Culture Wars and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $20.00
  • Save: $1.00 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Culture Wars: The Struggl... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good +. Small stains on upper page ends. Text is clean.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Culture Wars: The Struggle To Control The Family, Art, Education, Law, And Politics In America Paperback – October 14, 1992

11 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0465015344 ISBN-10: 0465015344 Edition: Reprint

Buy New
Price: $19.00
36 New from $7.05 127 Used from $0.01 2 Collectible from $7.24
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$19.00
$7.05 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Hero Quick Promo
Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now
$19.00 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Culture Wars: The Struggle To Control The Family, Art, Education, Law, And Politics In America + Culture War? The Myth of a Polarized America (3rd Edition)
Price for both: $44.10

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

In this excellent, scholarly work, Hunter explores the transition in deeply rooted cultural conflicts in American society. These are the political and social hostilities generated from differing systems of moral understanding involving such issues as abortion, homosexuality, families, education, laws, elections, censorship, media, and the arts. In the past, ancient animosities had been expressed along religious lines: Protestants versus Catholics, Christians versus Jews. Now the culture wars are the issues-centered conflicts between two passionately polarized groups, the "orthodox" and the "progressive." Concluding that the moderate voices within this public discourse are usually eclipsed, Hunter suggests some practical steps for us to acquire new analytical tools to resolve cultural conflict. Recommended for all academic libraries. (Index not seen.)-- Anne Page Mosby, Georgia State Univ. Lib., Atlanta
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews

America's ``identity'' is seen as a history of religious strife in this probing yet somewhat slanted study. Hunter (Sociology and Religious Studies/Univ. of Virginia; American Evangelicalism, 1983) uses historical references to religious battles throughout American history to show how yesterday's ecumenical divisions among Catholics, Protestants, and Jews have become realigned in recent years. Through debates about slavery, the Scopes trial, and the influence of deism on the Constitution, he elaborates on the ``new lines of conflict'' through the eyes of both clergy members and the more ``humanist'' intelligentsia. Hunter is adept at demonstrating how the battles are now between ``orthodox'' and ``progressive'' camps within faiths, and how political mine fields like gay rights, Roe v. Wade, and the ordination of women into the priesthood prompt a nagging concern over the roles of churches and synagogues in American life. The author has a pervasive regard for the role of family--possibly ``the beginning and end of contemporary culture'' since its dissolution may prove fatal to our social order. He also illustrates how the classic dualism between God and Satan has been transformed into an often unscrupulous intrigue between traditionalists and ``secular humanists.'' But Hunter betrays a possible bias regarding homosexuality. Here, the anti-gay ``convictions'' of a Jerry Falwell are treated as more worthy of serious debate than the fulminations against the ``evils'' of race- mixing or ``the Jewish Menace.'' In the end, Hunter seems to favor religious thinking over nontranscendental doctrines. Though giving short shrift to the secular viewpoint, Hunter still provides an informative look at America's ambiguous spiritual character. -- Copyright ©1991, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books; Reprint edition (October 14, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465015344
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465015344
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 1 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #163,353 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

James Davison Hunter is LaBrosse-Levinson Distinguished Professor of Religion, Culture and Social Theory at the University of Virginia and Director of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture. He is the author of Culture Wars and The Death of Character.

Photo by Kirsten Rose.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 51 people found the following review helpful By David T. Wayne on May 31, 2002
Format: Paperback
This was a textbook for me in seminary. I am in a conservative Presbyterian denomination and studied at a very conservative seminary, and this book got some interesting reviews from the students.
For me, it was a little difficult, since I don't have much background in sociology, but as I trudged through it I really grew to appreciate it. Some of my other classmates loved it too, but there were several who were quite taken aback by it. They didn't like it because Hunter didn't come out and condemn those who were on the wrong side of the culture wars.
But that is just the point - in this book he does not try to point out who is wrong and who is right, his object is to demonstrate why neither side is able to persuade, or prevail against the other.
Each side in the culture war has it's own set of presuppositions and assumptions that it speaks from. Because of this, that which seems most persuasive to one side completely misses those on the other side, because they don't share the same presuppositions. We are talking past one another.
Another problem that Hunter addresses is the issue of extremes and inflammatory rhetoric. Hunter says that, by and large, the culture wars are being fought by people on the extreme ends of their positions. So, the battle of the culture wars is usually fought with inflammatory rhetoric that doesn't persuade, it just angers.
As a sidenote I recently read a story about how communists used to train their young recruits. This particular communist said that when a young person adopted communism the best thing they could do was immediately set them on a street corner passing out communist leaflets. They would get attacked mercilessly, but this attack would only serve to harden and solidify the young communist in his or her beliefs.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By T. A. Smedes on February 22, 2006
Format: Paperback
Though the book was published originally published in 1991, it is no wonder that this book is still in print: it is as relevant as ever - and I daresay its relevance is increasing again.

In this book, Hunter gives us a wide-angle view of what is going on in American society since the second half of the twentieth century. Hunter argues that there is a culture war going on. Consequently, he aims at describing the historical and socio-political backgrounds of this cultural conflict.

In five parts, Hunter introduces the culture war (prologue and chapters 1 and 2), maps the lines of conflict (chapters 3 and 4), describes the means of the warfare: the discourse and technology (chapters 5 and 6), and extensively describes the fields of conflict: family, education, media and the arts, law, and electoral politics (chapters 7-11), and finally points out possibilities for a resolution (chapter 12 and the epilogue).

Hunter defines a cultural conflict as "political and social hostility rooted in different systems of moral understanding" (42). According to Hunter, the culture war in America revolves around different worldviews, "our most fundamental and cherished assumptions about how to order or lives - our own lives and our lives together in this society" (42). The contemporary culture war is "a struggle over national identity - over the meaning of America, who we have been in the past, who we are now, and perhaps most important, who we, as a nation, will aspire to become in the new millennium" (50).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Currie-Knight TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 26, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The title of my review refers to the fact that this book, while published in '91, is still quite an accurate portrayal of how the culture wars are conducted. The passing of 13 years and tenure of two presidents has not served to ameliorate the culture war between 'traditionalists' and 'progressives.' Hunter, then, was certainly right.

Hunter's main thesis with this book is that, quite frankly, the culture war being fought over our schools, family policy, law, entertainment, etc. is not a war that will likely EVER engender a consensus. In fact, as it stands now, it seems even to proclude rational debate in favor of charged rhetoric, miscaricaturizations of opponents, and...well...mudslinging.

Hunter asserts this thesis, backs it up with chronicles of how the culture war has been conducted thus far, and conjectures as to why it is so. First, he says, we are dealing with core philosophic differences over questions to do with 'how the world should be.' Thus, both sides have deep emotions on the said issues. Second, there is no incentive to try and foster consensus because in an adversarial system like ours, the game is about power - the power to get your policy instituted and your other's quashed. Third, each 'side' operates using somewhat incompatible philosophic assumptions. To the anti-abortion-rights activist, it is a child and abortion is murder. To the abortion rights activist, it is only potential life and prohibiting abortion is denying the mother freedom of person. Where one sees freedom (either of the mother or fetus), the other sees either servitude or murder. Incomatibilities like these, says Hunter, will ensure that there will be no satisfactory end to the culture war - just a long, tiring, rhetorically charged, and endless, struggle.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Culture Wars: The Struggle To Control The Family, Art, Education, Law, And Politics In America
This item: Culture Wars: The Struggle To Control The Family, Art, Education, Law, And Politics In America
Price: $19.00
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: moral truth and moral tradition