Inkson grew up in the Highlands of Scotland, did some degrees in psychology, and became a lecturer at Aston University in England. He found it a little dull. Dave's life changed when he went to do an MBA. He discovered a new intellectual world, full of exciting ideas and intellectual challenges. He left the bank, and completed a PhD. He found himself especially interested in the issue of internationalism and cross-cultural differences in business. He started to publish research papers and acquired a major international reputation in the field of international management. Kerr's life changed when he saw a job ad for an assistant professorship in management in some beautiful islands called New Zealand. In this remote corner of the globe, Kerr and his wife, Nan, found themselves living in Auckland, the city with the largest Polynesian population anywhere in the world. He was first author of a book called Theory K, a kind of New Zealand version of In Search of Excellence, which became a local best-seller. He did a lot more writing, much of it about new forms of career - including international careers - and became a full professor. Dave's and Kerr's lives changed again when they met one afternoon in Washington, D.C., and Kerr persuaded Dave to come and work with him at the University of Auckland. Dave and his wife, Tilley, spent several happy years in New Zealand's unique multicultural environment and traveling around Asia. Then Dave got itchy feet again and moved to Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, another multicultural city. Soon Dave too was a full professor.

More About the Author

David C Thomas (PhD University of South Carolina) is Professor of International Business at the Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
He is the author of eight books including Cultural Intelligence: Living and Working Globally, (2009, Berrett-Koehler Publishers). His book Cross-Cultural Management Essential Concepts (2008, Sage Publications) was the winner of the R. Wayne Pace Human Resource Development book of the year award for 2008. In addition, he has recently edited (with Peter B. Smith and Mark Peterson) The Handbook of Cross-Cultural Management Research from Sage Publications. His research on cross-cultural interactions in organizational settings has appeared in such journals as the Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Organization Studies, Journal of World Business, Journal of Business Research, Advances in International Comparative Management, Research in the Sociology of Organizations, Leadership Quarterly, and Organizational Dynamics. He is currently the Area Editor of the Journal of International Business Studies and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of World Business, Journal of Organizational Behavior, and European Journal of Cross-Cultural Competence and Management.
His previous academic postings have included positions at the Pennsylvania State University, The University of Auckland, New Zealand, where he was also Director of the Master of International Business Program and The Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Canada. He has held visiting positions at Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, the University of Hawaii, Massey University, New Zealand, and ESCEM, Tours, France. In addition to teaching at both undergraduate and post graduate level, Dr Thomas has developed executive education programs in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States and has served as a consultant to a number of multinational firms and government agencies in New Zealand and Canada. When not writing or teaching he can often be found scraping or varnishing (or sometimes sailing) his 1972 Cheoy Lee ketch Pounamu.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Bill Godfrey on March 6, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is a detailed survival manual for those who are new to working across cultures. Its aim is to help such people to raise their 'cultural intelligence' - their understanding of cultural diffrences and their impact and their skill with tools to recognize and overcome misunderstanding and failures of communication based on differing cultural expectations.

While it is pitched for those who have little or no cross-cultural experience, it contains material which will also be useful to those with substantial experience.

An appendix lists useful sources of specific country information.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Rana Sinha on April 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is a well-written book, which provides a generalist approach to dealing with cross-cultural issues with many excellent examples. The core idea of the book is based on the Hofstede model. One of the central criticisms of this model has been that nation state and culture are always presumed to be the same. Local culture does not follow political boundaries. The authors seem to be unable to avoid this trap.

Cultural Intelligence gives good insights on how to notice "Cultural Cruise-Control" and change own way of thinking. Providing some practical tools would have added to the value of this book, but this is a good book for international managers and HR personnel involved in multicultural business.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Jeevan on May 10, 2004
Format: Paperback
I have read countless books regarding inter-cultural communications and competence but I have to say that this is eons ahead of all others (including some by the same title). The strongest argument that the authors make here is that there are no patronising sets of rules to follow in different cultures, that one can, using an effective method and basic awareness, communicate across any culture successfully and without the aid of guidebooks and the like. In essence, this is the only book anyone will ever need on this subject...nice work!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Rolf Dobelli HALL OF FAME on December 12, 2007
Format: Paperback
brief book offers an easy-to-read description of what it takes to adapt to a culturally diverse business environment. David C. Thomas and Kerr Inkson make it clear that you can learn cultural intelligence only from experience, not from reading books. However, their manual does provide a basic introduction that will be extremely helpful to people experiencing cultural shock or dislocation. The most distinctive feature of the authors' treatment of the subject is their insistence on mindfulness as the fundamental first step in developing cultural intelligence. We believe this book will be particularly useful for businesspeople embarking on expatriate assignments, but anyone working in a business context that includes diverse cultures will benefit from reading it - and thus will become better equipped to get some of that all-important experience.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Hurley on February 13, 2005
Format: Paperback
I learned a lot from this book. It uses examples and case studies to drive home lessons on cultural literacy. If you are looking for a more business oriented book, consider "Doing Business in the New Latin America" by Thomas Becker. I can't make any recommendations regarding other regions.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dick Locke on September 8, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm the author of a book that was in print from 1996 to 2004 that was called "Global Supply Management, a Guide to International Purchasing." It had a few chapters on managing cultural differences. That's an area that I find very interesting, so I read this book.

While Dr. Thomas didn't intend this to be a textbook, training programs are developing around this work. I already noticed a "Train the Trainer" program for teaching Cultural Intelligence.

I thought this book was an excellent scholarly compendium of the multiple areas where cultural differences can impede business relationships. But ultimately I think that a user who wanted to understand and develop cultural intelligence will come away less confident than when he started.

There seems to be more emphasis on manners-level knowledge and less on the underlying differences in values and behavior that are often more troublesome than manners issues. He touches briefly on some Hofstede values but never mentions other important issues such as attention to the clock and schedules (the monochronic-polychronic dimension) or the differing importance cultures give to pleasing a customer.

Personally, I prefer cultural analyses that list a manageable handful of dimensions of cultural differences that can help people understand troublesome differences in behavior.
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