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Culture and Imperialism Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 380 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage (May 31, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679750541
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679750543
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #146,087 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Edward Said makes one of the strongest cases ever for the aphorism, "the pen is mightier than the sword." This is a brilliant work of literary criticism that essentially becomes political science. Culture and Imperialism demonstrates that Western imperialism's most effective tools for dominating other cultures have been literary in nature as much as political and economic. He traces the themes of 19th- and 20th-century Western fiction and contemporary mass media as weapons of conquest and also brilliantly analyzes the rise of oppositional indigenous voices in the literatures of the "colonies." Said would argue that it's no mere coincidence that it was a Victorian Englishman, Edward G. Bulwer-Lytton, who coined the phrase "the pen is mightier . . ." Very highly recommended for anyone who wants to understand how cultures are dominated by words, as well as how cultures can be liberated by resuscitating old voices or creating new voices for new times.

From Publishers Weekly

The author of Orientalism examines the interrelationship of Occidental literature and imperialism from the 17th century to the Gulf war.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

This work is one of Edward Said's best , in fact, Culture and Imperialism is better than Orientalism.
Micheline Gros-Jean
His sympathies were with the poor Bedouins and he did not trust either the communist left nor the nationalist movements of the right.
Doug Anderson
He seems to want us to see the imperial motive in all cultural artefacts, most especially in "high art."
G. Heath

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

68 of 74 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 16, 2001
Format: Paperback
....
So, what is this book about? Well, contrary to what some of the "reviews" below assume, it's not about contemporary Middle East politics, or media coverage thereof, or anything even remotely like that. It's about literature-- European literature to be specific.
Essentially, Said proposes to look at what he calls "Imperialism" in European literature. (Although the title is "Culture and Imperialism" and while he does discuss one opera, he's not really concerned with culture or art, more broadly. He's really talking about literature here-- and especially novels. In truth, "Literature and Imperialism" would be a more accurate title.
So, what is imperialism, as Said uses it here? It is, he explains, an ideology-- a set of assumptions-- that justifies, supports, and legitimates the conquest, control, and domination of lands that are inhabited by other people, who speak different languages and have other traditions. Imperialism, as an ideology, is thus distinct from "Colonialism", which is the actual, real, activity of conquering, controling, and domination other lands and people. Imperialism is, Said might say, the intellectual/cultural/ideological base that makes an otherwise morally dubious project of colonialism (conquering and ruling over others) seem acceptable, even justifiable.
Essentially, Said traces the role that imperialism (as defineed above) plays in a host of European literary works, focussing on the past two centuries. After his theoretical/methodological introduction, each chapter is devoted to the discussion of a single literary work (or in some cases, multiple works by the same author), illuminating its imperialist qualities.
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51 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Micheline Gros-Jean on October 10, 2001
Format: Paperback
This work is one of Edward Said's best , in fact, Culture and Imperialism is better than Orientalism. The overarching theme is the interconnection between culture and society be it in the past or the present. His aim is not to disparage the West but to show how one's identity is more or less determined by one's relationship with the Other ( the third world). His obeservations on this relationship, the other and the west is quite enlightening. Contrary to what have been written, this is not an apologia for Islamicism ( Islamic Fundamentalists), he is indeed critical of fundamentalists of any stripe. Said is a secularist so it would be nonsensical for him to support a fundamentalist government. While he is critical of the West(rightfully so), he does acknowledge the undemocratic nature of Middle Eastern governments. His love for liberty and justice convinces the reader that he is sincere in his condemnation of Islamicism. This book is needed to be read carefully but once you're done reading you'll be glad to have done so.
[....]
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jiang Xueqin on April 15, 2010
Format: Paperback
Edward Said's "Culture and Imperialism" (not be confused with cultural imperialism) is meant to be a sequel to his breakthrough work "Orientalism," and that's what probably accounts for its "international bestseller" status. The book's main argument is that there was a symbiotic relationship between imperialism and the empire's metropolitan culture. Actions are not possible without thought, Said argues, and for imperialism to be possible people had to think and to will it. This cultural attitude and perception could only be made possible by the culture's literary elite, and resistance to this cultural domination necessitates that colonial cultures create their own literature.

Edward Said analyzes the imperial culture writers (Austen, Conrad, Kipling, Camus, etc.) individually before analyzing the nationalist writers such as Yeats (I really stopped paying attention after being told that Yeats, who is considered a fascist poet, is also a nationalist writer capable of liberating the mentality of his countrymen). Said claims that by analyzing literature in its cultural and thus imperialist content we gain a better understanding of literature. This is an intellectually dishonest argument, and I'm surprised and awed that man of Said's repute and academic standing would dare attempt it.

Said first analyzes "Mansfield Park," and makes several specious arguments. He argues that "Mansfield Park" is about how the protagonist Fanny Price (a distant cousin of the aristocratic family at Mansfield Park) incorporates the cultural attitudes and thinking of Mansfield Park, and eventually becomes its matron and guardian. Said goes on to argue that this transformation also reflects Austen's co-optation.
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21 of 28 people found the following review helpful By J. Michael Showalter on August 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
In this book, Edward Said (also author of the classic Orientalism) shows the broad grasp of imperialism (i.e. the possession of one culture/group fo people by another) through analysis of 'Western' authors and texts. First, this book differs from most, if not all other major 'revisionist' kinds of texts because its author never sets aside the value of reading anything: Said uses his erudition in order to illustrate the plight of the oppressed, as opposed to many others, who view erudition, developed through culture, as a device that can only bind one more into a group of people. Whereas others read stories of Conrad and see mainly a story of the white upper class, Said reads between the lines and shows Conrad's implications toward other people.
I guess that explanation was relatively unclear: I don't have the book in front of me. This is an important book for any person who wishes to consider themself either educated or worldly to read. Setting aside that it is brilliant for what it is about, just having the oppurtunity to read the words of its author would provide value enough.
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