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Cultural Strategy: Using Innovative Ideologies to Build Breakthrough Brands Hardcover


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Cultural Strategy: Using Innovative Ideologies to Build Breakthrough Brands + How Brands Become Icons: The Principles of Cultural Branding + Chief Culture Officer: How to Create a Living, Breathing Corporation
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 408 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA (December 9, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 019958740X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199587407
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #416,753 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"May well be one of the most important books on advertising and branding in the past ten years."--Adliterate.com


"This kind of deep cultural relevance is not only a boon to marketing messaging, it is a key to blockbuster innovation. [Holt and Cameron's] retelling of the tales of Nike, Starbucks, and Ben & Jerry's is persuasive in proving that the entrepreneurs involved had an ear to the ground of the culture as they designed and developed their offerings. And their reports on some current innovators' attempts to devise 'cultural strategies' show that there might be reliable ways of doing so deliberately and therefore that any company hoping to launch an iconic offering might really be able to pull it off."--Julia Kirby, Harvard Business Review


About the Author


Douglas Holt is the L'Oréal Professor of Marketing at the Unversity of Oxford, and Co-Principal of The Cultural Strategy Group. Previously he was a professor of marketing at the Harvard Business School. He is a leading expert on brand strategy, having established cultural branding as an important new strategy tool in his best-selling book How Brands Become Icons: The Principles of Cultural Branding. He has developed cultural strategies for a wide range of brands, including Coca-Cola, Microsoft, Ben & Jerry's, Sprite, Jack Daniel's, MINI, MasterCard, Fat Tire beer, Qdoba, Georgia Coffee, Planet Green, and Mike's Hard Lemonade, along with a number of non-profit organizations. He holds degrees from Stanford, the University of Chicago, and Northwestern, and is the editor of the Journal of Consumer Culture. He has been invited to give talks at universities and management seminars worldwide, including the Global Economic Forum in Davos. He lives in Salida, Colorado.

Douglas Cameron is co-founder and Chief Strategy Officer at Amalgamated, an influential non-traditional advertising agency known for developing provocative cultural content across multiple media platforms. He began his career at Cliff Freeman & Partners, the most lauded creative shop of its time. He entered the world of marketing inadvertently: travelling the world as a bagpiper, he was invited by David Ogilvy to perform at his French castle. Ogilvy insisted he take up advertising. He worked with Holt extensively developing cultural strategies at Cliff Freeman and Amalgamated, which led to his role as co-author of Cultural Strategy. He graduated from Dartmouth College, where he received the English departments top graduating honor.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. Sullivan on December 7, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Liked this book very much. The irreverence and polemic were refreshing. Holt and Cameron practice what they preach, and don't pull punches. The ideas and thinking are solid. The cases are excellent. After reading I recommended to friends at ad agencies, many of whom no doubt face H & C's `brand bureaucracy'.

Style-wise, `Cultural Strategy' found a nice niche between scholarship and practice. I liked this approach. But if you prefer 1-2-3 books on brand and strategy, don't buy the book. You're going to get Max Weber and terms like `mimetic isomorphism' just as much you get stories on brands like Nike, Levi's, Vitamin Water and Fat Tire. I liked the combination, others might not.

As someone in strategy, I do have some beef with Holt and Cameron's stance against utility, or what they refer to as `mousetrap' thinking. They take the constructivist line of thinking too far, and it diminishes their argument. They need a foil, but of all their polemics this one feels more rhetorical than substantive. Ideally, value creation and cultural innovation work together. If subjectivity were all that mattered we wouldn't be in this recession. H & C have written particular kinds of cases-- products fighting it out in mature markets with homogeneous offerings. In these situations i think they're argument holds up better. In emerging markets where the there is still a great deal of diversity in offerings, i'm not as sure. The one outlier here is the freelancer's union case, which was quite good.

But on all other accounts, this book furthered my thinking. Even if you don't agree with the authors, they'll engage you. I'd read it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By William Ko on July 28, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This outstanding work underscores the importance of incorporating culture into marketing initiatives to drive sales growth and market share. Citing Weber's theory of bureaucratization in Economics and Society, Holt argues convincingly that leading firms have sacrificed marketing innovation for ineffective brand management based on standardization, superfluous scientific methodology, and dehumanization of the consumer products/services and the markets that they ultimately serve. Controversially, but supported with strong empircal examples, Holt asserts that the epistemic proclivities of establishing marketing as a 'faux science' has resulted in stagnant 'mousetrap' strategies that result in minimal gains in growth.

Supported by case-studies of both successful and unsuccessful marketing initiatives, Cultural Strategy is essential reading for academics, entrepreneurs and F500 management seeking iconoclastic reconceptualizations of the consumer goods landscape.

I suspect, however, that the prevailing path dependencies and perceptions of 'brand strategy' among leading firms in industry today will inhibit Holt's central thesis from attaining wide-scale practice. But perhaps as a greater number of agile entrepreneurs leverage 'cultural strategy' to win a greater share of blue ocean opportunities, the aforementioned market-leading firms will be compelled to take notice.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Burton on June 19, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm currently a marketing MBA and I found this book through a professor of mine. It takes a unique view of branding and is open about the fact that they provide benefits that are intangible. The biggest win for me on this book is the research done to write it. There are great case studies from well known brands and the authors take historical advertisements, cultural movements, and competitor actions into account to show the opportunities exploited by using cultural branding.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael Selander on September 26, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is an eye opener on the true cultural effects of good marketing campaigns. The book effectively and engagingly touches on the most important topics and features of a true cultural strategy. I would recommend this book for anyone in the marketing field.
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